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Wrong Michael Durfor?

Michael W. Durfor

Executive Director

Northeast Resource Recovery Association

HQ Phone:  (603) 736-4401

Direct Phone: (603) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Northeast Resource Recovery Association

2101 Dover Rd

Epsom, New Hampshire,03234

United States

Company Description

Experience Strength in Members! Since 1981, the Northeast Resource Recovery Association (NRRA) a FIRST-IN-THE-NATION , member driven, non-profit recycling cooperative*, has been a source of educational, technical and marketing assistance in the areas of waste ...more

Web References(75 Total References)


Contact | NRRA

www.nrra.net [cached]

Michael Durfor, Executive Director - mdurfor@nrra.net
Administration Department


March 18, 2015-Full of Scrap | NRRA

www.nrra.net [cached]

According to Michael Durfor, the leader of a nonprofit that coordinates waste haulers for 400 New England municipalities, the broader recycling challenges are not unique to Thetford - or even to New England - and in his opinion, the root cause stretches to the other side of the world.
"The markets themselves are in a very volatile state, so everybody's having to re-examine what makes sense, what's cost effective and what's sustainable," said Durfor, executive director of the Northeast Regional Recovery Association, whose municipal clients include Thetford and many other Upper Valley towns. "It's tied to the global marketplace." Durfor said that while China is a "big buyer of recyclables," the market there for recyclables is constricting more rapidly than many in the industry had expected. That leads to recyclables being sold for less in the domestic markets, where there's not as much competition. Once those markets fill up, domestic buyers are "not going to take (recyclables)." At home, that means that haulers' costs are remaining roughly the same, while the value of the recyclables is going down. One of NRRA's roles is to act like a dispatcher to coordinate private haulers to cart away towns' waste, and a hauler from the Boston area has typically been assigned to several towns in the Upper Valley. But while Durfor said discussions continue between NRRA and all of its haulers, the concern among some towns is that long round trips are becoming less and less attractive for haulers. Durfor said the plan may be more plausible than Wolfe had suggested. Durfor said that while it won't be in the near future or at previous levels, he expects the markets will normalize, and he hopes towns and taxpayers don't give up on recycling before then. "The biggest thing is just patience," he said, "and not to give up on a recycling program that's been successful over the years when they stub their toe. Please contact Marilyn, Mike or Bonnie at 1-800-223-0150


NRRA Staff | NRRA

www.nrra.net [cached]

Pictured Left to Right, Rear to Front: Lindsay Dow, Brenna Carriger, Ryan Stewart, Mike Nork, Gwen Erley, MJ Poch, Marilyn Weir, Mike Durfor, Bonnie Bethune, Paula Dow, Stacey Morrison
Michael Durfor, Executive Director mdurfor@nrra.net 603.736.4401 ext 16 Mike is a Graduate of Syracuse University with a B.A. in Political Science, and holds an MBA from Plymouth State University. Mike came to NRRA as a consultant in December of 2008 and became the Executive Director in October of 2009. Since joining NRRA, Mike has increased support for member services outreach and technical support programs, started the "Full of Scrap" bi-weekly newsletter, updated market pricing, and added single-stream recycling and municipal solid waste contracts as part of NRRA's menu of material handling programs available to members. Mike has increased the visibility of the NRRA School Recycling Club programs and, as a result, NRRA has received several Federal Grants for School Recycling outreach programs. Goofing off! Left to Right: MJ Poch, Paula Down, Mike Durfor, Hiding behind the plant: Marilyn Weir and Gwen Erley, Front and Center: Bonnie Bethune, Stacey Morrison, Brenna Carriger, Lindsay Dow, Ryan Stewart, Mike Nork Left to Right: MJ Poch, Paula Down, Mike Durfor, Hiding behind the plant: Marilyn Weir and Gwen Erley, Front and Center: Bonnie Bethune, Stacey Morrison, Brenna Carriger, Lindsay Dow, Ryan Stewart, Mike Nork


NRRA Executive Director Mike Durfor on the realities of recycling | Waste Dive

www.wastedive.com [cached]

NRRA Executive Director Mike Durfor on the realities of recycling
Waste Dive sat down with Durfor during NRRA's annual conference in Manchester, NH on May 23 to learn more about the association's work, get his take on waste trends in the Northeast and talk about what it takes to pay for recycling. MIKE DURFOR: Sixty years ago we didn't have any plastic, and plastic is particularly challenging because of the fact that it's lightweight. It's the commodity pricing, it's the product that's being used for packaging and it's the logistics of getting it to a facility so it can be processed. I did a presentation with Dylan de Thomas [from The Recycling Partnership] a year ago and he said everybody wants to blame oil, right? It's the low cost of oil. Mike Durfor Executive Director, NRRA DURFOR: It shouldn't be "single-stream is all bad. DURFOR: We've gotten really good cooperation from New Hampshire DES. DURFOR: I think Maine is going to do it voluntarily. DURFOR: Absolutely. You can't go to any of the conferences around here without organics being at the top of the list. Where do you see NRRA fitting into the broader industry conversation and do you see that role changing if potential EPA budget cuts to recycling programs go through? DURFOR: We've got a diversified revenue stream. We don't depend on grants from the federal government. It's nice when we get them, but our budgeting is such that we depend on revenue from our other sources that we have and that makes us a little bit unique. "You can't go to any of the conferences around here without organics being at the top of the list." Mike Durfor Executive Director, NRRA DURFOR: Every day. A lot more technical support in contract negotiations. NRRA Executive Director Mike Durfor on the realities of recycling Talkin' Trash with Waste Dive: Is mixed waste processing the key to higher diversion rates?


Mass. Communities the Latest to Feel Sting of Recyclable Markets

www.waste360.com [cached]

That means communities that once made good money recycling are getting far less -- or even have to pay to get rid of it -- said Michael Durfor, executive director of Northeast Resource Recovery Association.
The group works with cities and towns to develop recycling programs. "When it costs more money to recycle something than to throw it away, that creates a big challenge for local governments," said Durfor.


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