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This profile was last updated on 12/12/10  and contains information from public web pages.

Mr. Michael Cohill

Wrong Michael Cohill?
Phone: (330) ***-****  
 
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

35 Total References
Web References
iCanGarden.com
www.icangarden.com, 12 Dec 2010 [cached]
by Michael Cohill
...
"Shhhh, the secret is," Michael Cohill, director of the American Toy Marble Museum, touches his finger to his lips, "we found Santa. Cohill's blue eyes twinkle like the small Blue Santa he holds in his hand.
"It's a wishing Santa" he explains. "You hold it in your hand and wish for the present you want for Christmas."
Doing extensive historical research for the Marble Museum, Cohill and Graham discovered the significance of the Blue Santa and how it was made.
...
Cohill is now using those same, somewhat crude, historic mass-production methods to make reproductions of the Blue Santa.
...
The Blue Santa was a penny toy," says Cohill, gingerly cradling the original Blue Santa.
"This was the birthplace of the modern toy industry. Previously, hand-made toys were so expensive only the wealthiest families could afford to buy a toy for their children. With the introduction of mass-production, for the first time in world history, all children could have a toy," says Cohill.
...
Cohill goes on to say," When archeologists working at the site of the first mass-produced toy found the Blue Santa, at the birthplace of the modern industry, where from that point forward all children could have a toy, well then this Blue Santa is the real Santa (a metaphor on the miracle of mass-production) and we've discovered the original North Pole."
"Shhhh, the secret. . . we ...
www.prweb.com, 11 Dec 2010 [cached]
"Shhhh, the secret. . . we found Santa Claus," say Michael Cohill, director of the American Toy Marble Museum.
...
"Shhhh, the secret is," Michael Cohill, director of the American Toy Marble Museum, touches his finger to his lips, "we found Santa. Cohill's blue eyes twinkle like the small Blue Santa he holds in his hand.
"It's a wishing Santa" he explains. "You hold it in your hand and wish for the present you want for Christmas."
Doing extensive historical research for the Marble Museum, Cohill and Graham discovered the significance of the Blue Santa and how it was made.
...
Cohill is now using those same, somewhat crude, historic mass-production methods to make reproductions of the Blue Santa.
...
The Blue Santa was a penny toy," says Cohill, gingerly cradling the original Blue Santa.
"This was the birthplace of the modern toy industry. Previously, hand-made toys were so expensive only the wealthiest families could afford to buy a toy for their children. With the introduction of mass-production, for the first time in world history, all children could have a toy," says Cohill.
...
Cohill goes on to say," When archeologists working at the site of the first mass-produced toy found the Blue Santa, at the birthplace of the modern industry, where from that point forward all children could have a toy, well then this Blue Santa is the real Santa (a metaphor on the miracle of mass-production) and we've discovered the original North Pole."
...
Michael Cohill The American Toy Marble Museum 330-396-1670
Ohiomagazine.com | Ohio Travel Articles
www.ohiomagazine.com, 1 Feb 2007 [cached]
Here, let me show you how ... " Michael Cohill, manager of the American Toy Marble Museum in Akron, kneels down inside a carpeted ring littered with white and black marbles.He expertly holds a marble between his fingers and shoots it with lightning speed and precision.
...
Cohill is passionate about marbles.The artist and toy inventor is on a mission to preserve the history of marbles and toy-making in Akron and Ohio, and to revive the once highly competitive and popular sport of marbles.Cohill, who was born in Denver and spent the first seven years of his life in Mexico City as the son of a Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. executive, hopes they'll once again roll across America.He's counting on the museum, located in downtown Akron's Lock 3 Park, and activities that include The Akron District Marbles Tournament to inspire people to "play for keeps."
"The Akron District Marbles Tournament began in 1923 and continued ... until World War II, when [it] was canceled.After the war, the VFW revived the tournament and kept it going until the early 1960s.I revived The Akron District Marbles Tournament in 1990," says Cohill.
Cohill's reputation as "Akron's Marble Man" might have been fate.After attending art school in California, he moved to Akron to be near family.He opened a studio where he could concentrate on his artwork.It happened to be the site of an old marble works, and Cohill began researching Akron's contribution to the toy marbles industry.
Today, the majority of marbles comprising the museum was collected during excavations on former marble factory sites in Akron or purchased.
...
Michael Cohill is passionate about toy marbles.
...
Cohill and museum staff members were given permission to dig on site, and their finest discoveries are now on display.
...
Cohill has taught hundreds of schoolchildren to play marbles.He and his wife, Sara, give a $1,000 college scholarship to tournament winners, one boy and one girl.Four awards have been given so far.He never passes up the opportunity to talk aggies, pontils (a dimple left on a hand-made marble) or submarines (an interior design mistake that increases the value of a collectible marble).
"Look at this!I just got this one yesterday.It's beautiful.If it were in perfect condition, it would be worth $2,000 or $3,000," Cohill exclaims, as he shows museum visitors a vintage marble with a rare pink band of color.
...
For visitors who can't leave without a souvenir, the museum sells marble jewelry made by Cohill's wife, small bags of you-pick-'em marbles for $5 or $10, and stunning marbles that Cohill makes in limited amounts for $6 each.
"The stone marbles I make from [recycled] marble are made using an extremely old grinding technique, similar to one used in Pharaohic Egypt to make limestone marbles.It is a very dirty and dusty process, but does not involve heat or use of a mold," says Cohill."To make our hand-made glass marbles, we reproduced a marble-making hand tool patented in Akron in 1890.We make our own glass using actual glass formulas used in the 1890s to 1910s in Akron to make marbles.The sand and color pigments are heated to 2,100 degrees for 24 hours in order to turn the materials into molten glass."
Cohill also sells marbles made by Jabo, a marble manufacturer with a factory in Reno, Ohio, "the only manufacturer of traditional American playing marbles left in the United States," according to Cohill.Sales help support the museum's operation.
"Akron, Ohio, really was the marble manufacturing center of the world from 1884 to 1951," says Cohill.
Michael Cohill, founder of ...
www.ohio.com, 3 Aug 2009 [cached]
Michael Cohill, founder of the American Toy Marble Museum in Akron and organizer of the tournament for the past 20 years, was blown away by her generosity. ''It's so unusual, but it doesn't surprise.
...
Michael Cohill, founder of the American Toy Marble Museum in Akron and organizer of the tournament for the past 20 years, was blown away by her generosity. ''It's so unusual, but it doesn't surprise.
Library News>
www.smfpl.org, 1 Dec 2003 [cached]
Michael Cohill will discuss the toys of this era and bring toys to show.In particular, he will teach youngsters how to play the marble game of "ringers", the game played in marble tournaments.Mr. Cohill is a board member of the American Toy and Marble Museum in Akron.
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