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2016-05-09T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Michael Blades?

Mr. Michael Blades

Aerospace and Defense Senior Industry Analyst

Frost & Sullivan

Direct Phone: (210) ***-****       

Email: m***@***.com

Frost & Sullivan

7550 West Interstate 10 Suite 400

San Antonio, Texas 78229

United States

Company Description

Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Consulting Company, partners with clients to accelerate their growth. The company's Growth Partnership Services, Growth Consulting and Career Best Practices empower clients to create a growth-focused culture that generates, ev... more

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Background Information

Web References (125 Total References)


"Until now, drone racing has been ...

www.ecommercetimes.com [cached]

"Until now, drone racing has been mostly populated by pilots that are gamers or RC model aircraft pilots," said Michael Blades, aerospace and defense senior industry analyst at Frost & Sullivan.

"The large audience that ESPN draws will undoubtedly produce interest from sports fans that may not have known about the sport," he told the E-Commerce Times.
Investment in the sport has been significant, however. Steve Ross, the owner of the Miami Dolphins, and his venture capital firm invested some US$1 million, Blades said.
...
"Interest in the sport is growing rapidly and the market for platforms, [first-person viewer] devices and accessories will grow accordingly," said Blades.
Moreover, drones likely will continue to evolve with improvements in controllers, platforms, motors, FPV devices, propellers and other accessories as the sport gains popularity, he suggested.
...
"It's a sport where someone doesn't need athletic talent, so it will appeal to many," added Blades. "Furthermore, investment by wealthy individuals and firms as well as significant monetary prizes for winners will draw even more interest -- a 15-year-old young man from the UK recently earned $250,000 by winning the World Grand Prix of drone racing in Dubai."
Crash and Burn?
For ESPN, the stakes aren't that high. "It is low risk as they can only benefit if the broadcast is a success, and if not they will move on to other opportunities," said Blades.
"The stakes for the IRDA are higher, although low viewership does not translate to failure," he noted.
...
"The idea must be attacked with safety in mind for both operators and spectators," said Blades.
"Currently, drone racing employs spotters and nets, and there will need to be standardized safety procedures and specifications for platforms and communications," he added.
However, if an aircraft loses communication and flies away -- or worse, a spectator is hurt -- the liability involved could cripple the sport.
"Operators and/or organizers will need insurance, and I'm not sure underwriters understand the risks," Blades said.


"Until now, drone racing has been ...

www.technewsworld.com [cached]

"Until now, drone racing has been mostly populated by pilots that are gamers or RC model aircraft pilots," said Michael Blades, aerospace and defense senior industry analyst at Frost & Sullivan.

"The large audience that ESPN draws will undoubtedly produce interest from sports fans that may not have known about the sport," he told the E-Commerce Times.
Investment in the sport has been significant, however. Steve Ross, the owner of the Miami Dolphins, and his venture capital firm invested some US$1 million, Blades said.
...
"Interest in the sport is growing rapidly and the market for platforms, [first-person viewer] devices and accessories will grow accordingly," said Blades.
Moreover, drones likely will continue to evolve with improvements in controllers, platforms, motors, FPV devices, propellers and other accessories as the sport gains popularity, he suggested.
...
"It's a sport where someone doesn't need athletic talent, so it will appeal to many," added Blades. "Furthermore, investment by wealthy individuals and firms as well as significant monetary prizes for winners will draw even more interest -- a 15-year-old young man from the UK recently earned $250,000 by winning the World Grand Prix of drone racing in Dubai."
Crash and Burn?
For ESPN, the stakes aren't that high. "It is low risk as they can only benefit if the broadcast is a success, and if not they will move on to other opportunities," said Blades.
"The stakes for the IRDA are higher, although low viewership does not translate to failure," he noted.
...
"The idea must be attacked with safety in mind for both operators and spectators," said Blades.
"Currently, drone racing employs spotters and nets, and there will need to be standardized safety procedures and specifications for platforms and communications," he added.
However, if an aircraft loses communication and flies away -- or worse, a spectator is hurt -- the liability involved could cripple the sport.
"Operators and/or organizers will need insurance, and I'm not sure underwriters understand the risks," Blades said.


Technology Training Corp. Announces "Drone Systems and Counter Drone Technologies" Symposium | Company Newsroom of Technology Training Corporation

tps: [cached]

Mr. Michael Blades Senior Industry Analyst, Aerospace & Defense, Frost & Sullivan


Mike Blades - Senior ...

unmannedsystemsinstitute.com [cached]

Mike Blades - Senior Industry Analyst - Aerospace & Defense | Frost & Sullivan

...
Mike Blades, Senior Industry Analyst, Aerospace & Defense | Frost & Sullivan


Two years ago Mike Blades, ...

www.northjersey.com [cached]

Two years ago Mike Blades, an aerospace and defense-industry analyst for the market-research firm Frost & Sullivan, estimated that Americans would purchase 200,000 drones a month in 2015. That's not bad for an industry that in 2010 did not exist. But even then Blades may have underestimated demand; recently Rich Swayze, a top FAA official, estimated that Americans gave up to 1 million drones as gifts last Christmas.

...
Blades has upped his predictions accordingly. In 2014 he thought the commercial market for drones would reach $4.5 billion by 2020; now he thinks a more accurate guess is $6.5 billion.
"Just in the last year or two, really good drones have become really affordable," Blades said. "This market is only going to keep getting bigger."
As demand grows, so do calls for more regulation. The FAA's rules were the first step nationally, but Blades and Ari Rosmarin, the public policy director of the ACLU of New Jersey, agree it won't be the last.
...
"Some people didn't want to have to deal with the consequences if something goes wrong," Blades said.
...
Two years ago Mike Blades, an aerospace and defense-industry analyst for the market-research firm Frost & Sullivan, estimated that Americans would purchase 200,000 drones a month in 2015. That's not bad for an industry that in 2010 did not exist. But even then Blades may have underestimated demand; recently Rich Swayze, a top FAA official, estimated that Americans gave up to 1 million drones as gifts last Christmas.
...
Blades has upped his predictions accordingly. In 2014 he thought the commercial market for drones would reach $4.5 billion by 2020; now he thinks a more accurate guess is $6.5 billion.
"Just in the last year or two, really good drones have become really affordable," Blades said. "This market is only going to keep getting bigger."
As demand grows, so do calls for more regulation. The FAA's rules were the first step nationally, but Blades and Ari Rosmarin, the public policy director of the ACLU of New Jersey, agree it won't be the last.
...
"Some people didn't want to have to deal with the consequences if something goes wrong," Blades said.

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