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2015-12-08T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Michael Angwin?

Mr. Michael Angwin

Chief Executive Officer

Michael Angwin Associates

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Michael Angwin Associates

Background Information

Employment History

Executive Director

Uranium Information Centre Ltd.

Senior Executive Roles

Rio Tinto Limited

Director, Economic Policy

Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet

Affiliations

Member Login
Yamatji Aboriginal Corporation

Web References (192 Total References)


Call for debate to dispel ignorance based fear – Australian Uranium Blog: Comments on this blog should never be taken as investment advice

www.australianuranium.com.au [cached]

Australia should have a debate on the implications of introducing nuclear energy given that it has 40% of the world's low cost uranium resources, Uranium Association executive director Michael Angwin told MINING DAILY.

"As suppliers of raw fuel to the nuclear power industry, we don't believe there should be any principal objections to a nuclear power industry in Australia. After all, 31 other countries around the world are currently employing nuclear power," he said.
Angwin said it makes sense to have the nuclear power debate in Australia.
"If we have such a debate and we come out the other end without nuclear power it will be because we know we have better alternatives to it and if we come out the other end with nuclear power, then we will know that we've got it for good reasons," he said.
"People fear uranium because they don't understand it. A debate would help clear up any issues of this nature."
While Angwin is a strong proponent for Nuclear energy, he said having an extensive uranium resource was not a reason for wanting nuclear energy.


Call for Debate on Australian Uranium Power – Australian Uranium Blog: Comments on this blog should never be taken as investment advice

www.australianuranium.com.au [cached]

Executive director Michael Angwin is attending a mining conference in Adelaide and says it is time for a renewed debate on nuclear power, given that Australia has 40 per cent of the world's low cost uranium resources.

He says there are 31 countries using nuclear power in a growing industry world-wide.
Mr Angwin says emotion cannot be discounted from a nuclear power debate.
"There is lots of emotion in this debate and you need two things when you deal with either uranium or nuclear power," he said.
"The first thing you need is facts, the second thing you need is engagement with your stakeholders so that you can able them to say what worries them and to deal with what worries them in a genuine and timely way."
Mr Angwin says it makes sense to have the debate in Australia.
"If we have such a debate and we come out the other end without nuclear power it will be because we know we have better alternatives to it and if we come out the other end with nuclear power, then we will know that we've got it for good reasons," he said.


Another Reduction Uranium Supply Story – Australian Uranium Blog: Comments on this blog should never be taken as investment advice

www.australianuranium.com.au [cached]

Michael Angwin, of the Australian Uranium Association, thinks the industry will ride out the tough time.

"The increase in demand for nuclear power over the next 20 years or so will be between 50 and 100 per cent and Australia, with 40 per cent of the world's low-cost uranium resources, is well-placed to meet that demand," he said.
He says demand will be fuelled by a move towards low-carbon energy.


Australia should have a debate on ...

www.australianuranium.com.au [cached]

Australia should have a debate on the implications of introducing nuclear energy given that it has 40% of the world's low cost uranium resources, Uranium Association executive director Michael Angwin told MINING DAILY.

"As suppliers of raw fuel to the nuclear power industry, we don't believe there should be any principal objections to a nuclear power industry in Australia. After all, 31 other countries around the world are currently employing nuclear power," he said.
Angwin said it makes sense to have the nuclear power debate in Australia.
"If we have such a debate and we come out the other end without nuclear power it will be because we know we have better alternatives to it and if we come out the other end with nuclear power, then we will know that we've got it for good reasons," he said.
"People fear uranium because they don't understand it. A debate would help clear up any issues of this nature."
While Angwin is a strong proponent for Nuclear energy, he said having an extensive uranium resource was not a reason for wanting nuclear energy.
...
Michael Angwin, of the Australian Uranium Association, thinks the industry will ride out the tough time.
"The increase in demand for nuclear power over the next 20 years or so will be between 50 and 100 per cent and Australia, with 40 per cent of the world's low-cost uranium resources, is well-placed to meet that demand," he said.
He says demand will be fuelled by a move towards low-carbon energy.
...
Executive director Michael Angwin is attending a mining conference in Adelaide and says it is time for a renewed debate on nuclear power, given that Australia has 40 per cent of the world's low cost uranium resources.
He says there are 31 countries using nuclear power in a growing industry world-wide.
Mr Angwin says emotion cannot be discounted from a nuclear power debate.
"There is lots of emotion in this debate and you need two things when you deal with either uranium or nuclear power," he said.
"The first thing you need is facts, the second thing you need is engagement with your stakeholders so that you can able them to say what worries them and to deal with what worries them in a genuine and timely way."
Mr Angwin says it makes sense to have the debate in Australia.
"If we have such a debate and we come out the other end without nuclear power it will be because we know we have better alternatives to it and if we come out the other end with nuclear power, then we will know that we've got it for good reasons," he said.


Executive director Michael ...

www.australianuranium.com.au [cached]

Executive director Michael Angwin is attending a mining conference in Adelaide and says it is time for a renewed debate on nuclear power, given that Australia has 40 per cent of the world's low cost uranium resources.

He says there are 31 countries using nuclear power in a growing industry world-wide.
Mr Angwin says emotion cannot be discounted from a nuclear power debate.
"There is lots of emotion in this debate and you need two things when you deal with either uranium or nuclear power," he said.
"The first thing you need is facts, the second thing you need is engagement with your stakeholders so that you can able them to say what worries them and to deal with what worries them in a genuine and timely way."
Mr Angwin says it makes sense to have the debate in Australia.
"If we have such a debate and we come out the other end without nuclear power it will be because we know we have better alternatives to it and if we come out the other end with nuclear power, then we will know that we've got it for good reasons," he said.

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