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This profile was last updated on 5/19/12  and contains information from public web pages.

Mrs. May C. Gutteridge

Wrong May C. Gutteridge?

Member

Order of Canada
 
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Web References
May ...
maygutteridge.com, 19 May 2012 [cached]
May Gutteridge
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Friends of May Gutteridge
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Friends of May Gutteridge
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I met May in her twilight years, and now I am in my twilight years, and she continues to influence me."
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This woman was very kind to young May, and May took her as a model of service. She told me that she thought the highest honour was to be called a Parish Worker (she always saw the designation in capital letters). When May became a member of the Order of Canada in 1981, her personal modesty made her declare that the honour wasn't hers alone, but belonged to the St. James' Social Service team.
I remember May and her husband at Mass at S. James, always friendly, always reverent. She was a remarkable woman. A great Parish Worker."
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"For those of us, who saw and interacted with May, we saw a woman who could be tough with bureaucrats when seeking help for the poor and downtrodden in the Downtown Eastside and yet a gentle and peaceful woman.
May in the middle of Sunday worship would interrupt her worship to offer a loving word, a hug or some money to "a street person" who had wandered into the church, and/or on some occasions might be causing a disturbance.
May, I believe, was a woman who truly lived her faith."
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It was 1997 when Tyleen Katz formally introduced me to May Gutteridge. At the time, Tyleen and I were working together on a fundraising committee to raise the funds for a new hospice in Vancouver. Tyleen had known May for some time and was a great admirer. I had met May briefly before and knew her by reputation through research work I had assisted with in the form of a needs assessment and a feasibility study for the development of the new hospice. We hoped that this facility would help to absorb the growing waiting list of the only other existing free-standing hospice on Powell Street ? a wonderful oasis for the dying known as ?May?s Place?.
Tyleen was frustrated that the extent of May?s life accomplishments, especially those changes she had effected on Vancouver?s Downtown Eastside, had not been recognized in any significant way. Consequently, Tyleen contracted me in my capacity as a personal historian to interview May for a total of four hours, which I did in February and March, 1997. Tyleen paid me for this work, and I was pleased to donate the remainder of the time I spent interviewing and transcribing the tapes so that a more permanent record could be started of May?s impressive and inspiring work.
As many others had undoubtedly discovered before me, one didn?t engage in conversation with May Gutteridge for hours without falling completely in love with her. Sitting in her kitchen over numerous cups of tea, I grew closer to this remarkable woman and to her story. Her husband Arthur would occasionally tread softly through the kitchen and silently salute us with a wave ? an appearance that always prompted May to greet him with deep affection.
As time went on, May and I continued our new friendship with occasional visits and the mutual wish to have something come of this story we had started. At one point in 1999 I applied with the help of the St. James Society?s administration to the BC Heritage Trust for a grant to further the work we had initiated, but funding was not granted at the time. As a new mother and a personal historian who was just beginning to build a small business, I lamented the fact that I was unable to donate the time and funds necessary to bring May?s story to completion.
May spoke eloquently about her life and its many turns, but it was clear that what she really wanted to talk about was her work in Vancouver. What I recall most was her humility in the face of such accomplishment. In her descriptions on and off tape, May revealed the degree and intensity of her commitment to the community she had chosen to adopt as her own through the St. James Anglican Church (and subsequently to the St. James Social Services Society). May?s leadership was palpable in the way that she spoke and in her unswerving passion for what she knew was right. She lived and breathed her loyalty to people whose life circumstances had brought them hardship and seemingly insurmountable challenge. May?s knew through her faith that the challenge was in fact not insurmountable. She was full of hope and light. Her legacy remains as such.?
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Doug?s admiration of the work of Mrs. Gutteridge and her biography is very readable and well- presented.?
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Friends of May Gutteridge
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Friends of May Gutteridge on Facebook
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May Gutteridge
Diocese of New Westminster - Anglican Church of Canada
newwestminster.anglican.org, 28 July 2001 [cached]
May Gutteridge, founder of the St. James Service Society, diesDiocese of New Westminster - Anglican Church of Canada
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The grit of May Gutteridge
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May Gutteridge, founder of the St. James Service Society, dies.
The organization she began in the basement of St. James, Vancouver, now helps thousands.
MAY C. GUTTERIDGE, member of the Order of Canada, founder of the St. James Community Service Society on the Downtown East Side of Vancouver, died February 26 in the Palliative Care Ward at UBC Hospital following a three-month illness.She was 84.
From work in the basement of St. James Anglican Church at 303 East Cordova Street, St. James Community Service Society has grown to become one of the largest social service agencies in Vancouver, with 250 employees who help about 2,000 people each month, with an annual budget of $10 million.
May was honoured at the society's 40th anniversary last year.In 1961 she revitalized a Pensioners' Club in the basement of the city's oldest Anglican church, then and still located in one of the poorest neighbourhoods of the city.
Her work with pensioners was soon followed with the formation of an emergency hostel for women, a sheltered workshop, legal aid, the conversion of a hotel to a residence for alcoholics and later the mentally ill, an intermediate care facility for seniors, a recycling project, a hospice, and other services.Nearly the entire city block on which St. James Church stands now houses society agencies.
May Gutteridge, 1917-2002
Born May 21, 1917, in Gosport, Hampshire, England, the daughter of Ernest and Polly Symonds, May was a WREN during the Second World War.
Diocese of New Westminster - Anglican Church of Canada
www.vancouver.anglican.org, 22 July 2001 [cached]
May Gutteridge, founder of the St. James Service Society, diesDiocese of New Westminster - Anglican Church of Canada
...
The grit of May Gutteridge
...
May Gutteridge, founder of the St. James Service Society, dies.
The organization she began in the basement of St. James, Vancouver, now helps thousands.
MAY C. GUTTERIDGE, member of the Order of Canada, founder of the St. James Community Service Society on the Downtown East Side of Vancouver, died February 26 in the Palliative Care Ward at UBC Hospital following a three-month illness.She was 84.
From work in the basement of St. James Anglican Church at 303 East Cordova Street, St. James Community Service Society has grown to become one of the largest social service agencies in Vancouver, with 250 employees who help about 2,000 people each month, with an annual budget of $10 million.
May was honoured at the society's 40th anniversary last year.In 1961 she revitalized a Pensioners' Club in the basement of the city's oldest Anglican church, then and still located in one of the poorest neighbourhoods of the city.
Her work with pensioners was soon followed with the formation of an emergency hostel for women, a sheltered workshop, legal aid, the conversion of a hotel to a residence for alcoholics and later the mentally ill, an intermediate care facility for seniors, a recycling project, a hospice, and other services.Nearly the entire city block on which St. James Church stands now houses society agencies.
May Gutteridge, 1917-2002
Born May 21, 1917, in Gosport, Hampshire, England, the daughter of Ernest and Polly Symonds, May was a WREN during the Second World War.
Message from the Executive Director
www.sjcss.com, 31 Mar 2002 [cached]
One of the pivotal events that brought us all together was the death of our founder, Dr. May Gutteridge.Last year we commented on the impending construction of Somerville Place.This building was completed in February 2002 and was officially opened in May.The occasion was highlighted by the presence of Archbishop David Somerville, and his wife, for whom the building is named.
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