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2016-06-15T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Max Sherman?

Dr. Max Sherman H.

Senior Scientist

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Direct Phone: (510) ***-****       

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Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1 Cyclotron Road 171

Berkeley, California 94720

United States

Company Description

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been a leader in science and engineering research for more than 70 years, and is the oldest of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories. Berkeley Lab is managed by the University of California, operat ... more

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Background Information

Affiliations

Fellow
ISIAQ

Assistant Secretary
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

Member
TC

Distinguished Lecturer
American Society of Heating , Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers

Education

Ph.D.

Ph.D.

physics

Berkeley

Web References (170 Total References)


Dr. Max Sherman, a physicist ...

business.panasonic.com [cached]

Dr. Max Sherman, a physicist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, and former chair of the ASHRAE 62.2 (link) committee, describes some common sources of indoor pollution in Fine Homebuilding magazine (link) as things that come from cans and bottles (like gasoline, paint strippers, cleaning supplies, and - ironically - 'air fresheners'), building materials, biologicals, and smoke.

Lstiburek describes many indoor pollutants that come from building materials as happening ""when things that get really hot, really wet, or exposed to ultraviolet light,"" and he calls these three items 'damage functions.' As heat, moisture, and UV act on building materials, the materials break down into contaminants in the form of gasses and particles.


Dr. Max Sherman, a physicist ...

business.panasonic.com [cached]

Dr. Max Sherman, a physicist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, and former chair of the ASHRAE 62.2 (link) committee, describes some common sources of indoor pollution in Fine Homebuilding magazine (link) as things that come from cans and bottles (like gasoline, paint strippers, cleaning supplies, and - ironically - 'air fresheners'), building materials, biologicals, and smoke.

Lstiburek describes many indoor pollutants that come from building materials as happening ""when things that get really hot, really wet, or exposed to ultraviolet light,"" and he calls these three items 'damage functions.' As heat, moisture, and UV act on building materials, the materials break down into contaminants in the form of gasses and particles.


ASHRAE L.I. Next Meeting

www.ashraeli.org [cached]

Max Sherman

...
Max Sherman, Ph.D.
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
...
Dr. Max Sherman is a Staff Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and is senior advisor on residential matters. His research career spans over 35 years and 200 publications, most of which focus on buildings, energy efficiency, IAQ and HVAC. His most recognized research areas also include ventilation, thermal distribution systems, infiltration, IAQ and envelope-dominated buildings. He gives technical lectures frequently and has appeared in the popular media on issues of energy, ventilation and duct tape.
Dr. Sherman was one of the youngest to be made an ASHRAE Fellow and has had a distin-guished career since being elevated including winning the Holladay Distinguished Fellow award-Society's highest technical level. He has received the Exceptional Achievement award and most recently the Standards Achievement award. He has chaired SPC 62.2, the committee which developed ASHRAE's residential ventilation standard. He served as a Director-At-Large for the Soci-ety in 2001-2004 as well as numerous councils and committees. He continues to be an active member of ASHRAE including work on SSPC 62.2 and international activities. He currently chairs the Presidential Ad-hoc committee on the Residential Market.


ASHRAE L.I. Next Meeting

ashraeli.org [cached]

Max Sherman

...
Max Sherman, Ph.D.
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
...
Dr. Max Sherman is a Staff Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and is senior advisor on residential matters. His research career spans over 35 years and 200 publications, most of which focus on buildings, energy efficiency, IAQ and HVAC. His most recognized research areas also include ventilation, thermal distribution systems, infiltration, IAQ and envelope-dominated buildings. He gives technical lectures frequently and has appeared in the popular media on issues of energy, ventilation and duct tape.
Dr. Sherman was one of the youngest to be made an ASHRAE Fellow and has had a distin-guished career since being elevated including winning the Holladay Distinguished Fellow award-Society's highest technical level. He has received the Exceptional Achievement award and most recently the Standards Achievement award. He has chaired SPC 62.2, the committee which developed ASHRAE's residential ventilation standard. He served as a Director-At-Large for the Soci-ety in 2001-2004 as well as numerous councils and committees. He continues to be an active member of ASHRAE including work on SSPC 62.2 and international activities. He currently chairs the Presidential Ad-hoc committee on the Residential Market.


Leaky ductwork is an energy hog ...

www.climatecontrolme.com [cached]

Leaky ductwork is an energy hog that is hidden from view - or at least that's how Max Sherman, a Senior Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in the United States, describes the problem in his article, "Billions in Lost Energy Leaking Out of Home Heating & Cooling Ducts", which the laboratory published in March 20011.

...
Delayed detection of duct leakage is a pervasive problem, one that both Naumov and Al Bargouthi attribute to the fact that leaks are - as Sherman put it - hidden from view.
...
That will certainly be a positive change, for as Sherman also states in his 14-year-old article, better ductwork is a win for everyone.

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