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2011-05-10T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Max Coats?

Dr. Max Coats Jr.

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Background Information

Employment History

Johne's Disease Module

Deputy Director for Animal Health Programs

Animal Ag

Director USDA HPAI Office -Jakarta Indonesia

USDA

Deputy Director for Epidemiology and Laboratories

Texas Animal Health Commission

Deputy Director

Texas Animal Health Commission

Education

DVM

MSc

Web References (199 Total References)


"Its unpredictability is the only ...

www.chronofhorse.com [cached]

"Its unpredictability is the only predictable thing about it," said Dr. Max Coats, the deputy director for Animal Health Programs for the Texas Animal Health Commission. Coats has spent much of 2004 dealing with this most recent outbreak of VSV, which turned up in Texas in May.


Nine premises remain under quarantine in ...

www.thehorse.com [cached]

Nine premises remain under quarantine in Texas due to vesicular stomatitis (VS), says Max Coats, DVM, MSc, deputy director for Animal Health Programs for the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC). In mid-July, the TAHC, Breeders' Cup, and other... Read full story

...
Nine premises remain under quarantine in Texas due to vesicular stomatitis (VS), according to Max Coats, DVM, MSc, deputy director for Animal Health Programs for the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC). On July 13, Breeders' Cup, the TAHC, and... Read full story


Nine premises remain under quarantine in ...

www.thehorse.com [cached]

Nine premises remain under quarantine in Texas due to vesicular stomatitis (VS), says Max Coats, DVM, MSc, deputy director for Animal Health Programs for the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC). In mid-July, the TAHC, Breeders' Cup, and other... Read full story Vesicular Stomatitis Continues Northward Drift

...
Nine premises remain under quarantine in Texas due to vesicular stomatitis (VS), according to Max Coats, DVM, MSc, deputy director for Animal Health Programs for the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC). On July 13, Breeders' Cup, the TAHC, and... Read full story Premises Quarantined in Three States Due to VS


Texas Horsemen's Partnership Home Page

www.texashorsemen.com [cached]

"We always launch a disease investigation when blisters or sores are reported in livestock, to determine if foot-and-mouth disease has been introduced into the U.S.," said Dr. Max Coats, deputy director for Animal Health Programs for the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC), the state's livestock and poultry health regulatory agency. "Because horses are not susceptible to FMD, we knew, in this case, that the animals had vesicular stomatitis (VS), or possibly had come in contact with poison or a toxic plant. The National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, has confirmed that the three horses in Reeves County have VS."

Dr. Coats said researchers have determined that VS outbreaks are started by a virus transmitted by arthropods, such as ticks, mites, biting midges, mosquitoes or house flies. Following an incubation period of two to eight days, infected animals may develop clinical signs of disease. The outbreak then can be perpetuated by biting insects that carry the disease from infected to healthy livestock. VS-infected animals also can spread the virus if their saliva or the fluid from ruptured blisters contaminates equipment or feed shared by herd mates. Sick animals should be isolated until they heal, he said.
Dr. Coats noted that all livestock on the affected ranch in Reeves County will remain quarantined for several weeks, until they no longer pose a health threat to other livestock. Prior to quarantine release, the animals will be re-examined by a state or federal regulatory veterinarian, to prevent the spread of disease to other premises.
"VS is rarely fatal, and infection usually runs its course in a couple of weeks," commented Dr. Coats.
...
Humans reportedly may contract VS and develop flu-like symptoms that can last four to seven days," warned Dr. Coats.
"If your livestock develops blisters, erosions or sores, don't pass it off as another case of VS," Dr. Coats said. "It is extremely important that we collect samples and have laboratory tests run to determine the cause of illness. Report these signs of disease to your private veterinary practitioner or the TAHC immediately. The TAHC hotline number is operational 24 hours a day at 1-800-550-8242, and a TAHC or U.S. Department of Agriculture veterinarian always is on call to take reports and work with your private veterinarian at no charge."
"If you plan to ship horses or other livestock out of state, contact the state of destination prior to transporting the animals," urged Dr. Coats.


Texas Horsemen's Partnership Home Page

www.texashorsemen.com [cached]

"Nationally, we're seeing fewer cases than in l997, when the disease was confirmed on 380 premises before the outbreak ended in late fall," said Dr. Max Coats, deputy director for Animal Health Programs for the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC), the state's livestock and poultry health regulatory agency. "I don't recall Texas ever having this many confirmed cases - a total of 11 so far -- or seeing them as far east as Starr County. Usually, Texas' lone case or two is detected in far west Texas."

"Even though the case numbers have remained fairly low, some states receiving livestock have imposed movement restrictions or testing requirements, as a precaution against potential disease spread," said Dr. Coats.
...
"Please report signs of illness in livestock that resemble vesicular stomatitis," urged Dr. Coats. "These can include blisters or erosions in an animal's mouth or on the muzzle, on the teats, or above the hooves. VS can affect horses and other equine animals, cattle, deer, goats, swine and a number of other animals. Tests will be run at no charge to the owner, so that we can ensure that we are, in fact, dealing with VS, and not the highly dangerous foot-and-mouth disease, which exhibits similar signs of disease in cloven-hooved animals. Dr. Coats noted that horses and other equine animals are not susceptible to foot-and-mouth disease, but tests can rule out other causes of illness, such as poison, toxic plants or other diseases.

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