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Wrong Max Coats?

Max Coats

Director USDA HPAI Office -Jakarta Indonesia

U.S. Department of Agriculture

HQ Phone:  (202) 720-2791

Email: m***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

1400 Independence Avenue, S.W.

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20250

United States

Company Description

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-...more

Background Information

Employment History

Deputy Director

Texas Animal Health Commission


Web References(193 Total References)


www.acnedai.com

Max Coats, the USDA director for Indonesia, said cooperation among all stakeholders, including the government, was needed to spread information to the public about the threat of the bird flu virus.The quick spread of the H5N1 bird flu virus meant action had to be taken quickly, he said.Indonesia has recorded 69 bird flu deaths, the highest figure for any country.Coats said many Indonesians were well educated about the virus, but that they were outnumbered by those who still knew little about it.


www.tpma.org [cached]

"Stock covered by the breeding cattle testing and identification requirement include weaned heifers, bred heifers, cows and bulls intended for breeding purposes," explained Dr. Max Coats, assistant executive director for the Texas Animal Health Commission, the state's livestock health regulatory agency."The USDA has delayed until January 1, 2003, additional restrictions onmoving feeder cattle out of the state.Feeder animals include steers, bull calves and heifers destined for grazing and feeding for slaughter.""We've worked to prepare Texas cattle producers for the impact of this regulation change for several months and have conferred frequently with related industry associations.Brochures outlining the changes in the testing requirements can be obtained from the TAHC at no charge," said Dr. Coats."This new federal regulation will require ranchers to plan ahead before selling or moving their breeding cattle out of state," he said."Ranchers may find their breeding cattle to be more marketable if the animals are tested prior to arrival at the livestock market.Untested breeding cattle and bison will be restricted to movement only within the state or directly to a slaughter plant, unless a buyer makes arrangement to have the animals held and tested after the sale.Ranchers will be responsible for paying their USDA accredited, private veterinary practitioners for testing."To conduct a TB skin test, an accredited veterinarian injects a tiny amount of tuberculin into the animal's skin near its tail, in an area called the "caudal fold."After a 72-hour waiting period, Dr. Coats said the veterinarian examines the site for swelling that might indicate the animal has been exposed to cattle TB.If there is no response, the accredited veterinarian can issue a document as proof of testing, recording on it the test results and the animal's official identification--either a brucellosis ear tag, or for purebred cattle, a firebrand or tattoo registered with the breed."About one percent of the 'caudal fold' tests will be positive, and this is expected, as there can be false-positive test results," noted Dr. Coats."If this occurs, a state or federal veterinarian must run a second test within 10 days.This 'comparative cervical' test, run on the animal's neck, also requires a 72-hour waiting period, and if it is negative, the animal can move freely.A positive test, however, is strong indication the animal may have cattle TB, and it must be slaughtered and carefully examined for internal TB lesions.Tissue samples will be collected and forwarded to the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, for laboratory confirmation.""There are three exceptions to the TB testing requirements for breeding cattle moving across state lines," said Dr. Coats, who heads up TAHC's field operations and animal health programs."Nursing calves can move without a test, if they accompany their TB-tested dam.Cattle going directly to a slaughter plant from a farm or livestock market don't need a test.Ranchers also can move animals freely from a TB accredited-free herd, a status gained through annual herd testing."(Dr. Coats advised producers to call the TAHC at 1-800-550-8242 for information about the TB accreditation program.)"We are working with the USDA, states that receive our cattle, and the livestock industry to develop a plan for adequately identifying feeder steers and spayed heifers moving out of Texas on or after January 1, 2003," said Dr. Coats."We continue to wrestle with how to handle feeder heifers and bull calves after that date, as these animals could be selected for breeding purposes after being moved out of state.As quickly as possible, we will provide additional guidelines regarding the movement of these animals."Dr. Coats explained that Texas initially earned Accredited-Free status for cattle TB in November 2000, with the exception of El Paso and Hudspeth Counties, which were "zoned out" by the USDA, due to low levels of infection that recurred in several large dairies in the area.For purposes of cattle movement and cattle TB eradication, he said Texas will remain "split," as El Paso and Hudspeth Counties cannot apply for Accredited-Free status until at least three years after its dairies are depopulated and no additional infection is detected.On the other hand, he noted, the state's other 252 counties may reapply to the USDA for TB Accredited-Free status in two years, if no more infected herds are found.The USDA is accepting public comments on the US cattle TB regulations until August 5.A copy of the regulation downgrading Texas' cattle TB status and instructions for submitting comments may be obtained on the internet at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ppd/rad/webrepor.html, or by calling the USDA's Regulatory Analysis and Development at 301-734-8682. -30- Agriculture, Texas


nocona.hypermart.net [cached]

"Stock covered by the breeding cattle testing and identification requirement include weaned heifers, bred heifers, cows and bulls intended for breeding purposes," explained Dr. Max Coats, assistant executive director for the Texas Animal Health Commission, the state's livestock health regulatory agency."The USDA has delayed until January 1, 2003, additional restrictions onmoving feeder cattle out of the state.Feeder animals include steers, bull calves and heifers destined for grazing and feeding for slaughter." "We've worked to prepare Texas cattle producers for the impact of this regulation change for several months and have conferred frequently with related industry associations.Brochures outlining the changes in the testing requirements can be obtained from the TAHC at no charge," said Dr. Coats. "This new federal regulation will require ranchers to plan ahead before selling or moving their breeding cattle out of state," he said."Ranchers may find their breeding cattle to be more marketable if the animals are tested prior to arrival at the livestock market.Untested breeding cattle and bison will be restricted to movement only within the state or directly to a slaughter plant, unless a buyer makes arrangement to have the animals held and tested after the sale.Ranchers will be responsible for paying their USDA accredited, private veterinary practitioners for testing." To conduct a TB skin test, an accredited veterinarian injects a tiny amount of tuberculin into the animal's skin near its tail, in an area called the "caudal fold."After a 72-hour waiting period, Dr. Coats said the veterinarian examines the site for swelling that might indicate the animal has been exposed to cattle TB.If there is no response, the accredited veterinarian can issue a document as proof of testing, recording on it the test results and the animal's official identification--either a brucellosis ear tag, or for purebred cattle, a firebrand or tattoo registered with the breed. "About one percent of the 'caudal fold' tests will be positive, and this is expected, as there can be false-positive test results," noted Dr. Coats."If this occurs, a state or federal veterinarian must run a second test within 10 days.This 'comparative cervical' test, run on the animal's neck, also requires a 72-hour waiting period, and if it is negative, the animal can move freely.A positive test, however, is strong indication the animal may have cattle TB, and it must be slaughtered and carefully examined for internal TB lesions.Tissue samples will be collected and forwarded to the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, for laboratory confirmation." "There are three exceptions to the TB testing requirements for breeding cattle moving across state lines," said Dr. Coats, who heads up TAHC's field operations and animal health programs."Nursing calves can move without a test, if they accompany their TB-tested dam.Cattle going directly to a slaughter plant from a farm or livestock market don't need a test.Ranchers also can move animals freely from a TB accredited-free herd, a status gained through annual herd testing."(Dr. Coats advised producers to call the TAHC at 1-800-550-8242 for information about the TB accreditation program.) "We are working with the USDA, states that receive our cattle, and the livestock industry to develop a plan for adequately identifying feeder steers and spayed heifers moving out of Texas on or after January 1, 2003," said Dr. Coats."We continue to wrestle with how to handle feeder heifers and bull calves after that date, as these animals could be selected for breeding purposes after being moved out of state.As quickly as possible, we will provide additional guidelines regarding the movement of these animals." Dr. Coats explained that Texas initially earned Accredited-Free status for cattle TB in November 2000, with the exception of El Paso and Hudspeth Counties, which were "zoned out" by the USDA, due to low levels of infection that recurred in several large dairies in the area.For purposes of cattle movement and cattle TB eradication, he said Texas will remain "split," as El Paso and Hudspeth Counties cannot apply for Accredited-Free status until at least three years after its dairies are depopulated and no additional infection is detected.On the other hand, he noted, the state's other 252 counties may reapply to the USDA for TB Accredited-Free status in two years, if no more infected herds are found. The USDA is accepting public comments on the US cattle TB regulations until August 5.A copy of the regulation downgrading Texas' cattle TB status and instructions for submitting comments may be obtained on the internet at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ppd/rad/webrepor.html, or by calling the USDA's Regulatory Analysis and Development at 301-734-8682. Texas Animal Health CommissionNews Release ArchivesWebpage offermain page | business listings | employers | events | stats | history | schools | links Copyrighted© 2000/2009 - Nocona Chamber of Commerce


www.johnesdisease.org [cached]

Max Coats ph: (512) 719-0700 fax: (512) 719-0721 mcoats@tahc.state.tx.us


www.cocka2.com [cached]

"We feel we have adequate evidence that the disease is no longer a threat to the area," said Max Coats Jr., deputy executive director and state veterinarian with the Texas Animal Health Commission.
DNA tests found that the strain of the disease in El Paso didn't match the strain in California but rather a strain found in Mexico three years ago, Coats said.


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