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Wrong Matthew Palmatier?

Matthew Palmatier

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Kansas State University

HQ Phone:  (785) 532-6266

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Kansas State University

1800 Denison Avenue

Manhattan, Kansas,66506

United States

Company Description

Kansas State University (K-State) was founded in 1863 as the nation's first operational land-grant university. K-State researchers work to decode nature and improve lives-advancing the forefront of global food systems, biosciences, and animal health by using a...more

Web References(13 Total References)


Smoking Research Archives - ciggyfree.com

www.ciggyfree.com [cached]

"People have very regimented things they do when they smoke," said Matthew Palmatier, assistant professor of psychology at K-State.
Palmatier said much previous research on nicotine addiction has looked at the drug itself rather than the other factors he is studying. "The approach we're taking is out of left field," he said. "But it seems to be one of the best explanations as to why people smoke." Palmatier has a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to understand how this phenomenon can be used to better design tobacco addiction treatments, usually offered in stop smoking aids, like patches and pills. He began psychological research in addiction as a graduate student and later began researching the reinforcing effects of nicotine. Coffee and Cigarettes "The big picture is trying to figure out why people smoke," Palmatier said. By manipulating this signal, Palmatier and his colleagues found that the rats weren't really that interested in nicotine by itself. "We figured out that what the rats really liked was turning the light off," Palmatier said. "They still self-administered the nicotine, but they took more of the drug when it was associated with a reinforcing light." Palmatier and colleagues published a paper on their research in the August issue of Neuropsychopharmacology. Palmatier has begun looking at how rats respond to sweet tastes after having nicotine. He said preliminary results show that nicotine has comparable effects on sweet tastes. That is, rats respond more for sugar-water solutions after getting nicotine. "The taste aspect is really important because we can actually figure out how nicotine is increasing the subjects' behavior," Palmatier said. "If it makes a reward more pleasurable, then it may increase the palatability of a sweet taste." Palmatier said that a future phase of research would be determining whether nicotine can make unpleasant experiences more tolerable, helping explain why lighting up after a bad day at work can be tempting.


Zero Exposure Project - Article Details

www.zeroexposure.org [cached]

"People have very regimented things they do when they smoke," said Matthew Palmatier, assistant professor of psychology at K-State.
Palmatier said much previous research on nicotine addiction has looked at the drug itself rather than the other factors he is studying. "The approach we're taking is out of left field," he said. "But it seems to be one of the best explanations as to why people smoke." Palmatier has a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to understand how this phenomenon can be used to better design tobacco addiction treatments, usually offered in patches and pills. He began psychological research in addiction as a graduate student and later began researching the reinforcing effects of nicotine. "The big picture is trying to figure out why people smoke," Palmatier said. By manipulating this signal, Palmatier and his colleagues found that the rats weren't really that interested in nicotine by itself. "We figured out that what the rats really liked was turning the light off," Palmatier said. "They still self-administered the nicotine, but they took more of the drug when it was associated with a reinforcing light." Palmatier and colleagues published a paper on their research in the August issue of Neuropsychopharmacology. Palmatier has begun looking at how rats respond to sweet tastes after having nicotine. He said preliminary results show that nicotine has comparable effects on sweet tastes. That is, rats respond more for sugar-water solutions after getting nicotine. "The taste aspect is really important because we can actually figure out how nicotine is increasing the subjects' behavior," Palmatier said. "If it makes a reward more pleasurable, then it may increase the palatability of a sweet taste." Palmatier said that a future phase of research would be determining whether nicotine can make unpleasant experiences more tolerable, helping explain why lighting up after a bad day at work can be tempting.


Kansas Public Radio 91.5 - public radio from the University of Kansas

www.kansaspublicradio.org [cached]

As part of our series, "Kansas Health: A Prescription for Change", Health Reporter Bryan Thompson spoke with Kansas State University psychology professor Matthew Palmatier(Pahl-muh-TEER) about why lifestyle change is such a challenge for so many people.
Matthew Palmatier teaches psychology at Kansas State University. Matthew Palmatier - Kansas State University Palmatier-smoking research


mountainview.myzen.co.uk

Matthew Palmatier, assistant professor of psychology at Kansas State University says that Cigarettes are so hard to quit because of the way they enhance other activities.
He suggests that this may be why smoking becomes a habitual part of, for example, consuming coffee.


Tobacco.org : Welcome

www.tobacco.org [cached]

Matthew Palmatier, assistant professor of psychology at Kansas State University.» Cigarettes' Power May Not Be In Nicotine Itself, New Study Suggests, ScienceDaily Magazine (Thursday, September 4, 2008)


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