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This profile was last updated on 5/27/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Matthew Palmatier

Wrong Matthew Palmatier?
Phone: (785) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: m***@***.edu
Kansas State University
2021 Throckmorton Hall
Manhattan , Kansas 66506
United States

Company Description: Founded in 1863, K-State was one of America's first land-grant colleges. K-State ranks first nationally among state universities in its total of Rhodes, Marshall,...   more
Background

Employment History

  • Assistant Professor of Psychology
    K-State
17 Total References
Web References
Cigarettes' Power May Not Be In Nicotine Itself, New Study Suggests
www.smoke4sale.com, 2 Dec 2008 [cached]
"People have very regimented things they do when they smoke," said Matthew Palmatier, assistant professor of psychology at K-State. "If you think about where people smoke or who they smoke with, you realize that it occurs in very specific places, often with a specific group of people. Maybe it's a reason why nicotine is so addictive - if you get used to having that extra satisfaction from things you nor Mally enjoy, not having nicotine could Reduce the enjoyment in a given activity. "People may not be smoking to obtain a pleasurable drug state. They may be smoking in order to regulate their mood, and that effect could make nicotine More addictive than other drugs. Palmatier said much previous research on nicotine addiction has looked at the drug itself rather than the other factors he is studying. "The approach we're taking is out of left field," he said. "But it seems to be one of the best explanations as to why people smoke. Palmatier has a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to understand how this phenomenon can be used to better design tobacco addiction treatments, usually offe Red in patches and pills. He began psychological research in addiction as a graduate student and later began researching the reinforcing effects of nicotine. "The big picture is trying to figure out why people smoke," Palmatier said. "There are a lot of health risks, and the majority of smokers already know what they are. They want to quit but can't. It's not because nicotine is a potent drug; it doesn't induce significant amounts of pleasure or euphoria. Yet, it's just as difficult if not More difficult to quit than other drugs. At K-State, Palmatier studies rats that are allowed to self-administer nicotine by pushing a lever. The main source of light in their testing environment shuts off when the rats earn a dose of nicotine. After about a minute, the light comes back on to signal that More nicotine is available. By manipulating this signal, Palmatier and his colleagues found that the rats weren't really that interested in nicotine by itself. "We figu Red out that what the rats really liked was turning the light off," Palmatier said. "They still self-administeRed the nicotine, but they took More of the drug when it was associated with a reinforcing light. Palmatier and colleagues published a paper on their research in the August issue of Neuropsychopharmacology. Palmatier has begun looking at how rats respond to sweet tastes after having nicotine. He said preliminary results show that nicotine has comparable effects on sweet tastes. That is, rats respond More for sugar-water solutions after getting nicotine. "The taste aspect is really important because we can actually figure out how nicotine is increasing the subjects' behavior," Palmatier said. "If it makes a reward More pleasurable, then it may increase the palatability of a sweet taste. Palmatier said that a future phase of research would be determining whether nicotine can make unpleasant experiences More tolerable, helping explain why lighting up after a bad day at work can be tempting.
"People have very regimented things they ...
www.eurekalert.org, 3 Sept 2008 [cached]
"People have very regimented things they do when they smoke," said Matthew Palmatier, assistant professor of psychology at K-State.
...
Palmatier said much previous research on nicotine addiction has looked at the drug itself rather than the other factors he is studying.
"The approach we're taking is out of left field," he said."But it seems to be one of the best explanations as to why people smoke."
Palmatier has a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to understand how this phenomenon can be used to better design tobacco addiction treatments, usually offered in patches and pills.He began psychological research in addiction as a graduate student and later began researching the reinforcing effects of nicotine.
"The big picture is trying to figure out why people smoke," Palmatier said.
...
By manipulating this signal, Palmatier and his colleagues found that the rats weren't really that interested in nicotine by itself.
"We figured out that what the rats really liked was turning the light off," Palmatier said."They still self-administered the nicotine, but they took more of the drug when it was associated with a reinforcing light."
Palmatier and colleagues published a paper on their research in the August issue of Neuropsychopharmacology.
Palmatier has begun looking at how rats respond to sweet tastes after having nicotine.He said preliminary results show that nicotine has comparable effects on sweet tastes.That is, rats respond more for sugar-water solutions after getting nicotine.
"The taste aspect is really important because we can actually figure out how nicotine is increasing the subjects' behavior," Palmatier said."If it makes a reward more pleasurable, then it may increase the palatability of a sweet taste."
Palmatier said that a future phase of research would be determining whether nicotine can make unpleasant experiences more tolerable, helping explain why lighting up after a bad day at work can be tempting.
Matthew Palmatier, assistant ...
mountainview.myzen.co.uk [cached]
Matthew Palmatier, assistant professor of psychology at Kansas State University says that Cigarettes are so hard to quit because of the way they enhance other activities. He suggests that this may be why smoking becomes a habitual part of, for example, consuming coffee.
Kansas Public Radio 91.5 - public radio from the University of Kansas
www.kansaspublicradio.org, 18 Jan 2010 [cached]
As part of our series, "Kansas Health: A Prescription for Change", Health Reporter Bryan Thompson spoke with Kansas State University psychology professor Matthew Palmatier(Pahl-muh-TEER) about why lifestyle change is such a challenge for so many people.
...
Matthew Palmatier teaches psychology at Kansas State University.
...
Matthew Palmatier - Kansas State University Palmatier-smoking research
Tobacco.org : Welcome
www.tobacco.org, 7 Dec 2007 [cached]
Matthew Palmatier, assistant professor of psychology at Kansas State University.» Cigarettes' Power May Not Be In Nicotine Itself, New Study Suggests, ScienceDaily Magazine (Thursday, September 4, 2008)
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