logo

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Matthew Guglielmetti?

Matthew L. Guglielmetti

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Union Steward

Capital City Concrete


Silent Partner

Hemphill Construction


Affiliations

New England Mafia

Notorious Member


Laborers' International Union of North America

Member


La Cosa Nostra

Member


Local 271

Member


Web References(18 Total References)


mafia.wikia.com

In 1989, while the Patriarca family was in the midst of an internal factional war, Guglielmetti came to the attention of law enforcement authorities when it was discovered that he had attempted to act as a peace broker.
In return for his efforts, he inherited the rackets previously overseen by the murdered underboss William Grasso. On October 20, 1989, Guglielmetti was recorded by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) while the Patriarca family conducted a Mafia induction ceremony in Medford, Massachusetts.[1] As a result, Guglielmetti ended up doing nearly five years at a federal prison in Sandstone, Minnesota during the 1990s after pleading guilty to federal racketeering charges in Hartford, Connecticut. After his release, he resumed his criminal activities and soon presided over gambling and loan sharking for the Patriarca family. At the time, Guglielmetti served as steward for Laborers' International Union of North America (LIUNA) Local 271. After Hemphill opened, an undercover FBI agent met with Guglielmetti and offered him the chance to buy into the company. According to an FBI affidavit, Guglielmetti became a silent partner in Hemphill and started taking company funds, "including a share of the profits from laundering what Guglielmetti believed were drug proceeds through the undercover business." In 2003, Guglielmetti served as union steward for Capital City Concrete, which was chosen as a minority contractor for a $5.8 million parking ramp at the Kent County Court House in Warwick, Rhode Island. The company was also selected for $7 million in contract work on a sewage overflow tunnel at Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island. As work on the Warwick ramp progressed, state court officials pressed local contractors for payroll records in order to conduct criminal background checks on their employees. Capital City was among the last contractors to comply with this request. About a week before Guglielmetti stopped working on the ramp, Capital City finally turned over the records. Nothing emerged in the state files - apparently, Guglielmetti had unspecified charges expunged. In October 2003, Rhode Island and Massachusetts police visited the Warwick construction site to tell Guglielmetti that he and Manocchio had been recorded on undercover wiretaps discussing the collection of gambling debts and the mediation of a mob dispute. On January 20, 2005, FBI agents and Rhode Island State Police detectives raided the headquarters of Local 271 and Capital City Concrete in Cranston. Earlier that day, Guglielmetti and a pair of associates were arrested in Johnston. On March 31, 2005, Matthew Guglielmetti signed a plea agreement admitting that he conspired to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine. Later in 2005, Guglielmetti was sentenced to 11 years in prison.


www.drugrehabrhodeisland.com [cached]

Rhode Island: Guglielmetti pleads guilty to cocaine trafficking
PROVIDENCE -- Matthew L. Guglielmetti, a high-ranking mobster at the center of a federal corruption investigation of the Rhode Island construction industry and the Laborers' International union, pleaded guilty today to federal cocaine trafficking charges. But the man described by prosecutors as a capo regime in the Patriarca crime family is not cooperating with the feds, his lawyer made clear afterwards, despite any "street talk'' to the contrary. Guglielmetti, 56, will be sentenced Aug. 11. He faces a possible 12-year prison term under a plea agreement he signed with federal prosecutors in March. He wore the khaki prison garb of the federal Wyatt Detention Center in Central Falls, where he has been since his arrest on Jan. 20, the same day that FBI agents and state police detectives raided offices of the Laborers' union in Providence and Capital City Concrete in Cranston. Guglielmetti, who presided over gambling and loan-sharking for the New England Mafia, has been a member of Laborers Local 271. In 2003, he served as union steward for Capital City Concrete during construction of a parking garage for the new Kent County Courthouse in Warwick. He also was a silent partner in a Johnston company, Hemphill Construction, that turned out to be a front for the FBI as it probed the local construction industry for nearly three years. Guglielmetti also thought that Hemphill was used to launder drug money. As part of the deal, the government agreed not to charge Guglielmetti with further crimes involving his "association and involvement'' with Hemphill. Guglielmetti, who did nearly five years in prison in the 1990s after pleading guilty to federal racketeering charges in Hartford, Conn., was stoic today. At one point he looked at the reporters in the courtroom and asked his lawyer, ``Where's Jack White?'', referring to Channel 12's veteran mob reporter, who was not there. PROVIDENCE -- Matthew L. Guglielmetti, a high...


www.thelaborers.net [cached]

Guglielmetti pleads guilty to cocaine trafficking
PROVIDENCE -- Matthew L. Guglielmetti, a high-ranking mobster at the center of a federal corruption investigation of the Rhode Island construction industry and the Laborers' International union, pleaded guilty today to federal cocaine trafficking charges. But the man described by prosecutors as a capo regime in the Patriarca crime family is not cooperating with the feds, his lawyer made clear afterwards, despite any "street talk'' to the contrary. Guglielmetti, 56, will be sentenced Aug. 11. He faces a possible 12-year prison term under a plea agreement he signed with federal prosecutors in March. He wore the khaki prison garb of the federal Wyatt Detention Center in Central Falls, where he has been since his arrest on Jan. 20, the same day that FBI agents and state police detectives raided offices of the Laborers' union in Providence and Capital City Concrete in Cranston. Guglielmetti, who presided over gambling and loan-sharking for the New England Mafia, has been a member of Laborers Local 271. In 2003, he served as union steward for Capital City Concrete during construction of a parking garage for the new Kent County Courthouse in Warwick. He also was a silent partner in a Johnston company, Hemphill Construction, that turned out to be a front for the FBI as it probed the local construction industry for nearly three years. Guglielmetti also thought that Hemphill was used to launder drug money. As part of the deal, the government agreed not to charge Guglielmetti with further crimes involving his "association and involvement'' with Hemphill. Guglielmetti, who did nearly five years in prison in the 1990s after pleading guilty to federal racketeering charges in Hartford, Conn., was stoic today. At one point he looked at the reporters in the courtroom and asked his lawyer, ``Where's Jack White?'', referring to Channel 12's veteran mob reporter, who was not there.


www.laborers.com [cached]

A federal grand jury yesterday indicted mobster Matthew L. Guglielmetti Jr. and two associates for cocaine-trafficking conspiracy.The indictment comes a week after authorities arrested the three men as part of a larger probe that has touched on organized crime, a local union and a Cranston concrete company.Guglielmetti, 56, a capo regime in the Patriarca crime family, was charged with arranging to protect a large shipment of cocaine that was passing through Rhode Island en route to Canada.The probe centered around an undercover agent who posed as a businessman and operated an unidentified business with Guglielmetti, who was a silent partner.Last November, during the investigation, Guglielmetti told his undercover FBI business partner that he needed to make some cash for Christmas.According to the FBI affidavit, the mobster and the agent then hatched a scheme in which Guglielmetti would be paid $1,000 per kilo for "baby-sitting" 67 kilos of cocaine; they also discussed laundering at least half the proceeds once the cocaine was sold in Canada.The deal came together the night of Jan. 18, when Blamires and Moscarelli, allegedly acting on orders from Guglielmetti, went to a Rhode Island hotel room where 67 kilos of cocaine were hidden in two suitcases, accompanied by two purported drug traffickers who were undercover FBI agents.The four men allegedly remained in the hotel room together, with the cocaine, for five hours, while Guglielmetti waited at another hotel with the undercover agent posing as his business partner.At 11 p.m., the undercover agent with Guglielmetti called the other hotel room and told one of the agents there that Blamires and Moscarelli were done.The authorities charge that Guglielmetti subsequently talked by phone with Moscarelli, and that Moscarelli and Blamires then left the hotel room.The three men were arrested last Thursday, after Guglielmetti met with the undercover agent at an unspecified location in Johnston, expecting to collect his money, the government alleges.Guglielmetti, a laborers' union member, worked for Capital City Concrete on that courthouse-related project, as did Albert DeRobbio.


www.laborers.org [cached]

Hours after the arrest of Matthew L. Guglielmetti Jr., 56, on a charge of conspiracy to distribute cocaine, the FBI and state police raid a New England Laborers office and a Cranston concrete company.Matthew L. Guglielmetti Jr., 56, was charged with conspiracy to distribute cocaine.The government accused Guglielmetti of agreeing to protect a major shipment of cocaine that was passing through Rhode Island en route to Canada.According to an FBI affidavit, the drug case grew out of a larger undercover investigation in which an agent posing as a businessman operated a business with Guglielmetti, who was a silent partner.Guglielmetti worked for Capital City Concrete, which employs union construction workers, when the company helped build the parking garage for the planned new Kent County Courthouse over the past few years."During this undercover activity, an FBI undercover agent . . . was introduced to Guglielmetti," the affidavit said."In his undercover role, [the agent] and Guglielmetti operated a business, with Guglielmetti as a silent partner.During the operation of this business, Guglielmetti received money from the business, including a share of the profits from laundering what Guglielmetti believed were drug proceeds through the undercover business."Then, last November, the affidavit said, Guglielmetti met the undercover agent in Johnston and "indicated a need to make some money prior to Christmas."The mobster and the agent discussed having Guglielmetti arrange protection for a large shipment of cocaine that would be passing through Rhode Island from the South, bound for Canada.They also discussed the possibility of laundering the proceeds once the cocaine was distributed.On Dec. 6, according to the affidavit, Guglielmetti met with the agent again and agreed to a payment of $1,000 per kilo for "babysitting" 67 kilos of cocaine; they also discussed laundering at least half the proceeds once the cocaine was sold in Canada.The affidavit said that the conversations were recorded on audiotape, and that some were also secretly videotaped.At a subsequent meeting, on Dec. 13, Guglielmetti told the undercover agent that his "people" would guard the cocaine, and agreed that someone could come and pick up some of the cocaine for local distribution.However, the affidavit quotes Guglielmetti as saying, "I don't want people in and out of there . . . I don't want a guy walking in, taking three, running out, coming back, taking four . . . coming back, taking five, you might as well just hang a sign out and say we're doing drugs."The cocaine shipment was due in Rhode Island this week, the affidavit said, and would be kept at a hotel.On Tuesday of this week, Guglielmetti arranged for two associates he had enlisted to guard the cocaine to meet two other undercover agents, posing as employees of the cocaine supplier, in Johnston.Authorities did not say where in Johnston the meetings took place.Later, between 4 and 5 p.m. on Tuesday, the affidavit said, the original undercover agent met Guglielmetti in Cranston and gave him a key to the hotel room where the cocaine was, and told the mobster to have his two men there by 6 p.m.Shortly after 6 p.m., Guglielmetti's two associates -- who were not named, or arrested yesterday -- arrived at the designated room to find two undercover policemen and 67 kilos of cocaine in suitcases.The four men remained together for about five hours, during which time two more undercover agents came and took 18 kilos, purportedly for distribution in Central Falls.During this time, the affidavit said, Guglielmetti was with the original undercover agent at another hotel.At 11 p.m., the agent called the hotel room with the cocaine and told one of the undercover agents that Guglielmetti's associates were done; Guglielmetti then talked to one of his associates by phone, and he and the other associate left.Yesterday morning, Guglielmetti met with the agent in Johnston to receive payment.Instead, he was arrested.Assistant U.S. Attorney Kenneth P. Madden argued that Guglielmetti is a flight risk and danger to the community, and should be denied bail.Martin ordered Guglielmetti held without bail at the Wyatt Detention Center in Central Falls.While Guglielmetti pleaded guilty, seven others, including mob underboss Nicholas L. Bianco, went to trial.During the trial, evidence surfaced that Bianco had sent Guglielmetti to a Ramada Inn in Mystic, Conn., to meet with mobsters from the Hartford-Springfield area.As part of the plea, Guglielmetti admitted that, on Oct. 29, 1989, he crossed state lines -- traveling from Rhode Island to Massachusetts -- to attend a Mafia induction ceremony in Medford, Mass.In the mid-'90s, Guglielmetti was released from a federal prison in Sandstone, Minn., and returned to Rhode Island.He remained under the watchful eye of law enforcement as he worked jobs as a construction laborer.On July 3, 1997, Guglielmetti was treated for two stab wounds at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island in Pawtucket.He was "very courteous" to the police, but he refused to provide them with any information other than his address and telephone number.Guglielmetti also surfaced on law-enforcement tape recordings in a 2003 federal racketeering and extortion case in Boston.A Massachusetts State Police affidavit identified Guglielmetti as a Rhode Island capo in the Patriarca crime family and Luigi "Baby Shacks" Manocchio, of Providence, as the boss.The affidavit went on to describe Guglielmetti's alleged role in helping to collect a mob gambling debt in New Hampshire and in trying to mediate a dispute among mob soldiers in Massachusetts.In one recorded conversation quoted in the affidavit, Guglielmetti commiserates with two of the Massachusetts wise guys about how their rivals are "throwing fish around" in an apparent death threat reminiscent of the Godfather movies."I went with a broad I had a fish in my door step inside the entry way," says one Massachusetts mobster."That's HBO," responds Guglielmetti."That's the Sopranos," echoes another wise guy.In another recorded conversation, the affidavit said, Guglielmetti lamented that some Mafia members were being promoted simply for their long years of service."So now, I mean it's like, ah, a whore in the neighborhood, you know you stand here long enough we'll use her," said Guglielmetti.Guglielmetti was not charged in that case.But prior to the indictment, Massachusetts and Rhode Island state police did stop by the construction site of the new Kent County Courthouse parking garage, where Guglielmetti was working for Capital City Concrete, to notify him that he had been picked up on the court-authorized recordings.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory