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Foreign Mi Matouq Mohammed Matouq

Wrong Foreign Mi Matouq Mohammed Matouq?
 
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Web References
Nobel Peace Prize tipped to go ...
nucnews.net, 30 Sept 2005 [cached]
Nobel Peace Prize tipped to go to anti-nuclear weapons efforts
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With a record 199 individuals and organizations nominated for the prize this year, the list of possible laureates is long and varied, featuring such names as Irish U2 rock star Bono, the late pope John Paul II and former US secretary of state Colin Powell.
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Many observers however feel this year's prize, which will be announced in Oslo on October 7, will go to a person or a group working to halt nuclear proliferation, and Nihon Hidankyo, a Japanese organization of survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki nuclear bombs, has been tipped as one of the favorites.
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The question of nuclear proliferation has been in the international spotlight over the past year, largely due to thorny negotiations in Iran and North Korea. The International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, which plays a key role in ensuring that nuclear reactors are not used for making weapons of mass destruction, is also on the list of possible candidates. Other potential laureates within the anti-nuclear proliferation field are US Senator Richard Lugar and former Senator Sam Nunn, whose Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) program works to dismantle nuclear missiles and submarines to secure fissile materials in the former Soviet Union.
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The director of the Peace Research Institute (PRIO) in Oslo, Stein Toennesson has tipped the pair for the the Peace Prize for several years now, but others have said they lack the experience of personal suffering in their quest for peace and democracy that marked previous prizewinners, such as Wangari Maathai, Nelson Mandela and Aung San Suu Kyi who all served time in prison.
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"Since the Committee appears in recent years to be reluctant to give the prize to high-profile politicians, Nihon Hidayanko ... would be a good alternative for a prize aimed at the reduction of weapons of mass destruction" Toennesson told AFP.
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Also speaking in favor of this year's Nobel going to Nihon Hidayanko is the fact that Japan last month marked the 60th anniversary since the devastating bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
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Chinese businesswoman and prisoner of conscious Rebiya Kadeer has also been nominated for her work for the rights of the minority Uygur people in China's Xinjiang province, as has British humanitarian organization Oxfam.
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This is Wackenhut, the foreign-owned security firm that guards many army bases and US nuclear facilities, a company that has: * botched security drills at the Nevada nuclear test site * cheated on security drills at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Tennessee * illegally violated whistleblower laws by punishing employees who revealed safety problems at South Texas nuclear facilities * and generally has been found to violate safety standards or failed tests repeatedly. So why does Wackenhut keep getting these security contracts? Because of the usual government revolving door, where ex-government officials leverage their connections to get contracts for substandard privatization.Just look at this list of ex-GOPers on Wackenhut's board:
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Vice-Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in Gulf War, president of one defense contractor and director of several others; paid consultant for Boeing regarding the Air Force's tanker acquisition.
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Assistant Secretary for defense programs at DOE during the Reagan Administration, former Deputy Manager of DOE's Nevada Operations Office, and a member of President Bush's Transition Advisory Team on Energy, where Ken Lay -former CEO of Enron - served as a co-member.
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Australia's science minister Brendan Nelson says there's some merit in former Labor Party Prime Minister Bob Hawke's call for Australia to store the world's nuclear waste.
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Earlier this week, Mr Hawke argued Australia could make a lot of money out of storing the world's nuclear waste and that the income could be spent on environmental problems and given to Aboriginal people.
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The Council Cabinet has accepted the conclusions of a report calling for planners not to wave through nuclear waste plans for Drigg without a far reaching investigation into the legacy of nuclear waste dumped on the site in the 1950s.As a consequence Sellafield operators, British Nuclear Group may be stopped from burying more low-level nuclear waste at Drigg. The county council is worried that rising sea levels could wash the site away, perhaps within 500 years. And it says nobody is sure what radioactive material has been buried there.Councillors have agreed to block any planning applications to expand Drigg until these concerns are satisfied.
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· Energy sources high on government agenda · Oil producing regions too unstable to rely upon
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All but one of the existing ones are due to be decommissioned by 2023.This week Tony Blair told the Labour party conference in Brighton that a successful energy policy required "an assessment of all options, including civil nuclear power".
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Brian Wilson, Labour's energy minister until 2003, said the sale of BN Group would be a logical follow-through from the creation of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, which was set up to deal with the clean-up of Britain's civil nuclear waste.
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Managers privately admit their task, set by government, of becoming a competitive contractor - bidding for work to operate atomic sites and decommission ageing plants - is too onerous without the help of the private sector. The company, which now manages and operates Sellafield and other sites, signalled its willingness to give up on its sprawling empire in July when it unveiled plans to sell-off Westinghouse, the US-based design and construction business it bought in 1999.That company is based in America but it also employs 1,400 British staff at a BNFL site near Preston where it maintains a reactor fuel production facility.A host of American firms such as General Electric have been linked with possible purchase and prices of £1bn and beyond have been bandied around.
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As for the disposal of Westinghouse, he says: "An inquiry should be launched immediately into why six years ago government believed owning Westinghouse was central to its vision for BNFL but today it is peripheral and put up for sale.Nothing has changed except that nuclear new-build is now top of the agenda for fighting carbon emissions. "Westinghouse would provide the UK with a golden opportunity to grab market share and earn a return for the British taxpayer.Instead that long-term vision has been sacrificed to make a quick buck for the Treasury." Exactly the same arguments can be made about the sale of the BN Group which operates and nuclear sites such as Bradwell and Dungeness, although it does not actually own them. Chequered history Originally known as Windscale, Sellafield was built in the late 1940s and began generating electricity at its Calder Hall reactor in 1956.But from the start the plant was plagued by controversy and accidents. During the cold war radio-active waste was discharged from Sellafield via a pipeline directly into the sea. In 1957 a fire broke out in one of the Calder Hall chimneys spreading radioactive waste across Cumbria . The accident was so bad that milk from farms in a 500-square kilometre radius had to be destroyed.In the 1960s a second reactor was added and in 1981 British Nuclear Fuels renamed the plant Sellafield.The Calder Hall reactor was retired in 2003.But although Sellafield was no longer producing electricity it continued to generate headlines. In February 2005 the UK Atomic Energy Authority admitted 29.6 kg of plutonium had gone missing, enough to make seven nuclear bombs. In May, Thorp discovered that 83,000 litres of radioactive waste had leaked from a cracked pipe into a huge stainless steel chamber.The leak had so contaminated the chamber it was impossible to enter and with the cost of the clean up estimated at £2.1bn Thorp was closed. ---- Labour's £10bn nuclear sell-off US firms tipped to bid for Sellafield
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Operations at Sellafield and other major nuclear plants such as Sizewell and Dungeness are to be sold off to the private sector for more than £10bn under plans drawn up yesterday by the board of British Nuclear Fuels Ltd (BNFL). American companies such as Halliburton and Fluor are seen as likely contenders in any race to take over British Nuclear Group, which is the main operating arm of the government-owned BNFL, handling nuclear generation, reprocessing and clean-up businesses.The transfer of key operations out of state hands at a time when Britain is facing an energy shortfall will generate surprise, particularly with North Sea oil and gas running down and the government edging towards a decision to proceed with a new generation of nuclear reactors.
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Industry sources said the company was determined to find a new future for BNG through a partnership with the private sector or, more likely, through an outright sale of the business which emplo
Rad Journal - libya nuclear program may have received outside aid
www.radjournal.com, 30 Dec 2003 [cached]
Received Outside Aid
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TRIPOLI, Libya - Libya received its nuclear technology from a "sophisticated" international network but not necessarily with the knowledge of any government, U.N. nuclear chief, Mohamed ElBaradei said, after touring four atomic sites and meeting with the country's leader, Moammar Gadhafi.
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ElBaradei also said Libya's technology was of a "familiar design," meaning its origins would not be hard to trace and that its nuclear program was not advanced.
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The United States, which believes Libya's weapons programs are more extensive, will send its own experts to help dismantle them, a senior Bush administration official said. The CIA and British intelligence believes there are 11 sites in Libya connected to weapons work, the official said.
Gadhafi assured ElBaradei that Libya would cooperate fully with the International Atomic Energy Agency and eliminate its long-secret nuclear program, saying he wanted to turn Libya into a "mainstream" nation, IAEA spokesman Mark Gwozdecky said.
Gwozdecky said Libya's program had been too low-level to be detected previously by the IAEA.
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Gadhafi's admission that Libya had been seeking nuclear weapons and his decision to renounce them, made after months of secret negotiations with the United States and Britain, came as surprise to the IAEA, the U.N. body charged with keeping watch on nuclear programs.
ElBaradei and an IAEA team toured four nuclear facilities in Tripoli , finding equipment dismantled and packed into crates.
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ElBaradei said that based on what the team saw, Libya reached only an experimental level in its attempts to enrich uranium, the essential material for a bomb.
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ElBaradei discussed future inspections of Libya's nuclear sites with Prime Minister Shokri Ghanem and Deputy Prime Minister Matouq Mohammed Matouq, who heads the country's nuclear program.
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Libyan Foreign Minister Abdul-Rahman Shalqam told AP that ElBaradei's visit was "an exploratory mission and not with the aim of inspecting sites.
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He also said Libya possessed only "research operations and not active programs."
ElBaradei said the origins of Libya's imported equipment could easily be identified as it was "of a familiar design."
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ElBaradei said that It would have been "a question of years, not a question of months" before Libya could have produced weapons-grade uranium.
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Libya has promised to cooperate with the U.N. nuclear agency and said it would sign a protocol allowing intrusive inspections at short notice.
Libya's nuclear facts
A study taken in 2002 indicates that Libya has taken steps to acquire weapons of mass destruction and systems to deliver them. In the late 1980's with the conflict with Chad, Libya became one of the few countries to have employed chemical weapons.
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Interest in pursuing a nuclear weapon is unclear.
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Libya is struggling to develop the Al Fatah missile.
Taipei Times - archives
www.taipeitimes.com, 2 Oct 2005 [cached]
Search Advanced Search Most Read Story Most Viewed Photo >>Login<< >>Free sign up!<<
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IAEA calls for nuclear-free Middle East
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The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on Friday unanimously called for a nuclear-weapons-free zone in the Middle East but rejected an Arab call to denounce Israel as a nuclear threat.
...
Egyptian ambassador Ramzy Ezzeldin Ramzy told the conference that the resolution on a weapons-free zone invites Israel, believed to be the only nuclear-armed state in the Middle East, "to join the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty [NPT] and to accept that its various facilities be subject to the IAEA safeguards system."
Israel has not signed the NPT and neither confirms nor denies reports that it has some 200 atom bombs.
Jordanian ambassador Shebab Madi said: "Unfortunately this resolution will not be sufficient to ensure ... the denuclearization of this region.
...
Libyan representative Matouq Mohamed Matouq said: "We should urge Israel to renounce these weapons," and Syrian I. Othman, head of the country's atomic energy commission, said "the first step is for Israel to join the NPT."
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Libyan representative Matouq Mohamed Matouq said: "We should urge Israel to renounce these weapons," and Syrian I. Othman, head of the country's atomic energy commission, said "the first step is for Israel to join the NPT."
...
Frank said that while Israel thought a weapons-free zone "could eventually serve as a complement to overall efforts to peace and security in the region" it first wanted a general peace agreement.
...
Frank said Israeli actions, such as its withdrawal from Gaza, had created a "window of opportunity to advancing peace and security in the region."
...
Confidence-building, as in creating a nuclear-weapons-free zone, "is a long and enduring process," Frank said and should be done in "a manner that does not hamper the security of any participant."
...
The IAEA conference rejected discussion of "Israeli nuclear capabilities and threat," as proposed in a resolution by Oman, despite a strong push for this by 15 Arab states plus the Palestinian Authority.
The agenda item was put off until next year as part of a compromise that has taken place annually since 1998 in which Arab states drop this agenda request in order to coax Israeli support for a nuclear weapons-free zone.
Emotions were higher this year, however, after the IAEA's 35-nation board of governors found Iran guilty of violating the NPT and threatened to take Tehran to the UN Security Council.
Arab states resent that the IAEA is cracking down on Iran for what the US charges is a covert nuclear weapons program, while US ally Israel avoids such scrutiny.
Meanwhile, Iran may respond by holding back on oil sales if its nuclear program is referred to the UN Security Council, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said in an interview published yesterday.
...
"But if Iran's case is sent to the Security Council, we will respond by many ways, for example by holding back on oil sales," he told the United Arab Emirates' daily, the Khaleej Times.
"We have been extremely cooperative, we have had more than 1,200 man days of inspections, monitoring cameras are everywhere in our facilities," he said.
The IAEA passed a resolution a week ago Saturday recommending Iran be reported in the future to the council for possible sanctions.
Analysts had predicted Iran could use oil as a lever against countries seeking to send Iran to the council. This story has been viewed 45 times.
Iran News - Arabs fail in Israel nuclear denunciation
www.iranmania.com, 1 Oct 2005 [cached]
LONDON, October 1 (IranMania) - The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) unanimously called for a nuclear-weapons-free zone in the Middle East but rejected an Arab call to denounce Israel as a nuclear threat, AFP reported.
...
A general conference of the 139-nation agency also unanimously welcomed North Korea's agreement to abandon nuclear weapons and called on Pyongyang to let IAEA inspectors back into the country.
Egyptian ambassador Ramzy Ezzeldin Ramzy told the conference that the resolution on a weapons-free zone invites Israel, believed to be the only nuclear-armed state in the Middle East, "to join the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and to accept that its various facilities be subject to the IAEA safeguards system."
Israel has not signed the NPT and neither confirms nor denies reports that it has some 200 atom bombs.
Jordanian ambassador Shebab Madi said: "Unfortunately this resolution will not be sufficient to ensure... the denuclearisation of this region.A policy of double standards will continue throughout the world."
Libyan representative Matouq Mohamed Matouq said: "We should urge Israel to renounce these weapons," and Syrian I. Othman, head of the country's atomic energy commission, said "the first step is for Israel to join the NPT."Libyan representative Matouq Mohamed Matouq said: "We should urge Israel to renounce these weapons," and Syrian I. Othman, head of the country's atomic energy commission, said "the first step is for Israel to join the NPT."
...
Frank said that while Israel thought a weapons-free zone "could eventually serve as a complement to overall efforts to peace and security in the region" it first wanted a general peace agreement.
...
Frank said Israeli actions, such as its withdrawal from Gaza, had created a "window of opportunity to advancing peace and security in the region."
...
Confidence-building, as in creating a nuclear-weapons-free zone, "is a long and enduring process," Frank said and should be done in "a manner that does not hamper the security of any participant."
...
The IAEA conference rejected discussion of "Israeli nuclear capabilities and threat," as proposed in a resolution by Oman, despite a strong push for this by 15 Arab states plus the Palestinian Authority.
The agenda item was put off until next year as part of a compromise that has taken place annually since 1998 in which Arab states drop this agenda request in order to coax Israeli support for a nuclear weapons-free zone.
Emotions were higher this year, however, after the IAEA's 35-nation board of governors found Iran guilty of violating the NPT and threatened to take Tehran to the UN Security Council.
Arab states resent that the IAEA is cracking down on Iran for what the United States charges is a covert nuclear weapons program, while US ally Israel avoids such scrutiny.
The agency welcomed the six-party North Korean nuclear agreement reached in Beijing September 19 as "a first step toward the goal of the verifiable denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula in a peaceful manner."
It was a compromise between the United States and China, both involved in the six-party talks.They clashed over promising to supply Pyongyang with a light-water nuclear reactor in order to generate power for peaceful purposes, diplomats said.
China wanted this mentioned, and since it was not, refrained from co-sponsoring the resolution, diplomats said.
For China, Zhang Huazhu warned that "future talks and negotiations will be more complex and difficult."
The United States, which has called North Korea a rogue state seeking weapons of mass destruction, says Pyongyang must first disarm, before getting a reactor as an incentive.
US ambassador Gregory Schulte said: "The United States believes that it is imperative to move rapidly on an agreement to implement the goals outlined in the joint statement."
...
"US officials wanted a neutral text in Vienna that would not interfere with the six-party talks in Asia," a diplomat said.
...
LONDON, October 1 (IranMania) - The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) unanimously called for a nuclear-weapons-free zone in the Middle East but rejected an Arab call to denounce Israel as a nuclear threat, AFP reported.
...
A general conference of the 139-nation agency also unanimously welcomed North Korea's agreement to abandon nuclear weapons and called on Pyongyang to let IAEA inspectors back into the country.
Egyptian ambassador Ramzy Ezzeldin Ramzy told the conference that the resolution on a weapons-free zone invites Israel, believed to be the only nuclear-armed state in the Middle East, "to join the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and to accept that its various facilities be subject to the IAEA safeguards system."
Israel has not signed the NPT and neither confirms nor denies reports that it has some 200 atom bombs.
Jordanian ambassador Shebab Madi said: "Unfortunately this resolution will not be sufficient to ensure... the denuclearisation of this region.A policy of double standards will continue throughout the world."
Libyan representative Matouq Mohamed Matouq said: "We should urge Israel to renounce these weapons," and Syrian I. Othman, head of the country's atomic energy commission, said "the first step is for Israel to join the NPT."Libyan representative Matouq Mohamed Matouq said: "We should urge Israel to renounce these weapons," and Syrian I. Othman, head of the country's atomic energy commission, said "the first step is for Israel to join the NPT."
...
Frank said that while Israel thought a weapons-free zone "could eventually serve as a complement to overall efforts to peace and security in the region" it first wanted a general peace agreement.
...
Frank said Israeli actions, such as its withdrawal from Gaza, had created a "window of opportunity to advancing peace and security in the region."
...
Confidence-building, as in creating a nuclear-weapons-free zone, "is a long and enduring process," Frank said and should be done in "a manner that does not hamper the security of any participant."
...
The IAEA conference rejected discussion of "Israeli nuclear capabilities and threat," as proposed in a resolution by Oman, despite a strong push for this by 15 Arab states plus the Palestinian Authority.
The agenda item was put off until next year as part of a compromise that has taken place annually since 1998 in which Arab states drop this agenda request in order to coax Israeli support for a nuclear weapons-free zone.
Emotions were higher this year, however, after the IAEA's 35-nation board of governors found Iran guilty of violating the NPT and threatened to take Tehran to the UN Security Council.
Arab states resent that the IAEA is cracking down on Iran for what the United States charges is a covert nuclear weapons program, while US ally Israel avoids such scrutiny.
The agency welcomed the six-party North Korean nuclear agreement reached in Beijing September 19 as "a first step toward the goal of the verifiable denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula in a peaceful manner."
It was a compromise between the United States and China, both involved in the six-party talks.They clashed over promising to supply Pyongyang with a light-water nuclear reactor in order to generate power for peaceful purposes, diplomats said.
China wanted this mentioned, and since it was not, refrained from co-sponsoring the resolution, diplomats said.
For China, Zhang Huazhu warned that "future talks and negotiations will be more complex and difficult."
The United States, which has called North Korea a rogue state seeking weapons of mass destruction, says Pyongyang must first disarm, before getting a reactor as an incentive.
US ambassador Gregory Schulte said: "The United States believes that it is imperative to move rapidly on an agreement to implement the goals outlined in the joint statement."
...
"US officials wanted a neutral text in Vienna that would not interfere with the six-party talks in Asia," a diplomat said.
...
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Arabs fail in Israel nuclear denunciation
www.spacewar.com, 30 Sept 2005 [cached]
The International Atomic Energy Agencyunanimously called Friday for a nuclear-weapons-free zone in the Middle East but rejected an Arab call to denounce Israel as a nuclear threat.
...
A general conference of the 139-nation agency also unanimously welcomed North Korea's agreement to abandon nuclear weapons and called on Pyongyang to let IAEA inspectors back into the country.
Egyptian ambassador Ramzy Ezzeldin Ramzy told the conference that the resolution on a weapons-free zone invites Israel, believed to be the only nuclear-armed state in the Middle East, "to join the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and to accept that its various facilities be subject to the IAEA safeguards system."
Israel has not signed the NPT and neither confirms nor denies reports that it has some 200 atom bombs.
Jordanian ambassador Shebab Madi said: "Unfortunately this resolution will not be sufficient to ensure... the denuclearisation of this region.A policy of double standards will continue throughout the world."
Libyan representative Matouq Mohamed Matouq said: "We should urge Israel to renounce these weapons," and Syrian I. Othman, head of the country's atomic energy commission, said "the first step is for Israel to join the NPT."Libyan representative Matouq Mohamed Matouq said: "We should urge Israel to renounce these weapons," and Syrian I. Othman, head of the country's atomic energy commission, said "the first step is for Israel to join the NPT."
...
Frank said that while Israel thought a weapons-free zone "could eventually serve as a complement to overall efforts to peace and security in the region" it first wanted a general peace agreement.
...
Frank said Israeli actions, such as its withdrawal from Gaza, had created a "window of opportunity to advancing peace and security in the region."
...
Confidence-building, as in creating a nuclear-weapons-free zone, "is a long and enduring process," Frank said and should be done in "a manner that does not hamper the security of any participant."
...
The IAEA conference rejected discussion of "Israeli nuclear capabilities and threat," as proposed in a resolution by Oman, despite a strong push for this by 15 Arab states plus the Palestinian Authority.
The agenda item was put off until next year as part of a compromise that has taken place annually since 1998 in which Arab states drop this agenda request in order to coax Israeli support for a nuclear weapons-free zone.
Emotions were higher this year, however, after the IAEA's 35-nation board of governors found Iran guilty of violating the NPT and threatened to take Tehran to the UN Security Council.
Arab states resent that the IAEA is cracking down on Iran for what the United States charges is a covert nuclear weapons program, while US ally Israel avoids such scrutiny.
The agency welcomed the six-party North Korean nuclear agreement reached in Beijing September 19 as "a first step toward the goal of the verifiable denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula in a peaceful manner."
It was a compromise between the United States and China, both involved in the six-party talks.They clashed over promising to supply Pyongyang with a light-water nuclear reactor in order to generate power for peaceful purposes, diplomats said.
China wanted this mentioned, and since it was not, refrained from co-sponsoring the resolution, diplomats said.
For China, Zhang Huazhu warned that "future talks and negotiations will be more complex and difficult."
The United States, which has called North Korea a rogue state seeking weapons of mass destruction, says Pyongyang must first disarm, before getting a reactor as an incentive.
US ambassador Gregory Schulte said: "The United States believes that it is imperative to move rapidly on an agreement to implement the goals outlined in the joint statement."
...
"US officials wanted a neutral text in Vienna that would not interfere with the six-party talks in Asia," a diplomat said.
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