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Wrong Masako Douglas?

Masako O. Douglas

Assistant Professor

California State University , Long Beach

HQ Phone:  (562) 985-4111

Email: m***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

California State University , Long Beach

1250 Bellflower Boulevard

Long Beach, California,90840

United States

Company Description

Welcome to the Official Off-campus Housing Services (OCH) at The California State University Long Beach. ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Curriculum Coordinator

Orange Coast Gakuen Inc


Coordinator of the JHL Special Interest Group

Association of Teachers of Japanese


Affiliations

JHL-SIG

Founder


Education

doctoral degree

education

University of Southern California


Web References(29 Total References)


www.aatj.org

Professor Masako Douglas (Post-secondary category)
Please join us congratulating this year's AATJ Teacher Award recipients, Ms. Noriko Coyle of North Penn High School in Pennsylvania and Professor Masako Douglas of California State University, Long Beach. Masako Douglas Professor Masako Douglas, California State University, Long Beach Professor Douglas, who is recognized as a "valuable resource" in Southern California, is an "excellent teacher, researcher, and contributor to the development of Japanese language education in the U.S." Receiving excellent reviews from her students, she constantly tries to offer what is best for her students. In 2007, her advanced course was selected as an example of World Languages Best Practices by the College Board. She has contributed to our profession through her research projects and presentations, AATJ's JOINT program, and workshops on various topics including CBI, differentiation, and teaching kanji. She has played a central role in the field of JHL, founding the JHL-SIG in AATJ, offering teacher training workshops, publishing a JHL textbook, and advising JHL Saturday schools in Southern California.


www.sabotenweb.com [cached]

Masako O. Douglas "Learning and teaching kanji: For students from an alphabetic background"
Masako O. Douglas Assistant Professor at California State University, Long Beach. Her research interests are acquisition of literacy in Japanese as a foreign/heritage langauge, and heritage language education (young learners and college students). She is a coordinator of Japanese Heritage Language SIG. She developed a course for college students of Japanese as a heritage language at California State University, Long Beach and University of California, Los Angeles. She has been developing a curriculum for young learners of Japanese as a heritage language at Kodomo no Ie Japanese langauge school. Kanji is the one of her primary areas of research as a part of literacy acquisition. She wrote a book of kanji, "A Practical Guide to Learning Kanji: For Learners from an Alphabetic Background" (McGraw-Hill).


www.sabotenweb.com [cached]

Masako O. Douglas "Issues in Teaching Japanese as a Heritage Language"
Masako O. Douglas Assistant Professor at California State University, Long Beach. Her research interests are acquisition of literacy in Japanese as a foreign/heritage langauge, and heritage language education (young learners and college students). She is a coordinator of Japanese Heritage Language SIG. She developed a course for college students of Japanese as a heritage language at California State University, Long Beach and University of California, Los Angeles. She has been developing a curriculum for young learners of Japanese as a heritage language at Kodomo no Ie Japanese langauge school. Kanji is the one of her primary areas of research as a part of literacy acquisition. She wrote a book of kanji, "A Practical Guide to Learning Kanji: For Learners from an Alphabetic Background" (McGraw-Hill).


www.sabotenweb.com [cached]

Masako O. Douglas
California State University, Long Beach © M.O.Douglas Learning kanji is one of the challenges for learners of Japanese as a second language, especially for those, who are from an alphabetic language. Ishida (1984) reports that 50 alphabet-based learners who have learned 600 kanji listed the following difficulties: writing kanji, sounds, meaning, how to memorize kanji, combination of kanji to make compound words, and stroke orders. In addition to these difficulties, which come from inherent nature of kanji, learners from an alphabetic background reported h recognition and writing of thousands of kanji can be frustrating to a student with no kanji backgroundh, gI feel discourage because after only three days, I donft remember the kanji I just learnedh ,hkanji is an extremely difficult alphabet to masterh, to mention a few (kanji survey conducted by Douglas, 1999). The following texts with different readability present an evidence of this (Douglas, 2001). (Cited from Douglas, M. 2001. A practical guide to learning kanji: For learners from an alphabetic background. McGraw-Hill) I added sound association to his work as follows so that association can be used to learn pronunciation of kanji as well as meaning (Douglas, 2001, p.31). Douglas (1992) found that it took 4.1 years of kanji study for them to use a memory strategy. Douglas, M. 2001. A practical guide to learning kanji: For learners from an alphabetic background. McGraw-Hill. Douglas, M. 1992. gDevelopment of Orthography-Related Reading/Writing Strategies by Learners of Japanese as a Foreign Language.h Doctoral dissertation. University of Southern California. Dissertation Abstract International, 53, 3709-C.


www.aatj.org [cached]

For further information on the Japanese Heritage SIG, please contact SIG Coordinator Masako Douglas at mdouglas@csulb.edu.


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