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Wrong Mary Duryea?

Mary L. Duryea

Professor and Associate Dean

University of Florida

HQ Phone:  (904) 588-1800

Direct Phone: (352) ***-****direct phone

Email: m***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Florida

2015 North Jefferson Street

Jacksonville, Florida,32206

United States

Company Description

The University of Florida prides itself on its research facilities and encourages all students to partake, even during their freshman and sophomore years. For the 2015-2016 school year, UF received a record $724 million in funding for research projects. The sc...more

Background Information

Employment History

Associate Dean for Research and Associate Director

JOE'S PROFESSIONAL TAX SERVICE INC


Affiliations

Lead21

Board Member


See Our Technical Committee

Board Member


Education

Ph.D.


Web References(38 Total References)


Wind Tolerance for Trees in the Palm Beach Landscape | Pamela Crawford

pamela-crawford.com [cached]

Dr. Mary Duryea ( Assistant Dean for Research and Assistant Director, IFAS, University of Florida) conducts surveys after all the hurricanes that have hit Florida; she has done that since the mid-80's, including Opal, Erin, and Andrew.
This data is valuable because she was able to actually count trees and use scientific methods to determine how they did. Currently, she is analyzing her data from the four storms of 2004, which I look forward to reading upon its completion. Dr. Duryea has summarized some interesting facts in her surveys. She found that native trees fared better than exotics in south Florida after Hurricane Andrew: "Native tree species...were the best survivors in the wind...34% of the exotic trees were still standing after the hurricane (Andrew) while 66% of native trees were standing."(13) She also has interesting information about how trees fared in the same storm: "In general, fruit trees were severely damaged. According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 46% were left standing (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 68% of the black olives were left standing. According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 52% were left standing (15). Cedar, Southern Red (Juniperus silicicola): Dr. Mary Duryea reported significant crown damage in Erin (85 mph winds), but only 8% fell. Forty percent fell after Opal (125 mph winds). Dr. Mary Duryea of University of Florida calls the crepe myrtle "quite good" for wind tolerance (16). Dr. Mary Duryea of the University of Florida says that the bald cypress is all in all a sturdy tree. But she went on to say the top sometimes breaks off of the large trees, and it may uproot along lakes and ponds (16). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), less than 50% of these trees were left standing (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), less than 42% of these trees were left standing (15). In Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew, this was one of the top three trees with 84% still standing after the storm. (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), less than 50% of these trees were left standing (15). An old Hong Kong orchid was reported uprooted in 84 mph winds at Vanderbilt Beach near Naples (17). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), she had reports of only 6 or 7 of this species, which may not be enough for a true scientific survey. Lime, Key (Citrus aurantifolia 'Key Lime'): According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 725% of these trees fell (15). A homeowner from Vanderbilt Beach (84 mph winds) reported that half of her key lime tree was broken (14). Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica): According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 91% of these trees fell but her sample size was small (15). Dr. Mary Duryea reports that less than 10% had significant crown damage) in Erin and Opal, which means that it does well in up to cat 3 storms (14). However, Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph winds) showed 75% of the mahoganies were still standing (15). Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph winds) showed 60% of the mangoes were still standing but they were one of the five species that caused the most property damage. (15). A homeowner from Vanderbilt Beach (84 mph winds) reported her Edward mango blew over but was righted and staked (17). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey following hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 79% of these trees were left standing (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea, it even ranked as the top shade tree after hurricane Camille, which is the strongest hurricane on record to ever hit the United States. She goes on to state that this tree also did well in Opal and Erin, showing little crown damage (14). Dr. Duryea also reported that this tree survived the 145 mph winds of Andrew well, with 78% left standing after the storm. According to Dr. Mary Duryea, it did well in Opal and Erin and generally handles hurricane force winds extremely well. She says their wind tolerance is increased if they are used in groups (16). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 66% of these trees were left standing (15). Orange trees have a medium wind tolerance. Palm, Alexander (Ptycosperma elegans): Zones 10 to 11. According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 41% of these trees were left standing (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), queen palms were one of the five species that did the most property damage (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), royal palms were one of the five species that did the most property damage. According to Dr. Mary Duryea, it was the second most wind-resistant tree in the strongest hurricane on record, Camille (14). And it survived winds of at least 145 mph after Andrew. As a matter of fact, in Dr. Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew, the sabal palm was the second best survivor, with 93% still standing after the storm (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea this is the "best palm around" (16). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 100% of these trees were left standing but she only had a sample size of 5. (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), this tree performed worse than any other, with only 4% left standing (15). This is one of the three most dangerous trees for wind damage in the Palm Beach county. If you have one within falling distance of your home, have it removed as soon as possible. Pine, Sand (Pinus clausa): Zones 8 to 10a. Sand pines are one of the worst trees for wind tolerance. According to Dr. Mary Duryea, "Sand pine should not be planted or allowed to grow to a large size near any dwelling. According to Dr. Mary Duryea's study of homeowners after hurricane Andrew, 73% were left standing after the storm. According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), she had reports of only 10 of this species, which may not be enough for a true scientific survey. According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey after Hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 43 % of the royal poincianas fell (15). Sausage Tree (Kigelia pinnata): According to Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), less than 50% of these trees were left standing (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 85% of the scheffleras were left standing (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 64% of the sea grapes were left standing. According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), she had reports on only 6 or 7 of this species, which may not be enough for a true scientific survey. However, 100% were still standing after the storm (15). he Palm Beach Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society had six 'good' reports on this plant's performance during Frances and Jeanne. In Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after Andrew, this tree was the top survivor, with 96% still standing after the storm (15). According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), they had reports of only 10 of this species, which may not be enough for a true scientific survey. According to Dr. Mary Duryea's survey of homeowners after hurricane Andrew (145 mph), 33% of these trees were left standing (14). 14. Duryea, Mary L."Wind and Trees: Surveys of Tree Damage in the Florida Panhandle after Hurricanes Erin and Opal". Circular 1183, one of a series of the School of Forest resources and Conservation, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, 1997. 15. Duryea, Mary L., Blakeslee, George M., Hubbard, William G., and Vasquez, Ricardo A. "Wind and Trees; A Survey of Homeowners after Hurricane Andrew". 16. Duryea, Mary L., Assistant Dean for Research and Assistant Director, IFAS, University of Florida. Email and phone correspondence.


Landscape Mulches: What Are The Choices in Florida? ….. : Foster Folly News, Chipley, Florida

fosterfollynews.com [cached]

Mary L. Duryea, Professor and Extension Specialist, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, PO Box 110410, Gainesville, FL, 32611-0410.
Email: mlduryea@ufl.edu


lead-21.org

Mary Duryea
University of Florida ESCOP Member


peanutcrsp.org

Mary Duryea
University of Florida 1022 McCarthy Hall, P.O. Box 110200 Gainesville, FL. 326110200 USA mlduryea@ufl.edu +1 - ( 352 ) - 392-1784


peanutcrsp.org

Mary Duryea
University of Florida 1022 McCarthy Hall, P.O. Box 110200 Gainesville, FL. 326110200 USA mlduryea@ufl.edu +1 - ( 352 ) - 392-1784


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