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This profile was last updated on 9/7/04  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Mary L. Dundas

Wrong Dr. Mary L. Dundas?
 
Background

Employment History

10 Total References
Web References
All foods have some nutritional value, ...
www.journalnet.com, 7 Sept 2004 [cached]
All foods have some nutritional value, but some foods you want to eat less of and not as often, said Dr. Mary Dundas, a registered dietitian and associate professor at Idaho State University.
She recommends nutrition dense foods make up the bulk of everyone's diet to promote a healthy lifestyle.Some of her favorite health foods are found in most people's refrigerators and pantries.
All fruits and vegetables also have phytochemicals in them, which are not vitamins or minerals, but have many healthful qualities.Research indicates they decrease the risk of getting cancer.
"Not only do they taste good and are low in calories, cruciferous vegetables , broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and cabbage , are wonderful for reducing risks for certain types of cancer," Dundas said.
Dundas can't say enough about broccoli because of these cancer-fighting qualities.Broccoli is also low in calories, an excellent source of fiber, Vitamin C, calcium and carotene.
Blueberries are a frequent addition to breakfast menus, and a healthy fruit to include in your diet, Dundas said.
...
Antioxidants, found in blueberries and other foods, help to prevent bad cholesterol, LDL, from becoming oxidized, which facilitates plaque formation on the inside wall of the arteries, Dundas said.
Cranberries are another tasty berry that have added health benefits and should be included in everyone's diet, Dundas said.
...
But beware the high sugar content in cranberry juices, Dundas warns.If you are watching your caloric intake, or have blood sugar problems, such as diabetes or hypoglycemia, Dundas suggests to only drink a small serving of cranberry juice.
Make sure to buy a cranberry beverage that lists cranberry juice higher on the ingredients list than any added sugar or high-fructose corn sweetener , which indicates there is more nutritious juice than empty calories from sugar, Dundas said.
"So many of these drinks now are packed with sugar," she said.
...
All foods have some nutritional value, but some foods you want to eat less of and not as often, said Dr. Mary Dundas, a registered dietitian and associate professor at Idaho State University.">
...
"It is never too late to start eating more nutritiously, it will always have benefits for you," Dundas said.
...
"So a piece of chocolate a day will help you," Dundas said.
But moderation is key, she said.
...
Whether you have a sweet tooth or a fat tooth, exercising moderation is the best way to maintain a happy, healthy lifestyle, Dundas said.
...
Trans-fatty acids are found in hydrogenated fats like margarine and many processed foods, such as store-bought crackers or cookies, microwaveable meals and fast food, said Dr. Mary Dundas, an Idaho State University professor of nutrition.
Currently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not require trans-fat to be listed on the nutritional label found on all packaged foods.But within a year or two Dundas said the FDA will start requiring food manufacturers to provide the amount of trans-fat per serving on the nutritional label.
In the meantime, Dundas said there is a simple calculation that determines the amount of trans-fat in a product.
Looking at the nutritional information labeled on the package, note how much total fat there is.Add the amount of saturated fat, mono-unsaturated fat and poly-unsaturated fat listed below the total fat count and subtract that number from how much total fat is listed.
The resulting number is how many grams of trans-fat per serving.Dundas said the less trans-fat you eat, the better.
Another rule of thumb, when choosing a margarine, the more liquid it is, the better it is for you.Spraying olive oil on your toast would be an extreme, though healthy example, Dundas added.
Elizabeth Ziegler covers health and education issues for the Journal.She can be reached at 239-3127 or by e-mail at ziegler@journalnet.com.
Faculty and Staff - Health and Nutrition Sciences | Idaho State University
www.naturalheritagecenter.org, 16 Mar 2006 [cached]
Dr. Mary Dundas, Program Director
Pocatello Idaho State Journal: Nutrition expert recommends 'edible medicines' for health
www.journalnet.com, 5 Sept 2004 [cached]
All foods have some nutritional value, but some foods you want to eat less of and not as often, said Dr. Mary Dundas, a registered dietitian and associate professor at Idaho State University.
She recommends nutrition dense foods make up the bulk of everyone's diet to promote a healthy lifestyle.Some of her favorite health foods are found in most people's refrigerators and pantries.
All fruits and vegetables also have phytochemicals in them, which are not vitamins or minerals, but have many healthful qualities.Research indicates they decrease the risk of getting cancer.
"Not only do they taste good and are low in calories, cruciferous vegetables - broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and cabbage - are wonderful for reducing risks for certain types of cancer," Dundas said.
Dundas can't say enough about broccoli because of these cancer-fighting qualities.Broccoli is also low in calories, an excellent source of fiber, Vitamin C, calcium and carotene.
Blueberries are a frequent addition to breakfast menus, and a healthy fruit to include in your diet, Dundas said.
...
Antioxidants, found in blueberries and other foods, help to prevent bad cholesterol, LDL, from becoming oxidized, which facilitates plaque formation on the inside wall of the arteries, Dundas said.
Cranberries are another tasty berry that have added health benefits and should be included in everyone's diet, Dundas said.
...
But beware the high sugar content in cranberry juices, Dundas warns.If you are watching your caloric intake, or have blood sugar problems, such as diabetes or hypoglycemia, Dundas suggests to only drink a small serving of cranberry juice.
Make sure to buy a cranberry beverage that lists cranberry juice higher on the ingredients list than any added sugar or high-fructose corn sweetener - which indicates there is more nutritious juice than empty calories from sugar, Dundas said.
"So many of these drinks now are packed with sugar," she said.
...
All foods have some nutritional value, but some foods you want to eat less of and not as often, said Dr. Mary Dundas, a registered dietitian and associate professor at Idaho State University.">
...
"It is never too late to start eating more nutritiously, it will always have benefits for you," Dundas said.
...
"So a piece of chocolate a day will help you," Dundas said.
But moderation is key, she said.
...
Whether you have a sweet tooth or a fat tooth, exercising moderation is the best way to maintain a happy, healthy lifestyle, Dundas said.
...
Trans-fatty acids are found in hydrogenated fats like margarine and many processed foods, such as store-bought crackers or cookies, microwaveable meals and fast food, said Dr. Mary Dundas, an Idaho State University professor of nutrition.
Currently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not require trans-fat to be listed on the nutritional label found on all packaged foods.But within a year or two Dundas said the FDA will start requiring food manufacturers to provide the amount of trans-fat per serving on the nutritional label.
In the meantime, Dundas said there is a simple calculation that determines the amount of trans-fat in a product.
Looking at the nutritional information labeled on the package, note how much total fat there is.Add the amount of saturated fat, mono-unsaturated fat and poly-unsaturated fat listed below the total fat count and subtract that number from how much total fat is listed.
The resulting number is how many grams of trans-fat per serving.Dundas said the less trans-fat you eat, the better.
Another rule of thumb, when choosing a margarine, the more liquid it is, the better it is for you.Spraying olive oil on your toast would be an extreme, though healthy example, Dundas added.
Elizabeth Ziegler covers health and education issues for the Journal.She can be reached at 239-3127 or by e-mail at ziegler@journalnet.com.
Fast Food and Supersizing grab hold of ISU... - ISU Bengal - Life
www.isuextra.com, 6 Oct 2004 [cached]
Some of the committee members, such as Mary Dundas, professor of dietetics at ISU and Reading Project committee member, have a somewhat positive image of the industry.
"My hope would be that [students] know there are areas of concern, but know that our food supply is one of the safest in the world," says Dundas, adding, "I do think we have quite good standards on sanitation and inspection."Still, Dundas admits that nutritionally fast food franchises have had a rather bad track record.
"Fries used to have highly saturated fat that the product was cooked in," she says.Dundas went on to clarify that many restaurants today have bowed to public pressure and started providing healthier methods of cooking.
...
"I know personally I have spent hours and hours trying to prepare panelists to discuss a variety of issues," Dundas says.
Director: Mary Dundas, PhD, ...
www.allaccessinternships.com, 16 May 2009 [cached]
Director: Mary Dundas, PhD, RD, LD, FADA Telephone: (208) 282-2352 FaxNumber: (208) 282-4903 Email: dundmary@isu.edu
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