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2015-03-05T00:00:00.000Z

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Deceased

Background Information

Employment History

Publisher and Editor In Chief

Cricket Magazine Group

Vice President

Carus Corporation

Affiliations

Chief Executive Officer
Carus Publishing Company

Board of Trustees Member
University of Illinois

Executive Board of the International Board On Books
Young People

Board Member
American Library Service for Children

Board Member
International Youth Library

Education


art history and German literature
University of Chicago


philosophy and English , American and German literature
University of Freiburg

engineering degree

University of Michigan

Web References (53 Total References)


Mary Hegeler Carus (1861-1936): ...

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Mary Hegeler Carus (1861-1936): Pursuing an unusual path for a woman of her time, Carus received an outstanding education and was the first woman in history to graduate from the University of Michigan's Engineering College in 1882. After several battles for control over the Matthiessen and Hegeler Zinc Company due to gender bias, Carus was finally able to run her father's business.

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Mary Hegeler Carus


Mary Hegeler Carus ...

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Mary Hegeler Carus (1861-1936)

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Mary Hegeler Carus
Born on the grounds of her father's zinc factory, Mary Hegeler Carus took the unusual step for a woman of her time period in pursuing a college career and going on to advanced study in engineering. She then took on the responsibility of running her family's business, the Matthiessen and Hegeler Zinc Company, resisting the efforts of her siblings to sell the company to outsiders.
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Born on the grounds of her father's zinc factory, Mary Hegeler Carus (born: January 10, 1861 in La Salle, IL; died: June 27, 1936 in La Salle, IL) took the unusual step for a woman of her time period in pursuing a college career and going on to advanced study in engineering. She then took on the responsibility of running her family's business, the Matthiessen and Hegeler Zinc Company, resisting the efforts of her siblings to sell the company to outsiders. Nor was she a figurehead: while she had a long and happy marriage, she did not follow the pattern typical for her period of female inheritors turning over company management to their husbands but instead was actively involved in all aspects of company policy. By the time Carus died in 1936, zinc had become an integral component of many of the 20th century's most important consumer products from radios to automobiles.
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Thus it was fitting that Mary Hegeler Carus was carried to her grave by the supervisors she had worked with at Matthiessen & Hegeler.
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While the town lay still in the eerie quiet of the closed works, these work-toughened men gently took Mary to rest in a casket made of the finest zinc they could produce. In many ways her life was as refined and pure as the metal which dominated her world from the cradle to the grave.
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This lack of recognition would persist throughout her life; for example, "from the 1920s on Paul, Herman, or Edward Carus could always be found in the Chicago Who's Who... [but]Mary Carus never appears.
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[44] Mary Hegeler Carus to Edward Carus, July 7, 1909, Hegeler-Carus Family Papers, MSS 32 (Special Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Ill.).
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[45] Mary Hegeler Carus to Edward Carus, Oct. 4, 1909, Hegeler-Carus Family Papers.
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[46] Mary Hegeler Carus to Edward Carus, Nov. 3, 1909 and April 4, 1911, Hegeler-Carus Family Papers.
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[47] Mary Hegeler Carus to Edward Carus, Jan. 7, 1912, Hegeler-Carus Family Papers.
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"Mary Hegeler Carus. (2015) In Immigrant Entrepreneurship, Retrieved March 5, 2015, from Immigrant Entrepreneurship: http://www.immigrantentrepreneurship.org/entry.php?rec=109
Chicago Style
Lohne, Raymond. "Mary Hegeler Carus. In Immigrant Entrepreneurship: German-American Business Biographies, 1720 to the Present, vol.
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Mary Hegeler Carus, c. 1930
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Marianne Carus


Community Grants Program | Illinois Humanities Council

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Petticoats and Slide Rulers: The Life of Mary Carus Board of Trustees Southern Illinois University


Marianne Carus ...

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Marianne Carus (1928-)

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Marianne Carus
Marianne Carus is the founder of Cricket magazine for children and young adults. Building on her success with Cricket, Carus managed to create a new niche market for children's literary magazines in the United States, eventually launching four more magazines aimed at different age groups.
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[1] This conviction led Marianne Carus (born June 16, 1928 in Dieringhausen, Germany) to found, in 1973, Cricket magazine for children and young adults-a publication that would be called the New Yorker of children's literature, receive dozens of awards and continue to have a loyal following to this day. In founding Cricket, Carus filled a gap in children's publishing that existed at the time in the United States-a literary magazine for kids. Encouraged by the magazine's enthusiastic reception, Marianne would later add another four magazines, each aimed at a different age group: Ladybug, Spider, Babybug, and Cicada. She would launch Ask, Muse, and Click in collaboration with the Smithsonian. Marianne was also publisher and editor in chief of Cricket Books, publishing mostly fiction for children from six to twelve years of age. To ensure the quality of her publications, she sought out the works of distinguished contemporary (and past) authors and illustrators. They were established writers but also new, talented young authors and artists for whom Marianne created a market, introducing them into the field.
Family and Ethnic Background
Marianne Carus, née Sondermann, was born in Dieringhausen, North Rhine-Westphalia, on June 16, 1928, just before the Great Depression. She grew up in nearby Gummersbach. The Sondermanns of the nineteenth century had mostly been textile industrialists and doctors.
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Richard Sondermann, her grandfather, had also been an eye doctor and surgeon and wanted Marianne to go into the sciences.
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A sister, Inge (born June 21, 1924) , is four years older than Marianne. The girls should have enjoyed the secure lifestyle of children born into a professional, middle-class family. Their childhood, however, was darkened by World War II, which started when Marianne was eleven years old. When she was fifteen, in 1944, her high school class was sent to the western front, where the girls had to prepare food for the boys whose work it was to help the soldiers dig trenches. Marianne remembers mainly having to peel potatoes. While retreating from one battle site to another, the young people were often strafed by U.S. and allied planes. Marianne survived this ordeal for five months. Because students could not attend class during this period of service, they were admitted on their return to an accelerated program at the Gummersbach Gymnasium (secondary school).
At the end of this program, Marianne took and passed the Abitur, the final exam that qualified her to go to university. She studied philosophy and English, American, and German literature at the University of Freiburg and then later French literature at the Sorbonne in Paris. After her arrival in the United States, she studied art history and German literature at the University of Chicago. About her time at the University of Freiburg, Carus says:
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In 1949 Marianne met a German-American named Milton Blouke Carus (born June 15, 1927) at the University of Freiburg where they were fellow students.
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Marianne notes fondly sixty-four years later. [4]) In 1950, Blouke was summoned back to the United States to work in the family business Carus Chemical. Although Marianne had promised her father to earn her doctoral degree before marrying, the couple tied the knot in March 1951 and moved to LaSalle, a small town in Illinois of about 12,000 inhabitants at the time. [5]
While Marianne's first impression of the United States was less favorable ("I was sort of amazed at New York . . . I thought people were emptying their wastebaskets out of their windows. Because papers were all over the streets. And there was no one place where they could be collected, they were just floating around" [6]),she immediately felt welcome when she moved to Illinois. The Caruses renovated a small stone house, and Marianne gave birth to their first child, André, on June 24, 1953. The birth of two daughters followed-Christine on October 5, 1958, and Inga on January 21, 1959.
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In early 1887, Edward Hegeler invited Paul Carus to come work with him as an editor at Open Court Publishing Company. [8] Paul fell in love with Hegeler's daughter Mary and married her in 1888.
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By the time Blouke and Marianne Carus got married, most of the family members had left the mansion and the home was deteriorating.
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[11] Upon returning to the United States, Marianne and Blouke-the latter of whom had himself attended the Berthold-Gymnasium in Freiburg, Germany for one year in 1939-were shocked when they saw the reading texts offered at his LaSalle school. Marianne remembers:
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Marianne remembers the early days:
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This valuable network Marianne would eventually draw on years later when founding Cricket and her other magazines for children and adolescents.
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While researching old readers, Marianne got the idea of starting a children's magazine-a magazine that published literature and art produced by the best contemporary writers, poets, and artists to introduce children to good literature outside the realm of school books. At the time approximately eighty-five children's magazines were already on the market, Marianne remembers. "People told us we were lunatics. We were quite naïve. [16] When she explored the market, however, she discovered that there was not one literary children's magazine among all those being published. The one exception, Children's Digest, did not publish original stories but excerpts of already published literature. Marianne, however, wanted to present her readers with original material.
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Cricket, with a circulation of 136,000, is in fifteenth place. [55] Given that Marianne Carus never intended Cricketto be a mass publication, but rather cater to the interests of a small but discerning group of readers, that is a respectable position. By 1997, this number dropped to 80,000-no doubt due to the magazine group's diversification. [56] In a 1999 article, Blouke Carus estimates the total circulation of Cricket Magazine Group's publications at about 500,000. [57] Because the magazines were read by more than one family member and thousands of subscriptions went to schools and public libraries, the Caruses surmised that readership was close to two million. [58]
The overwhelming majority of Cricket's readers came from educated families with at least one parent holding a postgraduate degree, according to Marianne. [59] While most readers lived in the United States, only two years after its launch the magazine could already boast a proud number of international fans, too.[60] In the beginning, librarians and educators were the main focus group that was targeted with direct mailings of the magazine. Although direct mailings were very costly, this proved to be a highly successful marketing method. Marianne Carus remembers winning many subscribers "overnight.
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Today, Marianne continues to be involved in Cricket Magazine Group as an active adviser, although her priority is her family. She, her children, and her husband share a deep love of classical music. The family members used to love to play chamber music together-Marianne on the violin, Blouke on the cello, and daughter Christine on the flute. The Carus children follow in their parents' footsteps: André, who spurred Marianne's and Blouke's interest in educational reform, is CEO and publisher of Carus Publishing Company; Inga is chairwoman and CEO of Carus Corporation, the former Carus Chemical Company [67]; and Christine is a freelance designer.
More than sixty years after emigrating from Germany, asked whether she feels a particular allegiance to the United States or to her native country, Marianne laughs.
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From 1982 to 1985, Marianne acted as director on the board of the American Library Service for Children (ALSC). She served on the executive board of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) from 1990 to 1994, for two of those years as vice president. Her influence extended to Europe-in particular, her native Germany, where she was a member of the board of directors of the International Youth Library in Munich. Illinois Wesleyan University awarded her an honorary doctorate in 2003 and the Association of American Publishers inducted her into their hall of fame in 2006.
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It is almost impossible to measure the impact Marianne Carus has had on Ame


Marianne Carus ...

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Marianne Carus (1928-)

Marianne Carus is the founder of Cricket magazine. Building on her success with Cricket, Carus created a new niche market for children's literary magazines in the U.S., eventually launching four more magazines aimed at different age groups. Read More >

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