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Wrong Martin McDonnell?

Martin McDonnell

Diocese of Paterson

HQ Phone:  (973) 777-8818

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Diocese of Paterson

777 Valley Road

Clifton, New Jersey,07013

United States

Company Description

The Diocese of Paterson's Catholic Schools Office offers your child a quality education founded on gospel values. We provide support and services to the schools, students, parents, educators and administrators in our diocese. ...more

Background Information

Affiliations

Franciscan Order of the Holy Name Province

Member


Education

doctoral degree


masters degree


Web References(17 Total References)


Priest Directory - Diocese of Paterson - Clifton, NJ

patersondiocese.org [cached]

Martin McDonnell


As Parsippany parish turns 25, youngsters show appreciation through art

www.patersondiocese.org [cached]

Martin McDonnell, founding pastor of St. Ann's said.
McDonnell, who is always there for them, the religious education teachers, who dedicate their time teaching the faith and the warmth of the community, who embrace its children with open arms.


www.patersondiocese.org

Martin McDonnell, who recently retired as pastor of Good Shepherd, elevating the host with Deacon Tom Sullivan elevating the chalice and Father Ed Reading concelebrating Mass during the Sacred Triduum this past spring.
McDonnell, who retired as pastor on June 29, hired Berg to serve the parish, including maintaining the parish website, hosted by eCatholic and social media accounts on Facebook and Twitter.


At 'pizza' night, bishop tells men discerning priesthood to trust in God's grace

www.patersondiocese.org [cached]

Martin McDonnell, St. Anthony's pastor.


Kevin Barry, "Just a Lad of 18 Summers" -- The Wild Geese Today

www.thewildgeese.com [cached]

It was translated from the original Old Spanish and Portugese by Martin McDonnell, of Gaithersburg, Maryland, and sent to us by fellow Marylander Bruce Curley.
Here is Bruce Curley's introduction, followed by the first installment of the O'Brien Chronicle itself, just as McDonnell translated it. I first met Martin McDonnell in 1989 in Maryland at a silent retreat at St. Mary's. While everyone else walked around piously reciting rosaries or in silent prayer during breaks, Martin continued talking, loudly. His speech, squeaky and stilted, intrigued me. So I got talking to him late one night. I found out he had recently suffered a massive heart attack and lost a percentage use of motor functions, including speech, which accounted for the unusual sound of his voice. As the boats passed across the five-mile wide Chesapeake Bay and we stood on a bluff, he unraveled a tale he called the O'Brien Chronicle, written by an Irishman to support his Martin had translated this nearly 400-year-old story, and 10 years ago was struggling to tell me that he had seen O'Brien's story, written in O'Brien's own hand, in his own words. I told Martin I would visit and look at his manuscript. Martin, then Friar Martin McDonnell and living in Bahia, Brazil, had noticed little blond-haired, blue-eyed children. Knowing how far and wide the Irish had been scattered, he went looking for evidence of Irishmen in early Brazil. Martin had been researching in the national library for a number of years when he met a nun from New York who told him about an extraordinary narrative in the library's archives. Martin then pulled and translated the document -- The O'Brien Chronicle -- which is written in a number of languages and dialects. Martin's years of work to make this story accessible continues the ancient tradition of Irishmen preserving the stories that are our history. Many of the Irish have struggled to pass on their history, despite the best efforts of the Vikings and, later, the British to obstruct them. Without the many inventive ways that this story has been preserved by bright, courageous Irishmen and women -- from the ancient bards who memorized lines, to the hedge priests -- much of that history would be lost. Like those bygone heroes, Martin has struggled to give voice to a part of our past. I believe he has received God's blessing in this quest, ensuring that this piece of Irish history survives. We are immensely richer for it. A special note of thanks must go to Martin's wife, Anne McDonnell, for refusing to allow the doctors to end life support after Martin suffered his stroke, going against the advice of her doctors. Read a short biography of Martin McDonnell.


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