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Wrong Marc Collins-Rector?

Marc Collins-Rector

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Computer Student

UCLA


Affiliations

The Digital Entertainment Network Company

Co-Founders


DEN

Founder


Concentric Network Corporation

Founder


Education

UCLA


Web References(51 Total References)


JosephMenn.com

www.josephmenn.com [cached]

The founder, Marc Collins-Rector, was forced to leave the company after a lawsuit accused him of molesting a teenage boy, a charge he denies.
A planned stock offering that could have netted him and his executives hundreds of millions of dollars was abandoned. Investors also knew little about Collins-Rector, the entertainment novice they entrusted with their money. Collins-Rector declined to be interviewed. Collins-Rector saw the potential of this booming technology earlier than most. He lined up major investors, grabbed key advertisers, and his company was the first entertainment site to file for an initial public stock offering, positioning executives for the kinds of Internet riches that Hollywood moguls have come to envy. Collins-Rector was the main creative force. A 40-year-old technology guru with no entertainment experience, his background was murky even to the top executives he hired. But he did have tens of millions of dollars and a certain amount of tech industry cachet from an earlier company he had founded called Concentric Research. His two DEN co-founders were Chad Shackley, then 24, who had lived with Collins-Rector since dropping out of a Michigan high school, and Brock Pierce, then a 17-year-old actor best known for his leading roles in such Disney films as "The Mighty Ducks" and "First Kid." In his manifesto, crafted to energize early employees, Collins-Rector set his sights on segments of so-called Generation Y that he said were being ignored by mainstream television and movies. He identified punk rockers, extreme skaters and "hip-hoppers," and put gay teenagers at the top of the list. The company would build a huge market by "globalcasting to a narrowcast audience," he vowed. Collins-Rector often claimed to be in his late 20s, and associates and employees said he gave the impression he had been a computer student at UCLA. But company filings show that he is 40, and officials at UCLA say there is no record that he was ever a student there. In 1984, Collins-Rector and an Orange County businessman named Stephen Fryer founded an Irvine-based company called World TravelNet that electronically coordinated tours and cruises. In 1991, Collins-Rector rebounded by launching Concentric Research in Bay City, Mich. After meeting online, according to associates, their relationship flourished and Collins-Rector decided to base Concentric in Bay City and bring Shackley, then 16, into the company. The boy, now 20, says that Collins-Rector, using the screen name "Cyberpoet," offered him part-time work handling customer complaints at Concentric and flew him to Michigan and California for meetings. By 1995, Concentric was still relatively small, with 25 employees and $1 million in revenue. But its rapid growth attracted attention from Silicon Valley. That year, Collins-Rector and Shackley sold control to a group that included the top-drawer venture capital firm of Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. The windfall enabled Collins-Rector and Shackley to pursue a lavish new lifestyle. They called it the "M & C Estate," for Marc and Chad. "Microsoft spent $800 million trying to [solve the problem]," Collins-Rector wrote in his vision statement. According to several former DEN executives, the inspiration was simple indeed: It was to move the camera as little as possible, so computers would have fewer image changes to process. (Palmieri, the attorney for Collins-Rector, said Pierce's "contributions to the company were enormous. One former supervisor said Collins-Rector directed him to hire certain teenagers who weren't qualified for the jobs they sought. Company executives, including Gersh, Carpenter and Neuman, as well as board members, said they were unaware of any improper behavior by Collins-Rector and regarded his personal life as beyond their scope of concern. But two days earlier, Collins-Rector was served with a lawsuit filed by the New Jersey boy he had hired as a 13-year-old customer service employee at Concentric in the early 1990s. The suit, filed last May in U.S. District Court in Trenton, N.J., accused Collins-Rector of using his position of influence to sexually abuse the boy repeatedly from 1993 to 1996. In one instance, the suit alleged, the boy was flown to Bay City for a work assignment and invited to stay in Collins-Rector's home. That evening, according to the suit, Collins-Rector entered the boy's room and "moved his hand down [the boy's] chest, repeating the question, 'Do you trust me?' " The suit alleged that sexual encounters continued after Collins-Rector had sold his controlling stake in Concentric, moved to California, and founded Digital Entertainment Network. The age of consent in California is 18. At first, Collins-Rector denied the allegations and indicated he would fight the suit. That strategy collapsed after the emergence of a tape recording of a phone conversation between Collins-Rector and the boy, according to a source familiar with the case. Palmieri denies the existence of any such tape. He said that in his first meeting with the boy's attorney, he demanded, " 'If there is a smoking gun, let me see it.' There was no such thing." Collins-Rector agreed in mid-October to settle the suit, paying the plaintiff, now 20, an undisclosed sum but admitting no guilt. Palmieri characterized the suit as "classic IPO blackmail," and said Collins-Rector agreed to settle only to minimize publicity and damage to DEN. After the settlement, Collins-Rector, Shackley and Pierce left the company. One of the few artifacts from the previous era is a defaced photo of Collins-Rector hanging in a computer room. Someone has scrawled a mustache across his face in black ink, and the words, "Our former fearless leader." Collins-Rector's stake in DEN has dwindled to less than 20%, according to his attorney, and executives say he has no influence over management. Collins-Rector, Shackley and Pierce recently returned to their Southern California mansion and incorporated a new company, World Wide Technology & Internet Ventures Ltd., in the British Virgin Islands. Palmieri, the attorney, said Collins-Rector had nothing to do with bringing Burton into the company. "It does sound like a pattern, but it's not Mr. Collins-Rector who has done this," Palmieri said.


NAASCA - June '15 - week 4 - Recent News | NAASCA.org - National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse

www.naasca.org [cached]

There is a moment in the new documentary An Open Secret that puts into sharp relief how one of the most notorious convicted pedophiles of the last 15 years, Marc Collins-Rector, was able to ingratiate himself within Hollywood's elite, and those close to them.
In a grainy, desaturated shot pulled from what looks like an old VHS tape, we see a young actor walk up to the entrance of Collins-Rector's lavish Los Angeles mansion. It is likely 1999. Collins-Rector greets the actor with a hug, and a not-that-subtle pat on the butt. Hi, honey, says Collins-Rector. Your buddy's here. Who's that? says the actor. Mr. Huffington, says Collins-Rector a presumed reference to Michael Huffington, one of the wealthy and well-connected investors in Collins-Rector's doomed internet venture Digital Entertainment Network (or DEN). Mr. Huffington, says Collins-Rector a presumed reference to Michael Huffington, one of the wealthy and well-connected investors in Collins-Rector's doomed internet venture Digital Entertainment Network (or DEN). His story matched with all the other kids that we spoke to [who had been] at [Collins-Rector's] house. Berg clearly still believes Egan's account of his experiences with Collins-Rector and DEN in An Open Secret, and has used a great deal of it in the final version of her documentary. According to Anne Henry co-founder of BizParentz, a nonprofit resource for parents of child actors that consulted extensively with Berg for An Open Secret those issues also shouldn't nullify Egan's experiences with Collins-Rector.


NAASCA - Aug'16 - week 1 - Recent News | NAASCA.org - National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse

www.naasca.org [cached]

Nick S., whose screen credits included The Apostle and What's Eating Gilbert Grape , recalls being molested by Marc Collins-Rector, the founder of Digital Entertainment Network (DEN).
Nick recalls that Collins-Rector would say, Don't be scared, it's completely normal, as he abused him in a home movie theater.


NAASCA - May '15 - week 1 - Recent News | NAASCA.org - National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse

www.naasca.org [cached]

In a statement, executive producer Gabe Hoffman defended Egan's inclusion in the film, saying the scope of his involvement extends only to accusations made against Marc Collins-Rector, the Digital Entertainment Network (DEN) founder who pleaded guilty in 2004 to luring five minors across state lines for sex.


www.screendaily.com

Its founder, Mark Collins-Rector, a web entrepreneur who was later jailed for pedophilia (and since fled the US), entertained investors at poolside parties that, say the boys, made Roman Polanski's adventures seem tame.
"I'm not sure of all the things that were done to me. However, I know that Collins-Rector drugged me and abused me," Ryan testified.


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