logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 4/19/2016 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Marjorie Davidson?

Marjorie L. Davidson

Nat L Food Safety Education Off

Food and Drug Administration

HQ Phone:  (301) 827-6500

Direct Phone: (240) ***-****direct phone

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Food and Drug Administration

5600 Fishers Lane

Rockville, Maryland,20852

United States

Company Description

China's Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) is now offering a reward of about 50,000 US dollars for relevant information on counterfeit drug production. The bounty aims to "encourage the public to report illegal activities so as to determine, control and elimi...more

Background Information

Employment History

Director of Food-Safety Education

U.S. Department of Agriculture


Web References(43 Total References)


The Health Basket of Mt. Dora Digestion

www.healthbasket.net [cached]

Bacteria in food can grow at a faster rate at temperatures between 40 degrees Fahrenheit (F) and 140 degrees F, according to Marjorie Davidson, education team leader at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.
"Fortunately, there are a lot of steps consumers can take to keep family and friends from becoming ill," noted Davidson in an FDA news release.


November 2009 | Food Poison Journal

www.foodpoisonjournal.com [cached]

"The good news is that practicing four basic food safety measures can help prevent foodborne illness," says Marjorie Davidson, a consumer educator at FDA.
"For children, this means the time it takes to sing 'Happy Birthday' twice," says Davidson. * Wash food-contact surfaces (cutting boards, dishes, utensils, countertops) with hot, soapy water after preparing each food item and before going on to the next item. * Rinse fruits and vegetables thoroughly under cool running water and use a produce brush to remove surface dirt. * Do not rinse raw meat and poultry before cooking. "Washing these foods makes it more likely for bacteria to spread to areas around the sink and countertops," says Davidson. * "Color is not a reliable indicator of doneness," says Davidson. Davidson says, "A good rule to follow is, when in doubt, throw it out." * Leftovers should be used within three to four days.


Nursing Services

www.teacherweb.com [cached]

"The good news is that practicing four basic food safety measures can help prevent foodborne illness," says Marjorie Davidson, a consumer educator at FDA.
1. Clean: The first rule of safe food preparation in the home is to keep everything clean. • Wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling any food. "For children, this means the time it takes to sing 'Happy Birthday' twice," says Davidson. "Washing these foods makes it more likely for bacteria to spread to areas around the sink and countertops," says Davidson. • "Color is not a reliable indicator of doneness," says Davidson. Davidson says, "A good rule to follow is, when in doubt, throw it out."


Diet News

www.diet-rite.com [cached]

Moderator: Marjorie Davidson, Ph.D., of FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition


www.orovalleyhospital.com

Bacteria in food can grow at a faster rate at temperatures between 40 degrees Fahrenheit (F) and 140 degrees F, according to Marjorie Davidson, education team leader at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory