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Wrong Marianna Birnbaum?

Marianna D. Birnbaum

Visiting Professor In the Medieval Department

Central European University

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Central European University

Company Description

Central European University was founded in 1991 with the explicit aim of helping the process of transition from dictatorship to democracy in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, and Central Asia. It was committed to bringing together students from thes... more

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Web References(17 Total References)


Vital History in Palisadian's '1944' - Palisades News

www.palisadesnews.com [cached]

Marianna D. Birnbaum
Marianna D. Birnbaum After Daisy's parents had been taken away to different labor camps, she stayed alone in the cellar of a pillow factory, surrounded by rats. When her uncle's family did not join her there as promised, she got scared and ventured out on her own. She came across a large group of the Arrow Cross Party conducting a roundup. She saw an officer by himself, but bravely walked up to him and asked if she could walk with him as she was scared of the air raids. He casually walked her past the large group, avoiding her being captured. Another time she was wandering alone, stealing sauerkraut or pickles from large barrels outside grocery stores. She headed to her home in hopes her parents might have been released or had escaped and would be waiting for her. She found herself in a park and was thrown in with a group that was walking with the Arrow Cross holding guns on them. As they approached a small underpass, she just quietly turned away from the group and escaped. After the liberation, she heard that this group was part of some several thousand Jews who had been marched down to the banks of the Danube and shot dead, into the icy water. Daisy lost 67 members of her family during World War II. The book ends with recollections of some of her friends, all touched by this horrific period of history. Birnbaum came to the United States in 1956 during the Hungarian Revolution, but still visits her home country. She is a professor emeritus at UCLA, where she taught Hungarian and Central European literature and culture. She is also a recurring visiting professor in the Medieval Department at the Central European University in Budapest. As a survivor, Daisy is among those who must tell their stories. She has succeeded beautifully in this endeavor. During one trip to Israel, members of an Hungarian tour group were getting to know each other. One of the women mentioned where she had lived in Budapest during the war and mentioned having had a cousin who also lived there. They discovered the cousin was Birnbaum. Birnbaum moved to Pacific Palisades in 1965 with her late husband, Professor Henrik Birnbaum.


Central European University Press

www.ceupress.com [cached]

Marianna D. Birnbaum,Professor emeritus of University of California, Los Angeles; visiting professor of Central European University


1944 - A Year Without Goodbyes

www.ceupress.com [cached]

Marianna D. Birnbaum is Professor emeritus of the University of California, Los Angeles where she taught Hungarian and Central European literature and culture.
She is a recurring visiting professor in the Medieval Department of the Central European University.


Villa Aurora - LA: Lesungen

www.villa-aurora.org [cached]

December 6, 2004: Reading and Discussion with Prof. Marianna Birnbaum
"The Long Journey of Gracia Mendes" is the biography of a female mercantile in the 16th century. Although she was a practicing Christian, she secretly stayed Jewish. The novel tells her exceptional story until her death in Constantinople in 1569. Her life samples the Jewish culture's will to survive even under the worst circumstances. Marianna Birnbaum is Prof. Emeritus at UCLA, were she taught literature and culture. She is an Assistant Professor at the Medieval Department at the Central European University in Budapest.


Home

www.cryptojews.com [cached]

By Marianna Birnbaum It is easy to come under the spell of Gracia Nasi or Gracia Mendes, as Marianna Birnbaum prefers to call her.La Señora, as the great woman was known affectionately by her coreligionists, had headed the House of Mendes, prosperous trading and banking firm, which competed with the Fuggers, and had been referred to disdainfully by one of their agents as a Portuguese Jewish woman, living in Constantinople, who, writes Dr. Birnbaum "dared to dress and behave like a European aristocrat." Dr. Birnbaum brings the reader insight into the skill and effectiveness of Gracia Nasi as businesswoman, philanthropist and patron of publishing, going beyond existing studies in English.Dr. Birnbaum's The Long Journey of Gracia Mendes, however, goes beyond in detailing La Señora's acumen as gifted businesswoman, who, as CEO of the banking and trading firm that dominated the spice trade, used effective economic leadership skills to bring the House of Mendes to new heights of prosperity.Other writers allude to her success in passing, but Dr. Birnbaum adds examples of specific business deals so one can see the great lady's skills in action.An example is the chapter "In Business with Ragusa," in which the author describes a contract negotiated by Doña Gracia for her firm with the port city, now called Dubrovnik, so fortuitously positioned between Europe and the Ottoman Empire.Elsewhere, Dr. Birnbaum's expertise in the political economy of the period enhances the reader's comprehension of the banking and trading of the day, with information such as the relative values of period currency and products traded.She also takes care to present the background to the events she covers.Dr. Birnbaum's scholarship is artfully combined with her writer's understanding that readers need more than a chronological recounting of events for the true picture to emerge of personages and periods long gone.Her approach, and its reasons, are clear in the book's final paragraph of homage.MARIANNA D. BIRNBAUM taught Hungarian and Central European literature and culture at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she is Professor Emeritus.She also serves as visiting professor at Central European University, Budapest, in the Medieval Department.


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