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Wrong Marian Friestad?

Marian Friestad

President and Fellow

Society for Consumer Psychology

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Society for Consumer Psychology

Background Information

Employment History

Associate Professor of Marketing

U. of Oregon


Web References(44 Total References)


Why we lie about money and debt - Home Equity Loans Center.com

www.home-equity-loans-center.com [cached]

"In the United States, talking about money is harder than talking about sex," says Marian Friestad, Ph.D., professor of marketing at the Lundquist College of Business at the University of Oregon and past president and fellow of the Society for Consumer Psychology.
Friestad says that the survey answers indicate the deep connection between our financial lives and our view of ourselves. "Our relationship to money is complex, and often a love-hate relationship," says Friestad. Friestad says that Bankrate's findings jibe with a general psychiatric principle often called the "third-person effect." "It comes from research on consumer perceptions of how ads and marketing affect people," describes Friestad. "People say, 'I'm not influenced by ads, but everyone else is.' And everyone says that, which is inconsistent. There is a sense that we make perception errors, that we understand our own situation and tend to think of the rest of the population as having more problems or being more susceptible to mismanaging their finances." While it is easy to write this off as simple denial, Friestad says it's more than that. "We understand our own behavior as being very complex and situational," says Friestad.


www.socialpsychologyarena.com

By David Boush, Marian Friestad, Peter Wright Now, Boush, Friestad, and Wright have provided us with a very thorough treatise on the topic.Marian Friestad is the Vice-Provost for Graduate Studies at the University of Oregon, and Professor of Marketing in the Lundquist College of Business.She was previously Dean of the Graduate School at Oregon, and a visiting scholar at Stanford University.Professor Friestad's research on persuasion and social influence has been heavily cited and won a best paper award from the Journal of Consumer Research.Her work has been published in the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Consumer Psychology, Psychology & Marketing, Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, and Communication Research.Professor Friestad is a past president and Fellow of the Society for Consumer Psychology.


www.personalwealthjournal.com

In the United States, talking about money is harder than talking about sex," says Marian Friestad, Ph.D., professor of marketing at the Lundquist College of Business at the University of Oregon and past president and fellow of the Society for Consumer Psychology.Friestad says that the survey answers indicate the deep connection between our financial lives and our view of ourselves."Our relationship to money is complex, and often a love-hate relationship," says Friestad.


thedailyreview.com

"Necessities we purchase regularly are habitual, and we become less sensitive to their price," said Marian Friestad, Ph.D. former president of the Society for Consumer Psychology."Gas consumption is not the sort of thing we can significantly change, because there are not readily available alternatives."While anecdotal evidence suggests people are combining trips to run errands, or taking short walks rather than driving, those alternations are minor, Dr. Friestad said. People may factor the increased cost of travel into future decision-making, she said, such as purchasing a more fuel-efficient vehicle or moving into a home or apartment closer to work, but those decision may be a year or two away.


citizensvoice.com

"Necessities we purchase regularly are habitual, and we become less sensitive to their price," said Dr. Marian Friestad, former president of the Society for Consumer Psychology."Gas consumption is not the sort of thing we can significantly change, because there are not readily available alternatives."While anecdotal evidence suggests people are combining trips to run errands, or taking short walks rather than driving, those alternations are minor, Friestad said. People may factor the increased cost of travel into future decision-making, she said, such as purchasing a more fuel-efficient vehicle or moving into a home or apartment closer to work, but those decision may be a year or two away.


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