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This profile was last updated on 2/28/15  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Maria Carrion-Kozak

Wrong Maria Carrion-Kozak?

Local Address: , Colorado, United States
Highline Academy
7808 Cherry Creek Drive South Suite 304
Denver , Colorado 80231
United States

Company Description: Highline Academy is a small K-8 liberal arts public school designed to educate Denver's diverse student population. We graduate individuals well-prepared for...   more
Background

Employment History

Education

  • master's degree
    University of Northern Colorado
12 Total References
Web References
Staff | Highline Academy
www.highlineacademy.org, 28 Feb 2015 [cached]
Maria Carrion-Kozak
Vail Daily News for Vail and Beaver Creek Colorado - News
www.vaildaily.com, 18 April 2005 [cached]
"There's a perception that Latinos don't want to learn English, but that's not true," said Maria Carrion-Kozak of Silt, who has worked as an English-As-A-Second Language teacher at Rifle High School and teaches Spanish classes at Colorado Mountain College."A lot of the ESL classes are full.And these people work all day - sometimes 10 to 12 hours - and don't have time to go to an ESL class.Another problem is the lack of education in their own language.It makes it difficult to learn a new language."
Carrion-Kozak is a native of Venezuela and moved to the United States in 1980 to attend college in Boston."I came over to go to college and learn English," she said.
...
"In 1990, there was already an influx of people from Mexico moving in who didn't speak English," Carrion-Kozak said."I realized that there was a big need to teach Anglos about the Latin American culture."
After a stint with the Aspen Police Department, she started teaching Spanish at Colorado Mountain College in Glenwood Springs.
"It's always been my philosophy that for foreign-language classes, a native speaker is the best - they can teach the language and the culture," Carrion-Kozak said."I think a lot of people in this valley are learning the importance of learning another language."
Many Latino families still speak their native tongue at home, she said.
"The parents will still speak Spanish," Carrion-Kozak said.
...
Those include food, values, the way the family is structured and daily living principles, Carrion-Kozak said.
"Americans are so busy," she said."Latinos are more laid back.They work to be able to live - not live to work."
The Latin culture is also a lot more demonstrative in the way they communicate - with hand gestures, hugs and kisses, she said.
"We talk very up close and we touch," Carrion-Kozak said with a laugh."We're louder."
Latino families typically have strong family ties and religious beliefs."A family gathering includes lots of food and dancing for the grown-ups, teenagers and the kids," Carrion-Kozak said.
...
"A lot come here because of the work opportunity," Carrion-Kozak said."Most Latinos are not planning to stay, but if things don't get better in their country, they do stay.
"And even though the jobs (here) may be paying poorly," she added, "it's better than what they could get at home."
Colorado is an attractive location to Latinos, not only because of the close proximity to the border, but because the mountainous terrain and the climate remind them of home.Now re-married and with two more children, Carrion-Kozak is a permanent resident of the U.S., but still misses her country, she said.
"I miss my Latino culture," she said, wiping away a tear.
View Article
www.aspendailynews.com, 19 Aug 2003 [cached]
"None of these students had a computer at home," said Maria Carrion-Kozak, head of Rifle High School's foreign language department and the club's advisor.
...
That puts students without home computers at a disadvantage, Carrion-Kozak said, and with some exceptions, it mostly splits between Anglos and Latinos, widening a gap between them based on language.
...
Carrion-Kozak said that's made a big difference to her students.
"After we won (the competition) and after they got the computers, they were just excited to be at school," she said, "because they began to see little by little, that now they have a chance to make it at school."
Glenwood Springs Post Independent - Valley News
www.glenwoodindependent.com, 4 April 2005 [cached]
"There's a perception that Latinos don't want to learn English, but that's not true," said Maria Carrion-Kozak, of Silt, who has worked as an ESL teacher at Rifle High School and teaches Spanish classes at Colorado Mountain College."A lot of the ESL classes are full.And these people work all day - sometimes 10-12 hours - and don't have time to go to an ESL class.Another problem is the lack of education in their own language.It makes it difficult to learn a new language."Carrion-Kozak is a native of Venezuela and moved to the United States in 1980 to attend college in Boston."I came over to go to college and learn English," she said."But I had a really good life before moving here.I was a music teacher and I was making good money."She eventually married an Anglo and moved to Denver, but the marriage did not work out.Having vacationed in the Roaring Fork Valley, where she was reminded of her home country by the mountains and friendly people, she decided to move here with her two children."In 1990, there was already an influx of people from Mexico moving in who didn't speak English," Carrion-Kozak said."I realized that there was a big need to teach Anglos about the Latin American culture."After a stint with the Aspen Police Department, she started teaching Spanish at CMC in Glenwood Springs."It's always been my philosophy that for foreign language classes, a native speaker is the best - they can teach the language and the culture," Carrion-Kozak said."I think a lot of people in this valley are learning the importance of learning another language."Many Latino families still speak their native tongue at home."The parents will still speak Spanish," Carrion-Kozak said.
...
Those include food, values, the way the family is structured and daily living principles, Carrion-Kozak said."Americans are so busy," she said."Latinos are more laid back.They work to be able to live - not live to work."The Latin culture is also a lot more demonstrative in the way they communicate - with hand gestures, hugs and kisses, she said."We talk very up close and we touch," Carrion-Kozak said with a laugh."We're louder."Latino families typically have strong family ties and religious beliefs."A family gathering includes lots of food and dancing for the grown-ups, teenagers and the kids," Carrion-Kozak said.
...
"A lot come here because of the work opportunity," Carrion-Kozak said."Most Latinos are not planning to stay, but if things don't get better in their country, they do stay.And even though the jobs (here) may be paying poorly, it's better than what they could get at home."Colorado is an attractive location to Latinos, not only because of the close proximity to the border, but because the mountainous terrain and the climate remind them of home.Now re-married and with two more children, Carrion-Kozak is a permanent resident of the U.S., but still misses her country."I miss my Latino culture," she said, wiping away a tear.
DenverPost.com - Diane Carman
www.denverpost.com, 25 May 2003 [cached]
Rifle High School Spanish teacher Maria Carrion-Kozak saw some information about a program at the University of Denver Center for Teaching International Relations.She was the adviser for the International Affairs Club.This looked interesting.
Carrion-Kozak is from Venezuela, and, as it turned out, the 20 students who joined the club were all Latinos - some first-generation immigrants from Mexico and El Salvador.
...
Carrion-Kozak admits she was freaked.
"I was not prepared for this at all," she said."I'm a Spanish teacher.I have no background in this."
But the students were eager, so she enlisted Kim Goossens, a school board member, to help with the project, and they went to work.
The kids began doing research after school.None of them had a personal computer at home, so most of the work was done at the homes of Carrion-Kozak and Goossens.
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