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This profile was last updated on 5/6/12  and contains information from public web pages.

Maria R. Audubon

Wrong Maria R. Audubon?

Warden

Phone: (323) ***-****  HQ Phone
Audubon Center
4700 North Griffin Ave. (323) 2212255
Los Angeles, California 90031
United States

Company Description: Audubon South Carolina is managed and administered from its headquarters located near Harleyville at its Audubon Center at Francis Beidler Forest.
Background

Employment History

  • Warden
    Pelican Island

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Founder
    Everglades Conservation Office
Web References
Audubon of Florida
fl.audubon.org, 27 Sept 2011 [cached]
A little later, the list grew to include President Grover Cleveland, Florida Governor W.S. Jennings, ornithologist Theodore S. Palmer, and Maria R. Audubon.
...
Audubon hires Paul Kroegel as the first warden of Pelican Island.
...
The murder sparks the nation's conscience and Audubon intensifies its nationwide campaign against the wearing of feathers.
The 1910s and 1920s: Gaining Ground, Losing Ground Audubon lost some ground in the 1910s, when the Audubon Warden program suffered from a lack of funding and wardens were withdrawn from Florida. In "The Florida Audubon Society: 1900-1935," Lucy Worthington Blackman recounts: "The Alligator Bay rookery [in southwest Everglades], the largest egret rookery in Florida, was shot out and burned that year by hunters, simply for lack of $750 for wardens to protect it - burned so that the remnants of the colony would abandon the place ... Three Audubon wardens had carried the eight hundred egrets in the colony safely through the 1915 nesting season. The next year they were abandoned to their fate."'
But Audubon still made major strides in conservation during this era through the establishment of sanctuaries, passage of important legislation like the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and after years of battle, the establishment of the State Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
...
By 1914, 30,000 leaflets had been distributed and Audubon in Florida boasted more than 3,500 members and 162 Junior Audubon Clubs.
...
Alligator Bay Rookery in southwest Everglades is wiped out in the absence of Audubon wardens.
Audubon celebrates the creation of National Park Service.
...
After years of efforts, Audubon succeeds in getting the legislature to pass two acts, one creating a Department of Game and Fresh Water Fish, and the other establishing a State Game Commissioner.
...
Marvin Chandler becomes the first in a series of family members to serve as Audubon wardens to patrol Kissimmee Prairie and Lake Okeechobee.
...
By the 1950s, Audubon expands the focus of the Tavernier Science Center to include all aspects of the Florida Bay and Florida Keys environment, ranging from corals, seagrasses and mangroves, to game fishes, crocodiles and Bald Eagles.
...
Audubon works with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Ira Gabrielson to salvage the Whooping Crane from the jaws of extinction.
...
By the 1950s technological advances presented Audubon with new and more complex threats to wildlife than the market hunting of the early days. Audubon expanded its scientific research programs and became heavily involved in the effort to ban the use of pesticides that were suspected of causing population failures in eagles, ospreys, brown pelicans, and other "end-of-chain" consumers.
...
After the release of Rachel Carson's book "Silent Spring," Audubon launches campaign to ban toxic pesticides.
...
Audubon continues its commitment to the Bald Eagle by serving on the Southeast Bald Eagle Recovery Team to establish protection for the eagle once it is removed from the endangered species list, and by rehabilitating and releasing injured eagles at Audubon's Center for Birds of Prey in Maitland.
1964 Audubon celebrates legislative successes including the Water Conservation Act, the Wilderness Act, and the state's Outdoor Recreational Lands program.
...
Audubon worked to develop major new federal policies and laws for endangered species, clean air and water, and wild and scenic rivers.
...
Audubon blocks a proposed jetport in Big Cypress.
...
After a long battle with Audubon in the forefront, DDT and DDE are banned from use in the U.S.
...
Audubon plays role in setting strict regulations for oil drilling in Big Cypress.
1973 Congress passes Endangered Species Act.
Audubon pushes the state to pass oil and gas rules and regulations.
1974 Congress establishes Big Cypress National Preserve.
1976 Audubon's Peter C.H. Pritchard calls a meeting of experts to discuss a recovery plan for the Florida Panther.
...
Audubon encourages the purchase of North Key Largo lands and begins restoration projects in the Florida Keys with support from Environmental Protection Agency's Florida Keys Environmental Trust Fund.
1987 Surface Water Improvement and Management Act [SWIM] is approved by the Legislature.
Audubon supports the expansion of Big Cypress National Preserve by 115,000 acres through an Arizona land exchange.
...
In addition, Audubon played a strategic role in placing the Conservation Amendment on the ballot in 1998, and led the campaign to see it ratified by an overwhelming majority of voters, showing that Floridians - across the board - care about the environment.
...
Upon the suggestion of Audubon, Disney purchases Walker Ranch as mitigation, giving birth to the "Disney Wilderness Preserve."
Audubon establishes Everglades Conservation Office in Miami to ensure the restoration and conservation of the Greater
...
Audubon serves on Constitutional Revision Commission, which places "Conservation Amendment" on the ballot.
1998 Audubon leads campaign to see Amendment 5 ratified by over 70% of voters.
1999 Florida Audubon and National Audubon unify their efforts in Florida, becoming a stronger, more effective Audubon of Florida. At the turn of the century, Audubon of Florida boasts 40,000 members in 45 community based chapters throughout the state.
Audubon of Florida
www.audubonofflorida.org, 4 July 2006 [cached]
A little later, the list grew to include President Grover Cleveland, Florida Governor W.S. Jennings, ornithologist Theodore S. Palmer, and Maria R. Audubon.
...
Audubon hires Paul Kroegel as the first warden of Pelican Island.
...
The murder sparks the nation's conscience and Audubon intensifies its nationwide campaign against the wearing of feathers.
The 1910s and 1920s: Gaining Ground, Losing Ground Audubon lost some ground in the 1910s, when the Audubon Warden program suffered from a lack of funding and wardens were withdrawn from Florida. In "The Florida Audubon Society: 1900-1935," Lucy Worthington Blackman recounts: "The Alligator Bay rookery [in southwest Everglades], the largest egret rookery in Florida, was shot out and burned that year by hunters, simply for lack of $750 for wardens to protect it - burned so that the remnants of the colony would abandon the place ... Three Audubon wardens had carried the eight hundred egrets in the colony safely through the 1915 nesting season. The next year they were abandoned to their fate."'
But Audubon still made major strides in conservation during this era through the establishment of sanctuaries, passage of important legislation like the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and after years of battle, the establishment of the State Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.
...
By 1914, 30,000 leaflets had been distributed and Audubon in Florida boasted more than 3,500 members and 162 Junior Audubon Clubs.
...
Alligator Bay Rookery in southwest Everglades is wiped out in the absence of Audubon wardens.
Audubon celebrates the creation of National Park Service.
...
After years of efforts, Audubon succeeds in getting the legislature to pass two acts, one creating a Department of Game and Fresh Water Fish, and the other establishing a State Game Commissioner.
...
Marvin Chandler becomes the first in a series of family members to serve as Audubon wardens to patrol Kissimmee Prairie and Lake Okeechobee.
...
By the 1950s, Audubon expands the focus of the Tavernier Science Center to include all aspects of the Florida Bay and Florida Keys environment, ranging from corals, seagrasses and mangroves, to game fishes, crocodiles and Bald Eagles.
...
Audubon works with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Ira Gabrielson to salvage the Whooping Crane from the jaws of extinction.
...
By the 1950s technological advances presented Audubon with new and more complex threats to wildlife than the market hunting of the early days. Audubon expanded its scientific research programs and became heavily involved in the effort to ban the use of pesticides that were suspected of causing population failures in eagles, ospreys, brown pelicans, and other "end-of-chain" consumers.
...
After the release of Rachel Carson's book "Silent Spring," Audubon launches campaign to ban toxic pesticides.
...
Audubon continues its commitment to the Bald Eagle by serving on the Southeast Bald Eagle Recovery Team to establish protection for the eagle once it is removed from the endangered species list, and by rehabilitating and releasing injured eagles at Audubon's Center for Birds of Prey in Maitland.
1964 Audubon celebrates legislative successes including the Water Conservation Act, the Wilderness Act, and the state's Outdoor Recreational Lands program.
...
Audubon worked to develop major new federal policies and laws for endangered species, clean air and water, and wild and scenic rivers.
...
Audubon blocks a proposed jetport in Big Cypress.
...
Today, Audubon and Florida Defenders of the Environment continue the fight to remove the Rodman Dam and let the Ocklawaha River run free.
1972 After a long battle with Audubon in the forefront, DDT and DDE are banned from use in the U.S.
...
Audubon plays role in setting strict regulations for oil drilling in Big Cypress.
1973 Congress passes Endangered Species Act.
Audubon pushes the state to pass oil and gas rules and regulations.
1974 Congress establishes Big Cypress National Preserve.
1976 Audubon's Peter C.H. Pritchard calls a meeting of experts to discuss a recovery plan for the Florida Panther.
...
Establishment of Audubon's Center for Birds of Prey. Since opening, more than 3,000 raptors have been treated and released, including 217 Bald Eagles.
...
Audubon encourages the purchase of North Key Largo lands and begins restoration projects in the Florida Keys with support from Environmental Protection Agency's Florida Keys Environmental Trust Fund.
1987 Surface Water Improvement and Management Act [SWIM] is approved by the Legislature.
Audubon supports the expansion of Big Cypress National Preserve by 115,000 acres through an Arizona land exchange.
...
In addition, Audubon played a strategic role in placing the Conservation Amendment on the ballot in 1998, and led the campaign to see it ratified by an overwhelming majority of voters, showing that Floridians - across the board - care about the environment.
...
Upon the suggestion of Audubon, Disney purchases Walker Ranch as mitigation, giving birth to the "Disney Wilderness Preserve."
Audubon establishes Everglades Conservation Office in Miami to ensure the restoration and conservation of the Greater
...
Audubon serves on Constitutional Revision Commission, which places "Conservation Amendment" on the ballot.
1998 Audubon leads campaign to see Amendment 5 ratified by over 70% of voters.
1999 Florida Audubon and National Audubon unify their efforts in Florida, becoming a stronger, more effective Audubon of Florida. At the turn of the century, Audubon of Florida boasts 40,000 members in 45 community based chapters throughout the state.
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