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Wrong Christopher Lowry?

Christopher A. Lowry

Assistant Professor

University of Colorado

Direct Phone: (303) ***-****direct phone

Email: l***@***.edu

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University of Colorado

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Web References(128 Total References)


Articles by Jessica Snyder Sachs: Popular Science Archives

www.jessicasachs.com [cached]

That dovetails with the work of University of Colorado neuroscientist Christopher Lowry, who last May published a study where he used M. vaccae in psychotropic experiments with rats.
Lowry discovered that the bug increased brain levels of the mood-enhancing hormone serotonin and decreased depressive behavior. Even more promising, Lowry showed that M. vaccae appeared to be more discriminating than antidepressant drugs in the kinds of brain neurons it activates. It switches on the serotonin neurons associated with enhancing mood, without stimulating those that increase hyperalertness-that is, anxiety and sleeplessness. "Prozac without the side effects," he calls it.


Nonviolent Cow : FeaturedArticle/Nature's Bounty: Soil Salvation browse

www.nonviolentworm.org [cached]

In 2007, University of Colorado neuroscientist Christopher Lowry, then working at Bristol University in England, made a startling discovery.
He found that certain strains of soil-borne mycobacteria sharply stimulated the human immune system. M. vaccae triggers a complex cascade of neurosignaling, says Lowry, who is trying to decipher the exact mechanism. But in the process, the bacteria stimulate immune cells to raise the threshold for inflammatory processes. Mycobacteria also interact with the nervous system to rev up production of serotonin. Lowry is now conducting oral trials of the bacteria in mice to mimic our own exposure to mycobacteria. By contrast, Lowry finds, mycobacteria "are very selective and specific.


immodulon.com

Dr Christopher Lowry
Christopher A. Lowry, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Integrative Physiology at the University of Colorado Boulder, with a secondary appointment in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R), University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, School of Medicine, a member of the Centers for Neuroscience at CU-Boulder and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, a Principal Investigator in the Department of Veterans Affairs Eastern Colorado Health Care System, VA Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research, Education, & Clinical Center (MIRECC), Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC), and director of the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory at CU-Boulder. Dr Lowry was recently awarded a Young Investigator award from the Brain & Behaviour Research Foundation, a National Science Foundation CAREER award, and the Donald F. Klein Early Career Investigator Award from the Anxiety Disorders Association of America. He is a member of The American Gut Consortium, working to characterize the human gut microbiome based on data from a sample of >5000 individuals in The American Gut Project. He is also Co-Founder and Co-Director, with Dr. Lisa Brenner, of the Military and Veteran Microbiome Consortium for Research and Education (MVM-CoRE). Dr Lowry's research program focuses on understanding 1) stress-related physiology and behaviour with an emphasis on the role of serotonin, a chemical signaling molecule in the body and the brain, and 2) neural mechanisms underlying anxiety and affective disorders, and development of novel strategies for both the prevention and treatment of these disorders and their medical comorbidity, such as allergy, asthma, and inflammatory bowel disease. He has published ~115 peer-reviewed articles and is currently an editorial board member for Stress: The International Journal on the Biology of Stress. The Office of Naval Research, National Institutes of Health, Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Research and Development (VA-ORD), Colorado Clinical & Translational Sciences Institute (CCTSI) Center for Neuroscience, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation currently fund his research. He joined Immodulon's Scientific Advisory Board in March 2016.


Sauna prevents depression - Blackchurch Leisure - Bleisure.com

bleisure.com [cached]

Christopher Lowry, researcher at the University of Colorado, has made groundbreaking discoveries on the relationship between heat and well being.
- Intuitively, we all know that heat makes us feel good. This has been the point of departure for our research, Lowry says in the scientific journal Colorado Arts and Sciences. Lowry has identified a group of neurons in the brain that releases increased amounts of serotonin in the body when the body temperature is elevated. - We believe there might be a link between the system that is activated when the body is trying to cool down, and the feeling of relaxation and well being, Lowry says.


www.amerec.com

Christopher Lowry, researcher at the University of Colorado, has made groundbreaking discoveries conserning the relationship between heat and wellbeing.
- Intuitively, we all know that heat makes us feel good. This has been the point of departure for our research, Lowry says in the scientific journal Colorado Arts and Sciences. In his research, Lowry has identified a group of neurons in the brain that releases increased amounts of serotonin in the body when the body temperature is elevated. - We believe there might be a link between the system that is activated when the body is trying to cool down, and the feeling of relaxation and wellbeing, Lowry says.


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