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This profile was last updated on 10/15/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Editor, Covert Action Quarterly

Museum of Hidden History
P.O. Box 772
Washington Dc , District of Columbia 20044
United States

 
Background

Employment History

  • Co-Editor
    Covert Action Information Bulletin
  • Co-Publisher
    Covert Action Information Bulletin
  • Co-Founder and Publisher
    Covert Action Quarterly
  • Co-founder and Director of Research
    Covert Action Quarterly
  • Publisher
    Covert Action Quarterly
  • Associate Editor
    Rock Creek Free Press
  • Staff Member
    Rock Creek Free Press
  • Editor
    Covert Action Magazine

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Founder
    Covert Action Information Bulletin
70 Total References
Web References
Our Sponsors & Board | Museum of Hidden History
museumofhiddenhistory.org, 15 Oct 2014 [cached]
? Louis Wolf, editor, Covert Action Quarterly
diGenova & Toensing, LLP
www.digenovatoensing.com, 16 Mar 2007 [cached]
In 1980, Louis Wolf, co-editor of the Covert Action Information Bulletin, publicly claimed 15 U.S. officials in Jamaica were CIA. He provided addresses and telephone numbers, information not considered "classified.
Song:Louis Wolf, co-founder, ...
abmp3.com, 20 Nov 2010 [cached]
Song:Louis Wolf, co-founder, Covert Action Information KUCI Subversity 14 January 2008 Show.mp3
...
Artist: Louis Wolf, co-founder, Covert Action Information Bulletin, ...
"It's a giant fishing expedition," said ...
www.beyond-the-illusion.com, 30 Oct 2001 [cached]
"It's a giant fishing expedition," said Louis Wolf, co-publisher of Covert Action, a quarterly magazine."The fact that the U.S. has managed to achieve this capability to achieve this level of surveillance technologically as well as politically should be a very disturbing fact for people who are learning about it for the first time."The current hubbub over an espionage system that has reportedly been operating, in some form, since the early '70s, has been gaining steam since January, when the European Parliament acknowledged its existence in a report entitled "An Appraisal of Technology of Political Control."
...
"I would acknowledge a need for intelligence gathering," said Wolf."What worries me is not the fact that we have it, but its applications."Glyn Ford, a British member of the European Parliament, agrees."Basically, we don't have a problem with the notion of electronic surveillance, what we want to make sure there is some sort of degree of democratic control " who's listening to what and what use the information is put to."The parliament has recently commissioned a second report, due out next summer, to investigate allegations that the collected information has been used for commercial espionage to give U.S. companies an edge in competition with European corporations.In one of numerous allegations that have surfaced in press reports, French airplane manufacturer Airbus Industrie reportedly lost a $1-billion contract to Boeing and McDonnell Douglas because of information allegedly passed along by U.S. intelligence.The Free Congress Foundation report asserts that such pilfering is a regular process and that the Department of Commerce's Office of Intelligence Liaison regularly passes along such sensitive information to interested corporations.
...
"I don't really believe that they're able to interpret that much," added Wolf.And, points out Ford, the growing clamor over the hi-tech spy technology may be all for naught."There are allegations of misuse, there is no proof of misuse," Ford noted.
...
Wolf isn't sure how much attention the surveillance network can possibly receive from the lawmakers.Congress "will discuss perhaps a portion of it " a smaller portion of it," he said, noting a possible sticking point: "All the members of the House or Senate intelligence committee are sworn to secrecy."
...
"It's a giant fishing expedition," said Louis Wolf, co-publisher of Covert Action, a quarterly magazine."The fact that the U.S. has managed to achieve this capability to achieve this level of surveillance technologically as well as politically should be a very disturbing fact for people who are learning about it for the first time."The current hubbub over an espionage system that has reportedly been operating, in some form, since the early '70s, has been gaining steam since January, when the European Parliament acknowledged its existence in a report entitled "An Appraisal of Technology of Political Control."
...
"I would acknowledge a need for intelligence gathering," said Wolf."What worries me is not the fact that we have it, but its applications."Glyn Ford, a British member of the European Parliament, agrees."Basically, we don't have a problem with the notion of electronic surveillance, what we want to make sure there is some sort of degree of democratic control " who's listening to what and what use the information is put to."The parliament has recently commissioned a second report, due out next summer, to investigate allegations that the collected information has been used for commercial espionage to give U.S. companies an edge in competition with European corporations.In one of numerous allegations that have surfaced in press reports, French airplane manufacturer Airbus Industrie reportedly lost a $1-billion contract to Boeing and McDonnell Douglas because of information allegedly passed along by U.S. intelligence.The Free Congress Foundation report asserts that such pilfering is a regular process and that the Department of Commerce's Office of Intelligence Liaison regularly passes along such sensitive information to interested corporations.
...
"I don't really believe that they're able to interpret that much," added Wolf.And, points out Ford, the growing clamor over the hi-tech spy technology may be all for naught."There are allegations of misuse, there is no proof of misuse," Ford noted.
...
Wolf isn't sure how much attention the surveillance network can possibly receive from the lawmakers.Congress "will discuss perhaps a portion of it " a smaller portion of it," he said, noting a possible sticking point: "All the members of the House or Senate intelligence committee are sworn to secrecy."
DC Indymedia: newswire
dc.indymedia.org [cached]
Lou Wolf is the co-founder and publisher of Covert Action Quarterly.
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