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Wrong Lorna Cervantes?

Ms. Lorna Dee Cervantes

UC Regents Lecturer

Berkeley

HQ Phone: (510) 845-7793

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Berkeley

2736 Bancroft Way

Berkeley, California 94704

United States

Company Description

The first school of public health west of the Mississippi, the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health was founded in 1943 on the Berkeley campus. It is one of 50 schools accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health. The UC ... more

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Background Information

Employment History

Independent Scholar: Poet, Philosopher

Self-Employed

Professor

University of Colorado

Associate Professor of English

University of Colorado at Boulder

Ethnic Studies Lecturer

San Francisco State University

Chicana Activist

Sacramento Poetry Center

Affiliations

Founder
MANGO PRODUCTIONS

Education

San Jose State College

San Jose State University

PhD

philosophy and aesthetics

bachelor's degree

fine arts

California State University , Los Angeles

Web References (195 Total References)


Other Latinas whose books have been ...

latinopia.com [cached]

Other Latinas whose books have been reviewed here-Nicholasa Mohr, Estela Portillo, Lorna Dee Cervantes, and Cherrié Moraga-beat Cisneros to those accomplishments.

...
by Lorna Dee Cervantes
...
Lorna Dee Cervantes (b. 1954) is a California native of Mexican-American and Native-American heritage. Her impact on Chicana poetry prior to and since the publication of her iconic, American Book Award-winning collection of poems, Emplumada (1981), has been tremendous. Her fellow Latino poet, Alurista, once referred to her as "probably the best Chicana poet active today," and others consider her to be one of the pre-eminent Chicana poets of the past four decades. During the Clinton presidency, Cervantes was invited to a special White House event honoring the top 100 poets in the United States at that time.
Her path to fame began with the Chicano activism and literary movement of the 1970's. In 1974, she began reading her poetry publicly and now counts over 500 readings, poetic performances, and lectures in venues including the top universities in America: Princeton, Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Brown, Vassar, and Cornell. Besides the American Book Award in 1982, Cervantes has won over 20 notable prizes, fellowships, and other honors, such as the Latino Book Award, Latin American Book Award, Patterson Prize for Poetry, and two Pushcart Prizes. Cervantes is a lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley.
As an academic for most of her career, Cervantes continues to exert a major influence on American Latina poetry, despite authoring only three poetry collections besides Emplumada. These are: From the Cables of Genocide: Poems on Love and Hunger (1991); DRIVE: The First Quartet (2006); and Ciento: 100 100-Word Love Poems (2011). She founded the literary review Mango in the 1970's and was co-editor of the multicultural poetry journal Red Dirt. Her poems have been anthologized since the 1990's and have attracted wide critical study since the 1980's.
Emplumada -which means "feathered" as well as "pen flourish"-treats the social issues of Cervantes' day that still rattle our sensibilities: poverty, domestic and drug abuse, sexism, racism, classism. We relive these through the eyes and heart of a 27-year-old Latina clarifying her place in life. Cervantes occasionally spices her 39 poems with Spanish words and phrases that resonate with her Hispanic readers yet do not detract from the universality of her clear-eyed observations.
Her poetry makes us weep in recognition. Or weep for the deep slashes to humanity that she lays bare in her unvarnished way, capturing the pain we often inflict on one another in unconscious or purposeful ways. Her book begins with one of the more powerful poems, "Uncle's First Rabbit," a compressed retelling of 50 years of misery. At the age of 10, Uncle is forced by his drunken, violent father to shoot, then bash to death, an innocent rabbit. The rabbit's dying cries remind the child of the night his father kicked his pregnant mother till her aborted baby died, his tiny sister's cries like the rabbit's. Throughout his military years and his own marriage, the Uncle is haunted by his father's abuse, and he can't escape the "bastard's...bloodline" within himself, a man tormented by demons who one night "awaken[s] to find himself slugging the bloodied face of his [own] wife. The Uncle's humanity gasps its last breath as he watches his dying wife in bed and thinks: "Die, you bitch. I'll live to watch you die."
Lorna Dee Cervantes
The theme of abuse runs like an unavoidable snake through several of Cervantes' poems. In "Meeting Mescalito at Oak Hill Cemetery," a 16-year-old girl "crooked with drug" momentarily escapes her family life by drinking alone in a cemetery but then, at home, "lock[s] my bedroom door against the stepfather.
...
Cervantes also celebrates love, often by weaving this with nature, with the natural rhythms of existence that are often overlooked in harried lives. For her, nature is a balm that opens eyes and rekindles the spirit. In "Beneath the Shadow of the Freeway," the speaker describes her partner thus: "Every night I sleep with a gentle man to the hymn of mockingbirds, and in time, I plant geraniums.
...
Cervantes is, in the end, a poet who prefers to see the proverbial glass half-full but whose life experience has shown her the half-empty part in sharp focus. In perhaps the most autobiographical piece in the book-"Poem for the Young White Man Who Asked Me How I, an Intelligent, Well-Read Person, Could Believe in the War Between Races"-she explains clearly how conflict indeed exists: "I'm marked by the color of my skin.


LATINOPIA BOOK REVIEW | latinopia.com

latinopia.com [cached]

Other Latinas whose books have been reviewed here-Nicholasa Mohr, Estela Portillo, Lorna Dee Cervantes, and Cherrié Moraga-beat Cisneros to those accomplishments.

...
LATINOPIA BOOK REVIEW 'EMPLUMADA" By Lorna Dee Cervantes
...
by Lorna Dee Cervantes
...
Lorna Dee Cervantes (b. 1954) is a California native of Mexican-American and Native-American heritage. Her impact on Chicana poetry prior to and since the publication of her iconic, American Book Award-winning collection of poems, Emplumada (1981), has been tremendous. Her fellow Latino poet, Alurista, once referred to her as "probably the best Chicana poet active today," and others consider her to be one of the pre-eminent Chicana poets of the past four decades. During the Clinton presidency, Cervantes was invited to a special White House event honoring the top 100 poets in the United States at that time.
Her path to fame began with the Chicano activism and literary movement of the 1970's. In 1974, she began reading her poetry publicly and now counts over 500 readings, poetic performances, and lectures in venues including the top universities in America: Princeton, Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Brown, Vassar, and Cornell. Besides the American Book Award in 1982, Cervantes has won over 20 notable prizes, fellowships, and other honors, such as the Latino Book Award, Latin American Book Award, Patterson Prize for Poetry, and two Pushcart Prizes. Cervantes is a lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley.
As an academic for most of her career, Cervantes continues to exert a major influence on American Latina poetry, despite authoring only three poetry collections besides Emplumada. These are: From the Cables of Genocide: Poems on Love and Hunger (1991); DRIVE: The First Quartet (2006); and Ciento: 100 100-Word Love Poems (2011). She founded the literary review Mango in the 1970's and was co-editor of the multicultural poetry journal Red Dirt. Her poems have been anthologized since the 1990's and have attracted wide critical study since the 1980's.
...
Cervantes occasionally spices her 39 poems with Spanish words and phrases that resonate with her Hispanic readers yet do not detract from the universality of her clear-eyed observations.
Her poetry makes us weep in recognition. Or weep for the deep slashes to humanity that she lays bare in her unvarnished way, capturing the pain we often inflict on one another in unconscious or purposeful ways. Her book begins with one of the more powerful poems, "Uncle's First Rabbit," a compressed retelling of 50 years of misery. At the age of 10, Uncle is forced by his drunken, violent father to shoot, then bash to death, an innocent rabbit. The rabbit's dying cries remind the child of the night his father kicked his pregnant mother till her aborted baby died, his tiny sister's cries like the rabbit's. Throughout his military years and his own marriage, the Uncle is haunted by his father's abuse, and he can't escape the "bastard's...bloodline" within himself, a man tormented by demons who one night "awaken[s] to find himself slugging the bloodied face of his [own] wife. The Uncle's humanity gasps its last breath as he watches his dying wife in bed and thinks: "Die, you bitch. I'll live to watch you die."
Lorna Dee Cervantes
The theme of abuse runs like an unavoidable snake through several of Cervantes' poems. In "Meeting Mescalito at Oak Hill Cemetery," a 16-year-old girl "crooked with drug" momentarily escapes her family life by drinking alone in a cemetery but then, at home, "lock[s] my bedroom door against the stepfather.
...
Cervantes also celebrates love, often by weaving this with nature, with the natural rhythms of existence that are often overlooked in harried lives. For her, nature is a balm that opens eyes and rekindles the spirit. In "Beneath the Shadow of the Freeway," the speaker describes her partner thus: "Every night I sleep with a gentle man to the hymn of mockingbirds, and in time, I plant geraniums.
...
Cervantes is, in the end, a poet who prefers to see the proverbial glass half-full but whose life experience has shown her the half-empty part in sharp focus. In perhaps the most autobiographical piece in the book-"Poem for the Young White Man Who Asked Me How I, an Intelligent, Well-Read Person, Could Believe in the War Between Races"-she explains clearly how conflict indeed exists: "I'm marked by the color of my skin.


with Poet Lorna Dee ...

calpolynews.calpoly.edu [cached]

with Poet Lorna Dee Cervantes

SAN LUIS OBISPO - The Cal Poly MultiCultural Center's "Another Type of Groove: Spoken Word Poetry" will celebrate Native American Heritage Month with internationally acclaimed poet Lorna Dee Cervantes at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, in Chumash Auditorium.
A California native (Chicana-Chumash), born in The Mission in San Francisco, Cervantes is a former director of creative writing at Colorado University-Boulder, where she was a professor of English for 19 years. She is now a UC Regents Lecturer at Berkeley and she writes fiction, essays, poetry and screenplays.
Cervantes is the recipient of numerous awards, honors and fellowships, including two National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Fellowship Grants and the Lila Wallace/Readers Digest Writers Award. She wrote the Pulitzer Prize-nominated, five-volume "Drive: The First Quartet (2006)" and the forthcoming "Sueño: 30-Something of the Cruelest."


Lorna Dee ...

www.learner.org [cached]

Lorna Dee CervantesAmerican Passages - Unit 15.

...
Lorna Dee Cervantes
...
Authors: Lorna Dee Cervantes (b. 1954)
...
Lorna Dee Cervantes Activities
...
Cervantes was born in San Francisco and is of Mexican descent.Sensitive to the racial and ethnic prejudice she might encounter growing up in San Jose, her parents insisted that she speak only English both in and outside the home.She graduated from San Jose State College and for many years supported herself by writing and publishing.Cervantes founded and published a journal, Mango, which featured the work of Latino poets; she also wrote two volumes of poetry.Currently, she teaches at the University of Colorado at Boulder and is co-editor of Red Dirt, a cross-cultural poetry journal.
Both her Mexican heritage and her feminism inform Cervantes's writing.Her poetry celebrates her Mexican heritage, but it is also harshly critical of machismo and male dominance in Chicano culture and celebratory of specifically female oral traditions.She sometimes implicitly compares Euro-American dominance of Chicano people and lands with Chicano men's domination of women.Just as men and women are often at odds in her bilingual poems, English and Spanish words seem to battle on the page for space and prominence.Some poems imagine fantastical escapes from such conflict--an entirely female family, for example, or an uninhabited land.Images of birds and migration appear often in her work, particularly in her first book, Emplumada (1981), the title of which is a play on Spanish words connoting a bird's plumage and a writer's pen.In From the Cables of Genocide: Poems on Love and Hunger (1991), Cervantes uses symbols from nature to explore romantic and familial love.Her affinity for nature and landscape lend her work a unique delicacy and beauty that sometimes belie its political and social messages.


Lorna Dee Cervantes ...

www.learner.org [cached]

Lorna Dee Cervantes

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