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Wrong Lionel Barrett?

Lionel R. Barrett

President

Tennessee Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers

HQ Phone:  (615) 329-1338

Email: l***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Tennessee Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers

530 Church Street Suite 300

Nashville, Tennessee,37219

United States

Company Description

TACDL is a nonprofit organization operating under the laws of the State of Tennessee. The association provides education, training and support to the lawyers representing citizens accused of crime. The association also advocates fair and effective criminal jus...more

Background Information

Employment History

Nonlawyer Adviser

Election Commission


Affiliations

Faculty

Member


Web References(20 Total References)


Lorna S. McClusky | The Law Office of Massey McClusky McClusky & Fuchs | Memphis Tennessee

www.masseymcclusky.com [cached]

Lionel R. Barrett, Jr. Award for Outstanding Work in the Death Penalty Arena, 2001
Outstanding Service Award, Tennessee Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, 2004 Who's Who in American Colleges, 1992 - 1994 Who's Who in American Law, 2004 Who's Who in the World, 2004


| The Malefactor's Register

malefactorsregister.com [cached]

Looper's attorneys for the arraignment were Lionel Barrett, a prominent Nashville criminal defense attorney described as "an institution around the criminal courts" and Jerry Burgess, a local lawyer who had once faced off against Gibson in the district attorney election.
Barrett was an ardent death penalty foe: "No circumstances, period, would ever make me favor the death penalty," he said once. Barrett served as the president of the Tennessee Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers twice and was the first recipient of the association's award for "extraordinary effort" in defending capital murder cases. The award now bears his name. (It is appropriate to point out that Barrett's management of a Tennessee death row inmate's was heavily criticized by the American Bar Association in a 2011 Journal article. The piece blamed Barrett's lack of attention to the case as the major reason the convict could be executed. In the article Barrett agreed to the allegations made by the ABA Journal.) Gibson chose not to put farm hand Wesley Rex on the stand because his background as a special education student could have provided Barrett with grounds to challenge his competency. After Looper was returned to the jail, Barrett tried to downplay the effect Joe Bond had on his case.


Gambeson Media Network - Nonfiction - True Crime - When a Devil Drives Us

www.gambeson.com [cached]

Looper's attorneys for the arraignment were Lionel Barrett, a prominent Nashville criminal defense attorney described as "an institution around the criminal courts" and Jerry Burgess, a local lawyer who had once faced off against Gibson in the district attorney election. Barrett, 57, was the kind of attorney who went beyond the call of duty for many of his clients regardless of how much they could pay.He was an ardent death penalty foe: "No circumstances, period, would ever make me favor the death penalty," he said once.Barrett served as the president of the Tennessee Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers twice and was the first recipient of the association's award for "extraordinary effort" in defending capital murder cases.The award now bears Barrett's name. A Vietnam veteran, Barrett had served briefly in the Army's Judge Advocate's bureau, but when he returned to Nashville following his four-year military stint, Barrett found his most rewarding work as a defense attorney.In addition to the Looper case, Barrett handled some of Tennessee's most high-profile criminal and civil cases, including one of a Pentecostal minister who decapitated a parishioner and then set fire to the church to cover up the crime, and a young girl who protested the state's mandatory moment of silence at the start of school.Looper appeared confident – he was confident, according to Barrett – and smiled at his family which was in attendance in the packed courtroom.After the arraignment, Barrett and Burgess met with reporters who were scrambling for story material."I think any person in political life is confident he will win," Barrett said in response to a question about Looper's hopes for election despite Republican pleas that voters not support him."All politicians are optimistic – Vanderbilt football fans are optimistic – but right now the issue is not the election.The issue is that we have entered a not guilty plea."Barrett discounted using an insanity defense, saying Looper was well-educated and understood the situation he found himself in.An insanity claim would require the defense to prove that the defendant did not know the ramifications of his action.Unlike a standard defense position, the burden of proving insanity falls on the defense.Others who were not current Looper supporters also dismissed an insanity plea.In addition to lawyers Barrett and Burgess, Looper retained attorney Luis Rivera, a friend from Puerto Rico.Barrett, on cross-examination, questioned Bond's motive for testifying."Have any promises been made to you by them?"Barrett asked, indicating the state.The attorney was playing off the fact that Bond was afraid of being considered what he termed "an accessory before the fact or after the fact," because he had heard Looper talk at length about killing Burks, both before the slaying and then after."I'm here of my own free will," Bond said."Whatever happens to me is irrelevant.It's the right thing to do."Barrett, Burgess and Rivera could literally sit at their table and never question a prosecution witness or introduce a piece of evidence.So when Barrett attempted to call Wesley Rex to the stand, prosecutor Bill Gibson objected.Barrett just wants to put Wesley Rex up there and go fishing."Barrett wanted to introduce into the case the composite which, while it did match Looper in a general way, could have represented any number of men in Cumberland County that morning.After Looper was returned to the jail, Barrett tried to downplay the effect Joe Bond had on his case.As for the ouster suits, letters between Looper and Lionel Barrett written in January reveal Looper's dissatisfaction with Barrett's representation.Looper asked Barrett to contact the judges in the cases to ask for continuances. Looper then told Barrett to send all material related to the civil cases to Jerry Burgess.A week later, Barrett filed a motion to be excused from Looper's cases.The Chancery Court granted Barrett's motion and he reported that he was sending all of his material to Burgess.Jerry Burgess, however, told Barrett's office that he had not been retained by Looper in the ouster cases and that he was not going to represent Byron."He has made it clear to me and to Mr. Looper that he does not represent Mr. Looper in any of these civil cases, nor the pending criminal charges against Mr. Looper," Barrett wrote in a court affidavit.Eldridge attempted to file a stack of motions in the ouster case, saying that Looper had not known that Lionel Barrett was not representing him.Attorney Chantal Eldridge and Looper placed the blame for the failure to file a timely answer squarely on the shoulders of Lionel Barrett. "Mr. Looper was growing frustrated with Mr. Barrett because he was not communicating with the defendant or sending him any documentation in the cases for which he was employed," Eldridge said.Once again, Lionel Barrett was blamed for the delay.


Johnson, Scruggs & Barfield

www.jsblaw.com [cached]

I left government practice in 1988 and went to work with noted criminal defense attorneys Lionel Barrett and Rich McGee.
Lionel Barrett and Rich McGee, Criminal Defense Attorneys


columbiadailyherald.com

In this Nov., 23, 1998, photo, Byron Looper talks to his attorney Lionel Barrett in court during Looper's murder trial in Crossvile.


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