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Wrong Linda Tamura?

Linda Tamura

Professor of Education Emerita

Willamette University

HQ Phone:  (503) 370-6300

Email: l***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Willamette University

900 State St.

Salem, Oregon,97301

United States

Company Description

The Oregon Writing Project at Willamette supports excellence in the teaching of writing at all educational levels and subjects through collaboration, education, and community involvement. As a National Writing Project site, we are dedicated to improving the te... more

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Web References(36 Total References)


Staff

oregonencyclopedia.org [cached]

Linda Tamura
Willamette University


Events | Conference2013

www.janm.org [cached]

Linda Tamura, Ed.D., Professor of Education, Willamette University
Linda Tamura, Ed.D., Professor of Education, Willamette University


www.miwsr.com

By Linda Tamura
Linda Tamura (Willamette Univ.) begins Nisei Soldiers Break Their Silence with this symbolic example of the often tense relations between the white and Japanese American communities in the area. Investigating the history of Nisei soldiers before, during, and after the war, she finds that they were determined to show their loyalty to the United States despite the suspicions and mistreatment they endured in the wider community. Tamura, a member of a long established Japanese American family in the area, has previously published a history of first-generation Japanese American settlers (Issei) in the Hood River area, about sixty miles east of Portland on the Columbia River.[1] By World War II, this was the largest such community in Oregon outside of Portland; its five hundred members, of course, paled in comparison to the populations of Japanese Americans in Los Angeles and Seattle. Tamura reports "the untold journey of … largely unheralded veterans. Embedded in a past in which fear, mistrust and sheer economics overtook a community's ethics and commitment to civil rights, it … raises questions about parallel challenges we face today as well as the actions we should take to resolve them" (xx). Tamura begins by sketching the lives of Japanese Americans in the Hood River area and in the country at large in the decades before the Second World War. Tamura vividly illustrates the dedication of the Nisei to proving their allegiance as American citizens, their stoic endurance of difficult conditions, and their perseverance in the face of unfair treatment. Linda Tamura has made a valuable contribution to that process. The author draws heavily on over a hundred interviews with Nisei veterans, their family members, and others from the Hood River community. Because of her personal connections with the Nisei, Tamura enjoyed more immediate access to their stories than any outside researcher might have. Besides interviews, she relies on veterans' records, newspaper stories, various government reports, and a wide range of secondary literature on the Japanese American experience. Linda Tamura's clearly written, discerning, and engaging book deserves careful study by both specialists and general readers interested in Japanese Americans' contributions during and after the Second World War.


oregonencyclopedia.org

Linda Tamura is one of three editors-in-chief of The Oregon Encyclopedia and is professor of education emerita at Willamette University.
A third-generation Japanese American, she grew up on her parents' apple and pear orchard in Hood River. Tamura is the author of The Hood River Issei: An Oral History of Japanese Settlers in Oregon's Hood River Valley (University of Illinois Press, 1993) and Nisei Soldiers Break Their Silence: Coming Home to Hood River (University of Washington Press, 2011). Her most recent article received the John McClelland Award at the Washington State Historical Society.


www.gorgediscovery.org

This is a panel discussion with speakers Dr. Linda Tamura, Dr. William Lang, and Dr. Carl Abbott.
Questions about her family heritage led Linda Tamura, author and Professor of Education Emerita at Willamette University, to write about Japanese Americans during World War II and how her community responded. This is a panel discussion with speakers Dr. Linda Tamura, Dr. William Lang, and Dr. Carl Abbott. This is a panel discussion with speakers Dr. Linda Tamura, Dr. William Lang, and Dr. Carl Abbott.


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