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Wrong Leslie Kouba?

Leslie C. Kouba

Dean

The Minnesota Waterfowl Association Inc

HQ Phone:  (952) 767-0320

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

The Minnesota Waterfowl Association Inc

901 First St. North

Hopkins, Minnesota,55343

United States

Company Description

The Minnesota Waterfowl Association is dedicated to the preservation, protection and enhancement of our state's wetlands and related waterfowl habitat and our hunting heritage. In order to achieve our mission the following goals have been set. 1)Ensure wat...more

Background Information

Employment History

Terry Redlin Art


Kouba Sanctuary


Designer

Federal Duck Stamps


VeriSign Inc


Web References(127 Total References)


www.mnwaterfowl.com

Les Kouba
Les Kouba Leslie C. Kouba, dean of Minnesota's wildlife artists, is a self-made man who described himself as 52 percent businessman and 48 percent artist. I've made my way in this world by following three principles: First, pick the thing you like to do best; then, learn everything you can about it; and finally, be willing to work harder than anyone else in that field. Kouba's secret to success: work. It's that simple." My father, continues Kouba, contributed to my early appreciation of nature. He taught me a lot of the little tricks in hunting, trapping, and later, fishing. He instilled in me, at an early age, the sheer enjoyment of being outdoors. Kouba decided early in life that farming wasn't for him. I knew I could draw when I was about 8 years old. I think I made up my mind about then that I wanted to be an artist when I grew up. In fact, says Kouba, many of the buildings on the farm still show traces of my early enthusiastic attempts at painting. And I was quite convinced I was on the right track when I sold my first painting at age 11 to a prosperous German farmer who lived near Hutchinson. That first painting was of a deer at the water's edge with some pine trees in the background, remembers Kouba. I sold that painting for eight dollars, a king's ransom in those days" says Kouba. It doesn't seem like much by today's standards, but keep in mind that was in 1928, 'when a dime was as big as a wagon wheel.' To put it into perspective, my father's total income from his dairy business was $22 for the month. That early sale went a long way in convincing Kouba's parents that his artistic skills were worth developing. Kouba's parents supported Les's interest in art by enrolling him at age 14 in a correspondence course sponsored by the Federal Schools in Minneapolis. The name has been changed since I went there, says Kouba. It's now known as Art Instruction, the 'Draw-Me' school. It offers all the basics but it doesn't overly influence technique. You don't end up painting like your instructor. I really learned a lot from that school. I will always be thankful that I had the opportunity to take the course. Many artists I've found today, says Kouba, could benefit from some of those early lessons. Less passed away in 1998. This information was taken from Kouba's book, The Legacy of Les C. Kouba, p 11-12.


www.mnwaterfowl.com

Les Kouba
Leslie C. Kouba, dean of Minnesota's wildlife artists, is a self-made man who described himself as 52 percent businessman and 48 percent artist. I've made my way in this world by following three principles: First, pick the thing you like to do best; then, learn everything you can about it; and finally, be willing to work harder than anyone else in that field. Kouba's secret to success: work. It's that simple." My father, continues Kouba, contributed to my early appreciation of nature. He taught me a lot of the little tricks in hunting, trapping, and later, fishing. He instilled in me, at an early age, the sheer enjoyment of being outdoors. Kouba decided early in life that farming wasn't for him. I knew I could draw when I was about 8 years old. I think I made up my mind about then that I wanted to be an artist when I grew up. In fact, says Kouba, many of the buildings on the farm still show traces of my early enthusiastic attempts at painting. And I was quite convinced Iwas on the right track when I sold my first painting at age 11 to a prosperous German farmer who lived near Hutchinson. That first painting was of a deer at the water's edge with some pine trees in the background, remembers Kouba. I sold that painting for eight dollars, a king's ransom in those days" says Kouba. It doesn't seem like much by today's standards, but keep in mind that was in 1928, 'when a dime was as big as a wagon wheel.' To put it into perspective, my father's total income from his dairy business was $22 for the month. That early sale went a long way in convincing Kouba's parents that his artistic skills were worth developing. Kouba's parents supported Les's interest in art by enrolling him at age 14 in a correspondence course sponsored by the Federal Schools in Minneapolis. The name has been changed since I went there, says Kouba. It's now known as Art Instruction, the 'Draw-Me' school. It offers all the basics but it doesn't overly influence technique. You don't end up painting like your instructor. I really learned a lot from that school. I will always be thankful that I had the opportunity to take the course. Many artists I've found today, says Kouba, could benefit from some of those early lessons. ess passed away in 1998. This information was taken from Kouba's book, The Legacy of Les C. Kouba, p 11-12.


www.mnwaterfowl.com [cached]

Les Kouba
Les Kouba Leslie C. Kouba, dean of Minnesota's wildlife artists, is a self-made man who described himself as 52 percent businessman and 48 percent artist. I've made my way in this world by following three principles: First, pick the thing you like to do best; then, learn everything you can about it; and finally, be willing to work harder than anyone else in that field. Kouba's secret to success: work. It's that simple." My father, continues Kouba, contributed to my early appreciation of nature. He taught me a lot of the little tricks in hunting, trapping, and later, fishing. He instilled in me, at an early age, the sheer enjoyment of being outdoors. Kouba decided early in life that farming wasn't for him. I knew I could draw when I was about 8 years old. I think I made up my mind about then that I wanted to be an artist when I grew up. In fact, says Kouba, many of the buildings on the farm still show traces of my early enthusiastic attempts at painting. And I was quite convinced Iwas on the right track when I sold my first painting at age 11 to a prosperous German farmer who lived near Hutchinson. That first painting was of a deer at the water's edge with some pine trees in the background, remembers Kouba. I sold that painting for eight dollars, a king's ransom in those days" says Kouba. It doesn't seem like much by today's standards, but keep in mind that was in 1928, 'when a dime was as big as a wagon wheel.' To put it into perspective, my father's total income from his dairy business was $22 for the month. That early sale went a long way in convincing Kouba's parents that his artistic skills were worth developing. Kouba's parents supported Les's interest in art by enrolling him at age 14 in a correspondence course sponsored by the Federal Schools in Minneapolis. The name has been changed since I went there, says Kouba. It's now known as Art Instruction, the 'Draw-Me' school. It offers all the basics but it doesn't overly influence technique. You don't end up painting like your instructor. I really learned a lot from that school. I will always be thankful that I had the opportunity to take the course. Many artists I've found today, says Kouba, could benefit from some of those early lessons. Less passed away in 1998. This information was taken from Kouba's book, The Legacy of Les C. Kouba, p 11-12.


country-art.com [cached]

Michael Sieve, Chet Reneson & Les Kouba
Prints of dazzling landscapes, wildlife, nostalgic and Americana art take your breath away with depth of their beauty by the top popular collectible artists: Terry Redlin, Les Kouba, Dave Barnhouse ( new print in 2015 ), Michael Sieve, Mark Daehlin, Charles Wysocki, Chet Reneson, Charles Peterson and Rick Kelley. Les C. Kouba is one of the world's foremost painters of wildlife. Les Kouba Terry Redlin | Charles Wysocki | Michael Sieve | Dave Barnhouse | Chet Reneson | Les C. Kouba | Charles Peterson


country-art.com [cached]

Terry Redlin | Charles Wysocki | Michael Sieve | Dave Barnhouse | Chet Reneson | Les C. Kouba | Charles Peterson


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