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This profile was last updated on 11/8/2007 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

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Leonard Conrad

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Communications Specialist

Air Force


Radio Communications Specialist


Web References(2 Total References)


www.weeklychoice.com

Word War II veterans (l-r) Don Desautels, Lou Lenartowicz and Leonard Conrad reflect upon the days when the U.S. waged war in Europe and the Pacific.Leonard Conrad, 88, also served in the Air Force.He was trained at the radio school in Sioux Falls, South Dakota and served as a radio communications specialist in Orlando, Fla. during the war.Leonard Conrad was born in Detroit and served as a communications specialist for the Air Force in Orlando during the war.LEONARD CONRAD was born in Detroit and graduated from St. Anthony High School in 1937.He was sent to radio school after being drafted and was subsequently stationed in Orlando as a communications specialist.He was a tech sergeant."I was very fortunate not to shipped out during the war," he said."My wife Mary Ellen came down from Detroit by train and spent three years with me in Orlando.I always dreamed that I would be going but I was worried about what would happen to my wife if I did."Conrad, like most soldiers, got dribs and drabs about the progress of the war but little in the way of concrete information."You just crossed your fingers and prayed for the best," he said."You always thought of patriotism.You wanted to win the war.There was so much at stake."While some of the specific details have been lost over time, the three men remember well the feeling of elation they had when they learned the war was over."It was certainly a great feeling," Conrad said."There was a lot of patriotism back then," Conrad said.


www.weeklychoice.com

Word War II veterans (l-r) Don Desautels, Lou Lenartowicz and Leonard Conrad reflect upon the days when the U.S. waged war in Europe and the Pacific.Leonard Conrad, 88, also served in the Air Force.He was trained at the radio school in Sioux Falls, South Dakota and served as a radio communications specialist in Orlando, Fla. during the war.Leonard Conrad was born in Detroit and served as a communications specialist for the Air Force in Orlando during the war.LEONARD CONRAD was born in Detroit and graduated from St. Anthony High School in 1937.He was sent to radio school after being drafted and was subsequently stationed in Orlando as a communications specialist.He was a tech sergeant."I was very fortunate not to shipped out during the war," he said."My wife Mary Ellen came down from Detroit by train and spent three years with me in Orlando.I always dreamed that I would be going but I was worried about what would happen to my wife if I did."Conrad, like most soldiers, got dribs and drabs about the progress of the war but little in the way of concrete information."You just crossed your fingers and prayed for the best," he said."You always thought of patriotism.You wanted to win the war.There was so much at stake."While some of the specific details have been lost over time, the three men remember well the feeling of elation they had when they learned the war was over."It was certainly a great feeling," Conrad said."There was a lot of patriotism back then," Conrad said.


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