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This profile was last updated on 11/28/12  and contains information from public web pages.

Owner Inventor, Inventor

Phone: (603) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: l***@***.com
Laser-Grader
16 Peggy's Cove Rd
Alton Bay, New Hampshire 03810
United States

Company Description: Laser-Grader® Delivers Laser Grading With Precision to 1/8 of an Inch. Do you have fine grading requirements?
Background

Employment History

  • Instructor
    International Union of Operating Engineers

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Founder
    Precision Grading Company
  • Member
    U.S. Tennis Court & Track Builders Association
10 Total References
Web References
About Precision Grading Company Laser Grader - Laser Grading History of The Laser Grader
www.lasergrader.com, 28 Nov 2012 [cached]
Leo Paradis founded Precision Grading Company in 1982 providing laser grading services. He provided a specialized, high quality fine-grading service with laser graders. Specializing in fine-grading using the mini-grader © and later the improved and re-designed Laser-Grader ®.
Leo Paradis Owner Inventor Inventor of the Laser-Grader ®
Leo Paradis has extensive experience in the construction industry operating heavy equipment including bulldozers, front end loaders, cranes, and backhoes. Leo was an instructor for the International Union of Operating Engineers, Local #4, Boston, MA. where he taught classes for the union apprentices.
His background in hydraulics and welding were important aids to designing and building the first Laser-Grader ® laser grading machine. In 1992 Leo became a member of the U.S. Tennis Court & Track Builders Association. During the last 25 years, Paradis has been an owner/operator of Laser-Grading ® slab-on-grade for buildings, ice rinks, tennis courts, indoor and outdoor tracks, and athletic fields.
Our History
In 1976 the Mini-Grader © was first designed and built by Leo Paradis . Over the next few years it had many engineering and mechanical improvements.
...
In 1987, Precision Mfg. was incorporated with Leo Paradis, president, and the first sale of a Laser-Grader ® took place.
Leo ran both the manufacturing and grading service operations until October 2003 when he sold the manufacturing to P. Ronci Machine of Rhode Island .
Laser Grader Laser Grading Services
Now fully focused on his interests with Precision Grading Company, Leo provides laser grader laser grading services throughout the region.
News Story New England Construction Trade Journal - Flat Floors For Wheaton Precision Grading Company - Laser Grading Laser Grader
www.lasergrader.com, 28 Nov 2012 [cached]
Designed and patented by Leo Paradis, the grader is equipped with two laser beacon receivers and a control box mounted in front of the operator.
News Story About Laser Grader - Precision Grading Company - Laser Grading Laser Grader
www.lasergrader.com, 28 Nov 1983 [cached]
LEO PARADIS may have built the next best thing to a better mousetrap-a mini-grader that squeezes through narrow doors but does a big grader job. And although the world hasn't yet beaten a path to his doorstep, he says so many contractors are hiring his machine that he's building another one. Laser Grader Early Days The Original Article As it Appeared Laser Grader Laser Grading
Leo Paradis of Precision Grading uses his homemade mini-grader to fine-grade the gravel base for a concrete floor in a commercial building. At left is the Spectra-Physics Electronic Level which he uses to guide the grader's moldboard during the precision leveling operation.
...
Paradis built the machine right from scratch. It features an 18-hp Cushman golf cart gasoline engine which powers a Vickers six-gailon oil pump and which in turn drives the Charlin hydraulic motor -the primary mover for the entire hydraulic system. Because of the hydrostatic drive and the gearing he used, he said the 18 hp is actually boosted to 119 wheel horsepower, giving him all the power and infinite speed he needs for the job. The six lever hydraulic controls raise and lower the dozer blade, raise and lower the moldboard, move it laterally and vary the angle of the blade. The mold board itself is made from a ten-inch-diameter steel pipe, while the cutting blade is a standard manufacturer's piece. Giving him the precision and production he needs.
The SpectraPhysics ELI Electronic Level he bought from Waste, Inc. of Concord, N.H. The level provides an invisible electronic signal which is picked up by a target sensor mounted on the grader's moldboard. Set up above the grader's hydraulic controls, and wired to the target sensor, is a remote display which tells Paradis whether his blade is too high, too low, or on target for the predetermined grade. "When I first started using the minigrader," he said, "I didn't have the electronic level.
PRECISION GRADING CO.
www.lasergrader.com, 22 Feb 2006 [cached]
Leo G.R. Paradis
New England Construction Magazine Article
www.lasergrader.com, 28 April 2001 [cached]
LEO PARADIS may have built the next best thing to a better mousetrap-a mini-grader that squeezes through narrow doors but does a big grader job.And although the world hasn't yet beaten a path to his doorstep, he says so many contractors are hiring his machine that he's building another one.The machine is an articulated, hydrostatically-driven motor grader which measures a mere 11 feet long, four feet wide and four feet high, and comes with a six-foot moldboard and five-foot dozer blade.It fits through a five-feet four-inch doorway, but can fine-grade a gravel sub- grade at the rate of 25,000 sf a day with laser-assisted precision.In fact, that's what he calls his six-month-old Plaistow, NH firm-Precision Grading Company.Grading inside buildings and other tight spots is his specialty-one he saw a need for a long time ago."I've been operating heavy equipment and working in construction for twenty-two years," he said, "and I know from experience what a pain it is for contractors to have to fine-grade the gravel by hand before they pour the concrete floor."I got the idea for the machine seven years ago, and it took me almost that long to perfect it.I actually torched the thing seven times, right back down to the tires, before I got it right" He said the next one should only take him a month to build, now that he's got the design perfected.Paradis built the machine right from scratch.It features an 18-hp Cushman golf cart gasoline engine which powers a Vickers six-gailon oil pump and which in turn drives the Charlin hydraulic motor -the primary mover for the entire hydraulic system.Because of the hydrostatic drive and the gearing he used, he said the 18 hp is actually boosted to 119 wheel horsepower, giving him all the power and infinite speed he needs for the job.The sixlever hydraulic controls raise and lower the dozer blade, raise and lower the moldboard, move it laterally and vary the angle of the blade.The moldboard itself is made from a ten-inch-diameter steel pipe, while the cutting blade is a standard manufacturer's piece.Giving him the precision and production he needs, he said, is the SpectraPhysics ELI Electronic Level he bought from Waste, Inc. of Concord, N.H.The level provides an invisible electronic signal which is picked up by a target sensor mounted on the grader's moldboard.Set up above the grader's hydraulic controls, and wired to the target sensor, is a remote display which tells Paradis whether his blade is too high, too low, or on target for the predetermined grade."When I first started using the minigrader," he said, "I didn't have the electronic level.I was able to fine grade about 12,000 square feet a day."Now I can do about 25,000 square feet a day-and I can do it to within a sixteenth of an inch. "
Leo Paradis of Precision Grading uses his homemade mini-grader to fine-grade the gravel base for a concrete floor in a commercial building.At left is the Spectra-Physics Electronic Level which he uses to guide the grader's moldboard during the precision leveling operation.
The grader is so small that Leo Paradis hauls it around on the back of his pickup truck, yet he grades up to 25,000 square feet of floor slabs a day with the miniature machine he designed and built after getting the basic idea for it seven years ago.
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