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This profile was last updated on 3/19/14  and contains information from public web pages.

Dr. Lee Sappington

Wrong Dr. Lee Sappington?

Anthropologist

Phone: (800) ***-****  HQ Phone
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive
Moscow, Idaho 83844
United States

Company Description: Founded in 1889, the University of Idaho is the state's flagship higher-education institution and its principal graduate education and research university. The...   more
Background

Employment History

9 Total References
Web References
KXLY reports the bone was uncovered ...
www.columbian.com, 19 Mar 2014 [cached]
KXLY reports the bone was uncovered last week and University of Idaho anthropologist Lee Sappington visited the site Tuesday with grad students looking for larger bones or tusks.
Sappington says the bone appears to be part of the front leg of the ancient elephant-like animal.
LEE SAPPINGTON, ASSOCIATE ...
www.kxly.com, 18 Mar 2014 [cached]
LEE SAPPINGTON, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY
WITH THE UNIVERISTY OF IDAHO SAYS MAMMOTH BONES HAVE
...
"I've seen a lot of horse bones and cow bones and it's definitely bigger than that," said Dr. Lee Sappington, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Idaho.
At first glance the two pieces of first sized bone don't look like much.
"And you can tell elephants apart based on their teeth. So we're assuming it's a mammoth but we just have it," Sappington said.
But it's a good indicator of what could be buried nearby.
"Sure it made a nice crunch when they broke it. So we're going to start off trying to find a better context for it and that's going to take a while," Sappington said.
Sappington said mammoth bones have been found in almost every county in Washington.
"So just a few bones in a construction zone is interesting but it's not that interesting," Sappington said.
...
"I want people to be interested but if they disturb the site that might destroy it forever," Sappington said.
The depth where crews found the bone could help point to the animal's age; right now Sappington thinks it's part of a front leg. If a full skeleton or human tools are uncovered this could be a huge discovery, if not it could turn out to be just a few fragments of mammoth bone.
"Well you have to stay optimistic you have to stay excited because this is a real opportunity," Sappington said.
BIG News from Idaho
www.arrowheadology.com [cached]
At Kelly Creek, University of Idaho archaeologist Lee Sappington unearthed stone tools ranging from 12,000 to just a few hundred years old.
"Where we got deep, we get dates in the range of (8,000, 10,000), 11,000 years and right down to contact with the gravel where the river used to be, right around 12,000 (years)," he said.
...
Sappington said it's unique because it is remote, most of it hasn't been disturbed by past development and it is not going to be destroyed by something like a highway or a road.
Many times, development leads to archaeological discoveries and the sites are excavated quickly before the artifacts are destroyed. In this case, Sappington said what wasn't uncovered will be preserved.
"We are trying to get as much as we can out of it," he said.
At Kelly Creek, University of ...
www.durangoherald.com, 19 Aug 2012 [cached]
At Kelly Creek, University of Idaho archaeologist Lee Sappington unearthed stone tools ranging from 12,000 to just a few hundred years old.
Where we got deep, we get dates in the range of (8,000, 10,000), 11,000 years and right down to contact with the gravel where the river used to be, right around 12,000 (years), he said.
...
Sappington said its unique because it is remote, most of it hasnt been disturbed by past development and it is not going to be destroyed by something like a highway or a road.
Many times, development leads to archaeological discoveries and the sites are excavated quickly before the artifacts are destroyed. In this case, Sappington said what wasnt uncovered will be preserved.
We are trying to get as much as we can out of it, he said.
Fort Walla Walla Museum
www.fortwallawallamuseum.org, 3 Mar 2006 [cached]
Guest speaker will be Dr. Lee Sappington, Professor of Archaeology at the University of Idaho.
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