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Wrong Lee Sappington?

Lee Sappington

Search Committee Chair

University of Idaho

HQ Phone:  (208) 885-4000

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Idaho

875 Perimeter Drive

Moscow, Idaho,83844

United States

Company Description

About The University of Idaho: The University of Idaho is Idahos oldest public university and is one of only 72 land-grant research universities in the United States. From its residential campus in Moscow, UI serves the state of Idaho through educational cente...more

Web References(9 Total References)


www.columbian.com

KXLY reports the bone was uncovered last week and University of Idaho anthropologist Lee Sappington visited the site Tuesday with grad students looking for larger bones or tusks.
Sappington says the bone appears to be part of the front leg of the ancient elephant-like animal.


www.kxly.com

LEE SAPPINGTON, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY
WITH THE UNIVERISTY OF IDAHO SAYS MAMMOTH BONES HAVE "I've seen a lot of horse bones and cow bones and it's definitely bigger than that," said Dr. Lee Sappington, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Idaho. At first glance the two pieces of first sized bone don't look like much. "And you can tell elephants apart based on their teeth. So we're assuming it's a mammoth but we just have it," Sappington said. But it's a good indicator of what could be buried nearby. "Sure it made a nice crunch when they broke it. So we're going to start off trying to find a better context for it and that's going to take a while," Sappington said. Sappington said mammoth bones have been found in almost every county in Washington. "So just a few bones in a construction zone is interesting but it's not that interesting," Sappington said. "I want people to be interested but if they disturb the site that might destroy it forever," Sappington said. The depth where crews found the bone could help point to the animal's age; right now Sappington thinks it's part of a front leg. If a full skeleton or human tools are uncovered this could be a huge discovery, if not it could turn out to be just a few fragments of mammoth bone. "Well you have to stay optimistic you have to stay excited because this is a real opportunity," Sappington said.


www.arrowheadology.com [cached]

At Kelly Creek, University of Idaho archaeologist Lee Sappington unearthed stone tools ranging from 12,000 to just a few hundred years old.
"Where we got deep, we get dates in the range of (8,000, 10,000), 11,000 years and right down to contact with the gravel where the river used to be, right around 12,000 (years)," he said. Sappington said it's unique because it is remote, most of it hasn't been disturbed by past development and it is not going to be destroyed by something like a highway or a road. Many times, development leads to archaeological discoveries and the sites are excavated quickly before the artifacts are destroyed. In this case, Sappington said what wasn't uncovered will be preserved. "We are trying to get as much as we can out of it," he said.


www.durangoherald.com

At Kelly Creek, University of Idaho archaeologist Lee Sappington unearthed stone tools ranging from 12,000 to just a few hundred years old.
Where we got deep, we get dates in the range of (8,000, 10,000), 11,000 years and right down to contact with the gravel where the river used to be, right around 12,000 (years), he said. Sappington said its unique because it is remote, most of it hasnt been disturbed by past development and it is not going to be destroyed by something like a highway or a road. Many times, development leads to archaeological discoveries and the sites are excavated quickly before the artifacts are destroyed. In this case, Sappington said what wasnt uncovered will be preserved. We are trying to get as much as we can out of it, he said.


www.fortwallawallamuseum.org [cached]

Guest speaker will be Dr. Lee Sappington, Professor of Archaeology at the University of Idaho.


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