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This profile was last updated on 7/7/08  and contains information from public web pages.

Coach and Team President

Miami Heat
 
Background

Employment History

  • Coach and Team President
    Micky Arison
  • Coach and Team President
    Carnival Corp. chairman Micky Arison
Web References
Although best known for coaching four ...
www.sun-sentinel.com, 7 July 2008 [cached]
Although best known for coaching four NBA champions, including the Los Angeles Lakers in the 1980s and the Miami Heat in 2006, Riley also was a respected player both under legendary coach Adol ... Show more ,
...
Although best known for coaching four NBA champions, including the Los Angeles Lakers in the 1980s and the Miami Heat in 2006, Riley also was a respected player both under legendary coach Adolph Rupp at the University of Kentucky and then in the NBA with the San Diego Rockets, Los Angeles Lakers and Phoenix Suns, as a scrappy swingman.
...
In addition, Riley was selected in the 11th round of the 1987 National Football League draft as a wide receiver by the Dallas Cowboys but did not pursue a career in the NFL.
Outside of basketball, Riley is known for his motivational speaking, as well as several books he has authored, including "The Winner Within," a leadership guide that equates his success in sports to similar possibilities in the business world.
Riley also has been connected to several Hollywood motion pictures. He was an advisor on the movie "Glory Road", the story of the first all-black starting five to win an NCAA college basketball Division I championship. The Texas Southern team that won, beat Riley's Kentucky Wildcats in the 1966 title game. Riley's success on the basketball court positioned him for induction into the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts in September 2007. That success also led Riley to trademark the phrase "three-peat" based on his bid to win three consecutive NBA championships. The effort ended in an NBA Finals loss to the Detroit Pistons in 1989, after winning the 1987 Finals with the Los Angeles Lakers against the Boston Celtics and the 1988 NBA Finals with the Lakers against the Pistons. Riley later went on to coach the New York Knickerbockers from 1991 to 1995, advancing to the 1994 NBA Finals before losing to Hakeem Olajuwon and the Houston Rockets.
...
Later, during the 1995 offseason, Riley faxed in his resignation to Madison Square Garden and shortly thereafter agreed to work with Carnival Corp. chairman Micky Arison as coach and team president of the Miami Heat. Riley's arrival helped trigger the political impetus for the Heat's move from Miami Arena to AmericanAirlines Arena. During the process, the Heat was offered the opportunity to play in the Sunrise, Florida, arena that later would become home of the National Hockey League Florida Panthers. Riley stated he did not move to South Florida to coach in Broward County. Among the notable players Riley has coached during his two-plus decades on the sidelines have been Earvin "Magic" Johnson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Byron Scott, James Worthy, Michael Cooper, Bob McAdoo, Patrick Ewing, John Starks, Anthony Mason, Charles Oakley, Tim Hardaway, Alonzo Mourning, Dan Majerle, Shaquille O'Neal and Dwyane Wade.
Pat Riley - themorningcall.com
xml.mcall.com, 30 April 2008 [cached]
Although best known for coaching four NBA champions, including the Los Angeles Lakers in the 1980s and the Miami Heat in 2006, Riley also was a respected player both under legendary coach Adolph Rupp at the University of Kentucky and then in the NBA with the San Diego Rockets, Los Angeles Lakers and Phoenix Suns, as a scrappy swingman.
...
In addition, Riley was selected in the 11th round of the 1987 National Football League draft as a wide receiver by the Dallas Cowboys but did not pursue a career in the NFL.
Outside of basketball, Riley is known for his motivational speaking, as well as several books he has authored, including "The Winner Within," a leadership guide that equates his success in sports to similar possibilities in the business world.
Riley also has been connected to several Hollywood motion pictures.He was an advisor on the movie "Glory Road", the story of the first all-black starting five to win an NCAA college basketball Division I championship.The Texas Southern team that won, beat Riley's Kentucky Wildcats in the 1966 title game.Riley's success on the basketball court positioned him for induction into the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts in September 2007.That success also led Riley to trademark the phrase "three-peat" based on his bid to win three consecutive NBA championships.The effort ended in an NBA Finals loss to the Detroit Pistons in 1989, after winning the 1987 Finals with the Los Angeles Lakers against the Boston Celtics and the 1988 NBA Finals with the Lakers against the Pistons.Riley later went on to coach the New York Knickerbockers from 1991 to 1995, advancing to the 1994 NBA Finals before losing to Hakeem Olajuwon and the Houston Rockets.
...
Later, during the 1995 offseason, Riley faxed in his resignation to Madison Square Garden and shortly thereafter agreed to work with Carnival Corp. chairman Micky Arison as coach and team president of the Miami Heat.Riley's arrival helped trigger the political impetus for the Heat's move from Miami Arena to AmericanAirlines Arena.During the process, the Heat was offered the opportunity to play in the Sunrise, Florida, arena that later would become home of the National Hockey League Florida Panthers.Riley stated he did not move to South Florida to coach in Broward County.Among the notable players Riley has coached during his two-plus decades on the sidelines have been Earvin "Magic" Johnson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Byron Scott, James Worthy, Michael Cooper, Bob McAdoo, Patrick Ewing, John Starks, Anthony Mason, Charles Oakley, Tim Hardaway, Alonzo Mourning, Dan Majerle, Shaquille O'Neal and Dwyane Wade.
Although best known for coaching four ...
www.sun-sentinel.com, 30 April 2008 [cached]
Although best known for coaching four NBA champions, including the Los Angeles Lakers in the 1980s and the Miami Heat in 2006, Riley also was a respected player both under legendary coach Adolph Rupp at the University of Kentucky and then in the NBA with the San Diego Rockets, Los Angeles Lakers and Phoenix Suns, as a scrappy swingman.
...
In addition, Riley was selected in the 11th round of the 1987 National Football League draft as a wide receiver by the Dallas Cowboys but did not pursue a career in the NFL.
Outside of basketball, Riley is known for his motivational speaking, as well as several books he has authored, including "The Winner Within," a leadership guide that equates his success in sports to similar possibilities in the business world.
Riley also has been connected to several Hollywood motion pictures.He was an advisor on the movie "Glory Road", the story of the first all-black starting five to win an NCAA college basketball Division I championship.The Texas Southern team that won, beat Riley's Kentucky Wildcats in the 1966 title game.Riley's success on the basketball court positioned him for induction into the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts in September 2007.That success also led Riley to trademark the phrase "three-peat" based on his bid to win three consecutive NBA championships.The effort ended in an NBA Finals loss to the Detroit Pistons in 1989, after winning the 1987 Finals with the Los Angeles Lakers against the Boston Celtics and the 1988 NBA Finals with the Lakers against the Pistons.Riley later went on to coach the New York Knickerbockers from 1991 to 1995, advancing to the 1994 NBA Finals before losing to Hakeem Olajuwon and the Houston Rockets.
...
Later, during the 1995 offseason, Riley faxed in his resignation to Madison Square Garden and shortly thereafter agreed to work with Carnival Corp. chairman Micky Arison as coach and team president of the Miami Heat.Riley's arrival helped trigger the political impetus for the Heat's move from Miami Arena to AmericanAirlines Arena.During the process, the Heat was offered the opportunity to play in the Sunrise, Florida, arena that later would become home of the National Hockey League Florida Panthers.Riley stated he did not move to South Florida to coach in Broward County.Among the notable players Riley has coached during his two-plus decades on the sidelines have been Earvin "Magic" Johnson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Byron Scott, James Worthy, Michael Cooper, Bob McAdoo, Patrick Ewing, John Starks, Anthony Mason, Charles Oakley, Tim Hardaway, Alonzo Mourning, Dan Majerle, Shaquille O'Neal and Dwyane Wade.
Pat Riley - Book Keynote Speaker Pat Riley from Speak Inc for your next event!
www.speakinc.com, 14 Mar 2007 [cached]
Although best known for coaching four NBA champions, including the Los Angeles Lakers in the 1980s and the Miami Heat in 2006, Riley also was a respected player both under legendary coach Adolph Rupp at the University of Kentucky and then in the NBA with the San Diego Rockets, Los Angeles Lakers and Phoenix Suns, as a scrappy swingman.
...
In addition, Riley was selected in the 11th round of the 1987 National Football League draft as a wide receiver by the Dallas Cowboys but did not pursue a career in the NFL. Outside of basketball, Riley is known for his motivational speaking, as well as several books he has authored, including "The Winner Within," a leadership guide that equates his success in sports to similar possibilities in the business world. Riley also has been connected to several Hollywood motion pictures. He was an advisor on the movie "Glory Road", the story of the first all-black starting five to win an NCAA college basketball Division I championship. The Texas Southern team that won, beat Riley's Kentucky Wildcats in the 1966 title game. Riley's success on the basketball court positioned him for induction into the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts in September 2007. That success also led Riley to trademark the phrase "three-peat" based on his bid to win three consecutive NBA championships. The effort ended in an NBA Finals loss to the Detroit Pistons in 1989, after winning the 1987 Finals with the Los Angeles Lakers against the Boston Celtics and the 1988 NBA Finals with the Lakers against the Pistons. Riley later went on to coach the New York Knickerbockers from 1991 to 1995, advancing to the 1994 NBA Finals before losing to Hakeem Olajuwon and the Houston Rockets.
...
Later, during the 1995 offseason, Riley faxed in his resignation to Madison Square Garden and shortly thereafter agreed to work with Carnival Corp. chairman Micky Arison as coach and team president of the Miami Heat. Riley's arrival helped trigger the political impetus for the Heat's move from Miami Arena to AmericanAirlines Arena. During the process, the Heat was offered the opportunity to play in the Sunrise, Florida, arena that later would become home of the National Hockey League Florida Panthers. Riley stated he did not move to South Florida to coach in Broward County. Among the notable players Riley has coached during his two-plus decades on the sidelines have been Earvin "Magic" Johnson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Byron Scott, James Worthy, Michael Cooper, Bob McAdoo, Patrick Ewing, John Starks, Anthony Mason, Charles Oakley, Tim Hardaway, Alonzo Mourning, Dan Majerle, Shaquille O'Neal and Dwyane Wade.
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