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Wrong Lawrence Phillips?

Lawrence M. Phillips

Assistant Professor of Medicine In the Division of Cardiology

NYU

HQ Phone:  (212) 263-7300

Direct Phone: (212) ***-****direct phone

Email: l***@***.org

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

NYU

550 First Avenue

New York City, New York,10016

United States

Company Description

NYU Langone Medical Center, a world-class, patient-centered, integrated academic medical center, is one of the nation's premier centers for excellence in clinical care, biomedical research, and medical education. Located in the heart of Manhattan, NYU Langone ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Assistant Professor of Medicine In the Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, Medical Director of the Cardiology Faculty Group Practice and the Director of Nuclear Cardiology

New York University Langone Medical Center


Affiliations

American College of Physicians

Board of Governors Member


FACP District

Governor, Manhattan and Bronx Treasurer, Chapter Secretary, IMR&S Councilor-At-Large Louis Morledge, MD, FACP Councilor At-Large


IMR&S

Secretary


National Council of Physicians

Member


Manhattan/Bronx

Governor, Treasurer, Chapter


The American College of Physicians

Officio Member of the Board of Regents


ACP Services , Inc.

Board Member


Chair-elect

ACP Associate, A Cardiology Fellow


ACP

Officio Member of the Board of Regents


Education

M.D.

American College of Cardiology , San Francisco


M.D.

Division of Endocrinology

Emory University School of Medicine , Atlanta


MD FACP

New York University


medical degree

Jefferson Medical College


Web References(96 Total References)


Women - Texila Connect

www.texilaconnect.com [cached]

"Since women often present with nontypical symptoms when having a heart attack, it is very important that physicians look at younger women, too, to make sure the symptoms they are having do not represent a developing heart attack," said Dr. Lawrence Phillips, an assistant professor in the department of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City.
"One of the most important take-home points from this study is the need to have an electrocardiogram early," Phillips said.


Yoga May Cut Heart Disease Risk Factors

news.healingwell.com [cached]

"This shows that yoga does have cardiovascular benefits," said Dr. Lawrence Phillips, an assistant professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City.
But Phillips said he wouldn't go so far as to say yoga is as good as brisk walking, biking or other conventional forms of exercise that have been better studied. "And I wouldn't want people to think that yoga, or any form of exercise, takes the place of any medications they need," Phillips stressed. That said, he noted that yoga can do more than get the body moving; it's a "mind-body" practice that can also help with reducing stress and calming the nervous system. Phillips agreed that people should know what they're getting into before taking a yoga class -- especially if they have physical limitations or medical conditions. And even relatively healthy people would be wise to start at the beginning. "Make sure you're going to a beginner's class, and tell the people at the center that you're new to yoga," Phillips said. "And remember that you don't have to do everything that's offered in the class." As for cost, a class at a yoga center can run $15 to $20, or more. But, Phillips noted, as yoga grows more and more popular, lower-cost options are becoming available -- including at senior centers, hospitals and other venues. More information The American Heart Association has more on yoga and heart health. SOURCES: Paula Chu, Ph.D. student, health policy, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; Lawrence Phillips, M.D., assistant professor, medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York City; Dec. 16, 2014, European Journal of Preventive Cardiology


Annual Meeting Speaker Highlights - New York Chapter of the American College of Physicians

www.nyacp.org [cached]

Lawrence Phillips, MD, FACP, FASNC,FACC
Lawrence Phillips, MD, FACP is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, Medical Director of the Cardiology Faculty Group Practice and the Director of Nuclear Cardiology at New York University Langone Medical Center. In addition, Dr. Phillips serves as Associate Program Director of the Training Program for Cardiovascular Diseases. His clinical cardiology interests includes cardiovascular risk assessment, noninvasive cardiac imaging, valvular heart disease and coronary artery disease. Dr. Phillips has been an active member of the ACP for over 10 years having, served as the national Chair of the Council of Associates as well as a member of the National Council of Young Physicians. Dr. Phillips currently serves as the Governor for the NYACP Manhattan and the Bronx Region.


www.westpeculiarfire.org

By Lawrence Phillips, MD
Lawrence Phillips, MD, is a cardiologist at NYU Langone Medical Center in the Department of Medicine, Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology. He is also the director of the nuclear cardiology/stress lab, specializing in the care and treatment of patients with all types of heart disease.


Can shoveling snow be hazardous to your health? « fitPrescription LLC

www.fitprescriptions.com [cached]

Physically, what happens when you get really cold is you have constriction of the blood vessels," said Lawrence Phillips, a cardiologist at NYU Langone Medical Center.
"It decreases the blood supply you're getting to your vital organs. At the gym a person can step off the treadmill or lower the intensity if necessary. But shoveling snow tends to be a "goal-oriented" activity. Call it pride, stubbornness or maybe naiveté, but men especially tend to keep at it until the job is finished, said Phillips.


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