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Wrong Laurie Gesell?

Laurie Beth Gesell

Director of the Division of Hyperbaric Medicine In the Department of Emergency Medicine

UC College of Medicine

HQ Phone:  (513) 558-4553

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UC College of Medicine

3235 Eden Ave.

Cincinnati, Ohio,45267

United States

Company Description

... UC's College of Medicine is the oldest medical college west of the Alleghenies ... Copyright Information, CB) University of Cincinnati. 2600 Clifton Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 ... ... more.

Find other employees at this company (20)

Background Information

Employment History

System Medical Director, Centers for Comprehensive Hyperbaric Medicine and Wound Care

Aurora Health Care , Inc.


Member, Staff

Emergency


Medical Director

University of Cincinnati


Affiliations

Disaster Medical System

Active Member of the Disaster Medicine Assistance Team


American Red Cross

Founding Member


American College of Emergency Physicians

Fellow


Education

MD


medical degree

University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey


undergraduate degree

Skidmore College


Web References(63 Total References)


Hyperbaric Oxygenation - New strategy for attacking brain tumors

richmond-hyperbaric.com [cached]

"These patients don't have a whole lot of options," says Dr. Laurie Gesell, director of the Division of Hyperbaric Medicine in the UC's Department of Emergency Medicine, who's leading the study.
"They have a devastating disease, they have a brain tumor, which has significant morbidity associated with it," she said. "They then get treated aggressively to try to treat that horrific disease. "They end up with a complication that can have just as much significant morbidity or mortality as the disease itself." Gesell is working with University Hospital's new Brain Radionecrosis Center, the only facility in the country participating in the two-year, $450,000 study. It's funded by the National Cancer Institute, through the National Institutes of Health. Gesell explains the problem this way. When patients are diagnosed with brain tumors, typical treatment includes radiation therapy, chemotherapy or surgery. That often leads to a usually treatable brain radiation injury. Soft-tissue injury to the brain begins with swelling that sometimes disappears without treatment. So when it's first diagnosed, doctors might just watch it, Gesell says. If patients start showing clinical symptoms they're put on steroids. "If the steroids don't control the progressive injury pattern, the dose of the steroids will increase and increase and increase," Gesell says. "But there are complications and side effects from the steroids, which can be just as devastating for individuals' health," she said. Although more study needs to be done to determine how many people develop side effects from brain radiation therapy, about 200,000 people a year in the United States are diagnosed with either primary or secondary brain tumors, says Gesell. "Physicians have become more aggressive in treating these brain tumors in order to get better outcomes for their patients," Gesell says. "That also means that the incidence of problems and complications from the radiation has also increased." Knowing that hyperbaric oxygen treatment is the standard of care for conditions such as carbon monoxide poisoning, hard-to-heal wounds, crush injuries, decompression sickness and a host of other conditions, doctors at University began using hyperbaric treatments on the patients with the conciliation -- known as brain radionecrosis -- about six years ago. The treatment involves placing the patient in a pressure chamber and having the patient breathe pure oxygen at a pressure similar to being under 33 to 66 feet of seawater, Gesell says. Each treatment lasts 1½ hours. Treatments are repeated every day for one to three months. Preliminary results are promising, Gesell says. In many patients damaged tissues have been healed completely. In about 86 percent of cases, doctors were able to stabilize or decrease the steroids dosage. In some cases, patients even were able to stop taking steroids. MRIs showed that the disease had stabilized or improved in 78 percent of patients, Gesell says. Armed with the results, doctors applied for the funding for the current study. Doctors believe the pure oxygen at increased pressure causes new blood vessels to grow in injured tissue, but no one is sure exactly how, says Gesell. Gesell and her team of researchers at UC and the Neuroscience Institute set up the Brain Radionecrosis Center to study not only how well hyperbaric oxygen therapy works, but also the mechanism that enables it to work. The initial study, known as a pilot trial, will involve only 30 patients, but researchers have already been receiving calls from all over the nation, Gesell says.


Hyperbaric Oxygenation - New strategy for attacking brain tumors

www.richmond-hyperbaric.com [cached]

"These patients don't have a whole lot of options," says Dr. Laurie Gesell, director of the Division of Hyperbaric Medicine in the UC's Department of Emergency Medicine, who's leading the study.
"They have a devastating disease, they have a brain tumor, which has significant morbidity associated with it," she said. "They then get treated aggressively to try to treat that horrific disease. "They end up with a complication that can have just as much significant morbidity or mortality as the disease itself." Gesell is working with University Hospital's new Brain Radionecrosis Center, the only facility in the country participating in the two-year, $450,000 study. It's funded by the National Cancer Institute, through the National Institutes of Health. Gesell explains the problem this way. When patients are diagnosed with brain tumors, typical treatment includes radiation therapy, chemotherapy or surgery. That often leads to a usually treatable brain radiation injury. Soft-tissue injury to the brain begins with swelling that sometimes disappears without treatment. So when it's first diagnosed, doctors might just watch it, Gesell says. If patients start showing clinical symptoms they're put on steroids. "If the steroids don't control the progressive injury pattern, the dose of the steroids will increase and increase and increase," Gesell says. "But there are complications and side effects from the steroids, which can be just as devastating for individuals' health," she said. Although more study needs to be done to determine how many people develop side effects from brain radiation therapy, about 200,000 people a year in the United States are diagnosed with either primary or secondary brain tumors, says Gesell. "Physicians have become more aggressive in treating these brain tumors in order to get better outcomes for their patients," Gesell says. "That also means that the incidence of problems and complications from the radiation has also increased." Knowing that hyperbaric oxygen treatment is the standard of care for conditions such as carbon monoxide poisoning, hard-to-heal wounds, crush injuries, decompression sickness and a host of other conditions, doctors at University began using hyperbaric treatments on the patients with the conciliation -- known as brain radionecrosis -- about six years ago. The treatment involves placing the patient in a pressure chamber and having the patient breathe pure oxygen at a pressure similar to being under 33 to 66 feet of seawater, Gesell says. Each treatment lasts 1½ hours. Treatments are repeated every day for one to three months. Preliminary results are promising, Gesell says. In many patients damaged tissues have been healed completely. In about 86 percent of cases, doctors were able to stabilize or decrease the steroids dosage. In some cases, patients even were able to stop taking steroids. MRIs showed that the disease had stabilized or improved in 78 percent of patients, Gesell says. Armed with the results, doctors applied for the funding for the current study. Doctors believe the pure oxygen at increased pressure causes new blood vessels to grow in injured tissue, but no one is sure exactly how, says Gesell. Gesell and her team of researchers at UC and the Neuroscience Institute set up the Brain Radionecrosis Center to study not only how well hyperbaric oxygen therapy works, but also the mechanism that enables it to work. The initial study, known as a pilot trial, will involve only 30 patients, but researchers have already been receiving calls from all over the nation, Gesell says.


Rapid Recovery Hyperbarics : Introduction

www.rapidrecoveryhyperbarics.com [cached]

"These patients don't have a whole lot of options," says Dr. Laurie Gesell, director of the Division of Hyperbaric Medicine in the UC's Department of Emergency Medicine, who's leading the study.
"They have a devastating disease, they have a brain tumor, which has significant morbidity associated with it," she said. "They then get treated aggressively to try to treat that horrific disease. "They end up with a complication that can have just as much significant morbidity or mortality as the disease itself." Gesell is working with University Hospital's new Brain Radionecrosis Center, the only facility in the country participating in the two-year, $450,000 study. It's funded by the National Cancer Institute, through the National Institutes of Health. Gesell explains the problem this way. So when it's first diagnosed, doctors might just watch it, Gesell says. If patients start showing clinical symptoms, they're put on steroids. "If the steroids don't control the progressive injury pattern, the dose of the steroids will increase and increase and increase," Gesell says. "But there are complications and side effects from the steroids, which can be just as devastating for individuals' health," she said. Although more study needs to be done to determine how many people develop side effects from brain radiation therapy, about 200,000 people a year in the United States are diagnosed with either primary or secondary brain tumors, says Gesell. "Physicians have become more aggressive in treating these brain tumors in order to get better outcomes for their patients," Gesell says. "That also means that the incidence of problems and complications from the radiation has also increased." Knowing that hyperbaric oxygen treatment is the standard of care for conditions such as carbon monoxide poisoning, hard-to-heal wounds, crush injuries, decompression sickness and a host of other conditions, doctors at University began using hyperbaric treatments on the patients with the conciliation -- known as brain radionecrosis -- about six years ago. The treatment involves placing the patient in a pressure chamber and having the patient breathe pure oxygen at a pressure similar to being under 33 to 66 feet of seawater, Gesell says. Each treatment lasts 1 1/2 hours. Treatments are repeated every day for one to three months. Preliminary results are promising, Gesell says. In many patients, damaged tissues have been healed completely. In about 86 percent of cases, doctors were able to stabilize or decrease the steroids dosage. In some cases, patients even were able to stop taking steroids. MRIs showed that the disease had stabilized or improved in 78 percent of patients, Gesell says. Armed with the results, doctors applied for the funding for the current study. Doctors believe the pure oxygen at increased pressure causes new blood vessels to grow in injured tissue, but no one is sure exactly how, says Gesell. Gesell and her team of researchers at UC and the Neuroscience Institute set up the Brain Radionecrosis Center to study not only how well hyperbaric oxygen therapy works, but also the mechanism that enables it to work. The initial study, known as a pilot trial, will involve only 30 patients, but researchers have already been receiving calls from all over the nation, Gesell says.


NKY.Com - Kindervelt alums reminisce at lunch Sept. 28

news.nky.com [cached]

Dr. Laurie Beth Gesell, medical director of the University of Cincinnati Center for Hyperbaric Medicine, has been elected president of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society for 2007.Hyperbaric medicine involves the use of pure oxygen in a pressurized chamber to treat a variety of disorders, including problem wounds and carbon monoxide poisoning.Dr. Gesell is the only physician in Greater Cincinnati to be board-certified in hyperbaric medicine.Dr. Gesell is also an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at UC, and director of the UC Division of Hyperbaric Medicine.She received her medical degree from the University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey.She completed her residency and fellowship in toxicology and hyperbaric medicine at University Hospital.Dr. Laurie Beth GesellDr. Laurie Beth Gesell


Bizwomen: Where women in business meet to network, connect, support, learn and grow.

www.bizjournals.com [cached]

Laurie Gesell MD , Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, UC College of Medicine


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