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This profile was last updated on 10/20/15  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Larry M. Parsons

Wrong Larry M. Parsons?

Vice President and General Counse...

McLane Parkway Temple
Phone: (254) ***-****  
Email: l***@***.com
McLane Company , Inc.
4747 McLane Parkway
Temple , Texas 76503
United States

Company Description: McLane Company, Inc provides distribution services throughout the United States, delivering food and non-food products to more than 50,000 customer locations,...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Board Member
    Marywood
  • Board Member
    Austin Summer Musical for Children

Education

  • B.S.
    Texas Christian University
  • J.D.
    Vanderbilt University School of Law
32 Total References
Web References
About Us
www.marywood.org, 10 Mar 2011 [cached]
Larry Parsons
Austin Summer Musical for Children
www.summermusical.com, 17 April 2007 [cached]
Larry Parsons
...
Larry is in his sixth year as a board member and as the Fundraising Chair for Austin Summer Musical for Children.He has also been a member of the cast in five of the past six productions of the musical.
Larry holds the position of Vice President and Director of Business Conduct and Ethics for Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.Before assuming this role at Freescale, Larry was Senior Division Counsel at Motorola, Inc., and practiced labor and employment law at Fulbright & Jaworski, L.L.P and Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue, L.L.P.
Larry received his B.S. from Texas Christian University (cum laude, University Honors and Departmental Honors) and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law (Order of the Coif, Law Review).He also clerked for the Hon. Jerre S. Williams, Circuit Judge, United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.
Larry is married to Angela Dolce Parsons, a teacher at St. Michael's Academy in Austin, Texas.
Austin Summer Musical for Children
www.summermusical.com, 14 Nov 2006 [cached]
Larry Parsons -- Fundraising ChairLarry is in his sixth year as a board member and as the Fundraising Chair for Austin Summer Musical for Children.He has also been a member of the cast in five of the past six productions of the musical.
Larry holds the position of Vice President and Director of Business Conduct and Ethics for Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.Before assuming this role at Freescale, Larry was Senior Division Counsel at Motorola, Inc., and practiced labor and employment law at Fulbright & Jaworski, L.L.P and Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue, L.L.P.Larry received his B.S. from Texas Christian University (cum laude, University Honors and Departmental Honors) and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law (Order of the Coif, Law Review).He also clerked for the Hon. Jerre S. Williams, Circuit Judge, United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.
Larry is married to Angela Dolce Parsons, a teacher at St. Michael's Academy in Austin, Texas.
Freescale Semiconductor (Ethikos)
www.ethikospublication.com, 18 May 2011 [cached]
At Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Larry M. Parsons is the "triage point" for corporate ethics line reports. He decides who should or should not be investigated.
Conducting a successful ethics investigation often requires a fine balance-between not doing enough and doing too much, Parsons tells Ethikos in a recent interview. One has to avoid becoming 'paralyzed' by too much data.
Freescale Semiconductor does more than 100 investigations a year, estimates Parsons, the company's vice president, business conduct and ethics. Of these, Parsons himself conducts about 12 to 20, often the most sensitive ones.
Larry Parsons
...
Parsons had represented Motorola while practicing labor and employment law at Fulbright & Jaworski, L.L.P. When Motorola offered him a position as its labor lawyer in 1995, he also became the firm's in-house specialist with regard to ethics investigations. If an allegation arose in connection with a senior person in Motorola's phone division, say, Parsons would often conduct the investigation.
With the spin-off of the firm's Semiconductor Products Sector, Parsons faced a decision: stay with Motorola or go with the new company.
He went with Freescale and was handed responsibility for the company's ethics and compliance office, along with other areas, like labor and employment law and immigration. (The company has many H1-B employees, and has always had a big in-house immigration group.) He also oversees corporate social responsibility and investigation matters.
A process that 'works for us'
Parsons describes the company's investigations process as one that "works for us given our structure, our size, and my background [in investigations]. The function is centralized and "most investigations will go through me."
Other company units are often involved in investigations, however. If an employee relations issue has been raised, like a bad performance review, Parsons typically goes to the company's human resources (HR) team. (If the problem is with the HR office itself, the investigation will be moved somewhere else.)
If it's a loss prevention issue, a matter of "shrinkage," say, he'll usually assign the matter to security.
If the question is one of intellectual property, Parsons will draw on specialists within the company's law department. Parsons also has a lawyer working exclusively for him who does domestic employment law.
Parsons himself usually conducts investigations of senior managers, however, and "more delicate matters," as well as anything involving a government investigation. He'll decide whether or not to bring in outside counsel.
He did bring in outside counsel in connection with a recent SEC investigation into insider trading vis-a-vis Freescale's acquisition of a public company. In the end, it was determined that a "rogue" employee had traded on inside information; the corporation itself suffered no penalty.
Indeed, that investigation proved beneficial for his program, Parsons asserts, because it led them to look anew at what they were doing with training, confidentiality agreements, and some other compliance areas.)
When an inquiry came from the FBI on an export matter, by comparison, Parsons elected not to retain outside counsel. "We were not the target" of the investigation, he recounts.
First moves
When Parsons begins an investigation, he asks, "Where are the sources of information for me?
...
Above all, "I look for a story that makes sense," says Parsons.
Seeking an interview with the individual who is the 'target' of an investigation is among the last steps Parsons takes. He'll plan out interviews with others leading up to the target, always asking: Will they alert the target if he [Parsons] contacts them?
"You never go into that interview [with the target] unprepared," says Parsons.
...
Parsons was initially somewhat skeptical.
...
Parsons also scanned e-mails. Within the archives Parsons found a discussion between the supplier and employee about entertainment-i.e., entertainment that the Freescale employee might expect to enjoy during the upcoming trip. Significantly, the destination was Amsterdam, a city where the supplier had no factories or offices, suggesting a pleasure journey rather than a business trip.
Even though Parsons now began to believe that the employee had indeed solicited travel from the supplier as the supplier alleged, he still wasn't ready to confront the employee. He approached the new vendor. Had anything similar been demanded in that firm's dealings with the Freescale employee under question?
The new vendor was cooperative. After all, he wanted to keep Freescale Semiconductor as a client.
Yes, the employee had solicited travel from this firm, too.
Parsons spoke with the CEO of the new supplier. The CEO hadn't been told about the solicitation from the Freescale employee, the CEO said. "This won't happen again," the supplier vowed. Parsons explained further, "We need your help."
He requested that the supplier examine its travel and entertainment records and e-mail archives. Did the Freescale Semiconductor employee offer to reimburse the vendor for the travel he was soliciting?
He did not.
It was time to confront the 'target' employee whose position now seemed increasingly tenuous. Parsons still couldn't assume his guilt, however. All sorts of explanations might be offered; anything can happen in an investigation, after all. He wondered, "What bomb are they going to drop?"
He met with the employee. It was a long interview. The employee emphatically denied the allegations. Yes, he had made the trip, but he had paid back the vendor.
Parsons moved the discussion on to the new vendor. He recounted what he had discovered.
...
When the interview concluded, Parsons told the individual, "You should go home, and we'll be in touch.
...
Asked about 'dos and don'ts' when conducting an ethics investigation, Parsons emphasized the need to review privilege issues related to the reporting and documentation of investigation results.
Parsons notes that he is both a lawyer and the company's ethics officer. That can make for some confusion. Before each investigation, he has a conversation with the law department in which he makes clear that "my role is investigator, your role is attorney. This helps clarify things with regard to legal 'privilege.' As the investigator, Parsons may be called upon to testify in a court of law. His conversations are not protected.
He also explains this to employees. Because he has been with the company for a fairly long time, employees sometimes assume that he is there to help them through the investigatory process. That is not his role here. His role is to gather the facts.
He always makes sure that another person is in the room when he conducts interviews. That person serves as a potential witness and also takes notes while he, Parsons, concentrates on the subject. (The individual who usually accompanies him works in the company's security unit.)
...
Parsons will typically make recommendations with regard to discipline, but he is usually not the formal decision maker. (In point of fact, however, his recommendations are often accepted.)
Systemic problems are relatively rare
In the vast majority of cases (about 90 percent) the investigated misconduct is a function of "rogue employees," he notes. But in those instances where there is a systemic problem, Parsons will make suggestions regarding how systems and processes might be improved.
He makes sure to keep the company's board of directors up to date on investigations. Because of the relatively manageable size of the organization, Parsons is able to meet regularly with the legal committee of Freescale's board and provide that group with a short summary of every matter that he has investigated, flagging the most important ones (e.g., the SEC investigation). If he investigates 10 to 20 cases a year, most of them might be presented as four- to five-sentence summaries.
About 14 people report to Parsons. They include import/export experts and professionals working in the company's Environmentally Preferred Products (EPP) program, which tries to incorporate environmentally friendly materials and design features in the company's products. Only three of his direct reports are general compliance professionals. Parsons also oversees a labor employment attorney and a paralegal who focuses on training and communications, mostly. Like every department, Parsons' office has been hit by cost-cutting recently.
Ideally, he would like to have a staff of investigators, one for Latin America, say, and another for Asia. But given that the company's work force has shrunk in recent years,
Larry ...
www.complianceethicsinstitute.org, 25 Mar 2011 [cached]
Larry Parsons SCCE's Compliance & Ethics Institute
...
Larry Parsons, JD, CCEP Vice President and Chief Ethics and Compliance Officer, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Larry currently holds the position of Vice President, Business Conduct and Ethics for Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. In this role he has responsibility for all ethics, compliance, labor and employment law, immigration, corporate social responsibility and investigation matters worldwide for Freescale. Freescale is a private company headquartered in Austin, Texas with over 18,000 employees in 20 countries.
Prior to assuming this role for Freescale, Larry was Senior Director, Labor and Employment Law for Motorola, Inc. and its Semiconductor Products Sector, the predecessor to Freescale. Before joining Motorola, Larry practiced labor and employment law in the Austin office of Fulbright & Jaworski, L.L.P. and in the Dallas office of Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue, L.L.P.
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