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2011-11-21T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Laima Kott?

Prof. Laima Kott S.

Member, Department of Plant Agriculture

University of Guelph

HQ Phone: (519) 824-4120

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University of Guelph

50 Stone Road East

Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1

Canada

Company Description

The University of Guelph, Laboratory Services is a Canadian testing facility that delivers solutions to a breadth of clients throughout industry, government and academic sectors. With over 150 professionals on staff and direct access to University of Guel ... more

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Background Information

Web References (15 Total References)


"In bad infestations, you can lose ...

www.topcropmanager.com [cached]

"In bad infestations, you can lose 35 to 50 percent of your yield," notes Dr. Laima Kott of the University of Guelph, who led the team working on the canola breeding component.

...
"To put it simply, we've taken the resistant trait from a plant related to canola and we've put it into canola and made it work there," says Kott.
...
Kott outlines the next steps in the research.
...
Kott says several breeding companies are working already with the material to add weevil-resistance into their own breeding lines. She speculates it may take about two or three years for these companies to have resistant canola hybrids ready for growers.
To help speed up development of resistant lines, Kott's team is now working on identifying the molecular markers in canola DNA that are associated with weevil resistance.
...
Kott thinks these weevil-repellent effects may be due to high levels of certain glucosinolates in the resistant plants. "There are over 150 different kinds of glucosinolate compounds, and all the members of the Brassicaceae family, like cabbage, canola, mustard and broccoli, have glucosinolates, but canola has been bred to have very low levels," she explains. Her team transferred a little more of two kinds of glucosinolates from white mustard to canola; just enough to make the canola resistant to the weevil.
She says the levels of the two glucosinolates peak at two key stages.
...
Kott says, "The resistance is now built into the canola genotype. It's there from a natural source, not from a spray.


Public and private corn breeding - a behind the scenes tour February 2011 - MAGAZINE

www.ontariograinfarmer.ca [cached]

Dr. Laima Kott, a research scientist in the department of Plant Agriculture at University of Guelph, is developing Fusarium-resistant corn for livestock feed. "We're developing a novel method that entails inducing immature corn pollen grains to develop into embryos that germinate into inbred corn plants," she says. "We're also adding specific chemicals to the growth media of embryos and using UV light to create mutants, some of which may carry Fusarium resistance. Kott notes that conventional breeding done by private companies has revealed how physical factors such as pericarp thickness and husk confer Fusarium resistance. "Several private research groups are also attempting DNA marker assisted selection," she adds.


Dr. Laima Kott, a research ...

ontariograinfarmer.ca [cached]

Dr. Laima Kott, a research scientist in the department of Plant Agriculture at University of Guelph, is developing Fusarium-resistant corn for livestock feed. "We're developing a novel method that entails inducing immature corn pollen grains to develop into embryos that germinate into inbred corn plants," she says. "We're also adding specific chemicals to the growth media of embryos and using UV light to create mutants, some of which may carry Fusarium resistance. Kott notes that conventional breeding done by private companies has revealed how physical factors such as pericarp thickness and husk confer Fusarium resistance. "Several private research groups are also attempting DNA marker assisted selection," she adds.


All photos courtesy of Dr. Laima ...

www.topcropmanager.com [cached]

All photos courtesy of Dr. Laima Kott, University of Guelph.

...
It was originally developed for canola in the mid-1980s by Dr. Laima Kott, researcher and adjunct professor in the Department of Plant Agriculture at the University of Guelph. Although similar culture systems have since been established for barley and rice, corn has been notoriously difficult to manipulate in such a system. However, Kott and laboratory technician Ecaterina Simion, who have a combined total of about 50 years' experience with microspore culture, are getting close to completing a functional microspore culture system for corn after almost three years of work.
...
"We extract the pollen grains out of the anthers so they're loose, and then we get rid of the debris and put these pollen grains into liquid medium in a Petri dish, where they can start growing," says Kott. This can yield hundreds to millions of tiny pollen grains per dish.
Before the pollen grains start to grow, they are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light for a specific amount of time. This creates small mutations, called point mutations, in which only a small number of the DNA building blocks are altered. Many of these mutations will be lethal, but some will not. "Because we have a million or so pollen grains per plate, there's no problem with how much tissue we have to work with; it's totally abundant," explains Kott.
...
"So what we've done is basically killed everything that didn't have the right mutation and kept the ones that have the mutation that we prefer," says Kott.
...
Each selection agent alone kills 99 percent or more of the embryos, so they are not combined in the screening tests, says Kott.
...
"Fusarium is just one trait; there are other things we can screen for," says Kott.
...
For this reason, Hyland Seeds, Dr. Laima Kott and technician Ecaterina Simion at the Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, are also exploring microspore culture in wheat.


All photos courtesy of Dr. Laima ...

www.topcropmanager.com [cached]

All photos courtesy of Dr. Laima Kott, University of Guelph.

...
It was originally developed for canola in the mid-1980s by Dr. Laima Kott, researcher and adjunct professor in the Department of Plant Agriculture at the University of Guelph. Although similar culture systems have since been established for barley and rice, corn has been notoriously difficult to manipulate in such a system. However, Kott and laboratory technician Ecaterina Simion, who have a combined total of about 50 years' experience with microspore culture, are getting close to completing a functional microspore culture system for corn after almost three years of work.
...
"We extract the pollen grains out of the anthers so they're loose, and then we get rid of the debris and put these pollen grains into liquid medium in a Petri dish, where they can start growing," says Kott. This can yield hundreds to millions of tiny pollen grains per dish.
Before the pollen grains start to grow, they are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light for a specific amount of time. This creates small mutations, called point mutations, in which only a small number of the DNA building blocks are altered. Many of these mutations will be lethal, but some will not. "Because we have a million or so pollen grains per plate, there's no problem with how much tissue we have to work with; it's totally abundant," explains Kott.
...
"So what we've done is basically killed everything that didn't have the right mutation and kept the ones that have the mutation that we prefer," says Kott.
...
Each selection agent alone kills 99 percent or more of the embryos, so they are not combined in the screening tests, says Kott.
...
"Fusarium is just one trait; there are other things we can screen for," says Kott.
...
For this reason, Hyland Seeds, Dr. Laima Kott and technician Ecaterina Simion at the Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, are also exploring microspore culture in wheat.

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