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Wrong Khadija Rama?

Khadija O. Rama

Founder and Program Director

Tumaini Inc

HQ Phone:  +44 20 7193 4482

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Tumaini Inc

Suite 779 28 Old Brompton Road

London, Greater London,SW7 3SS

United Kingdom

Company Description

We have a Vision of a community where all people are empowered to lead healthy and dignified lives with reduced vulnerability to HIV. In 1994, in Isiolo, Kenya, a group of local women founded Pepo La Tumaini ('Wind of Hope' in Swahili) to make this vision a ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Founding Director

Mama Hope


Director

Wind of Hope


Web References(11 Total References)


Our supporters - Pepo La Tumaini Jangwani - Wind of hope in the desert

www.pepolatumaini.org [cached]

Khadija Rama, the founder and program director of Tumaini in Kenya was the guest of honor and was accompanied by Executive Director Sarah Kantharia.


Meet the African Team « Mama Hope

www.mamahope.org [cached]

Khadija O. Rama
Founding Director, Wind of Hope in the Arid, Kenya After graduating from Kericho Teacher's College, Khadija taught school in Kenya and abroad. In 1994, she began the Isiolo AIDS Awareness group to assist people living with and vulnerable to HIV/AIDS in Isiolo, Kenya. In 1997 Isiolo AIDS Awareness evolved into Pepo La Tumaini Jangwani (Wind of Hope in the Arid) and Khadija registered this community based organization with the Kenyan government as its' founder. In 2004, Khadija received the United Nations Commendation, Person of the Year in Kenya for her exemplary work with people living with HIV/AIDS. In 2007 she received the Presidential Award. Khadija also is certified as a Counselor and has degrees in both Special Education and Sociology.


Articles « Mama Hope

www.mamahope.org [cached]

Khadija, the Program Director, and a few others come and sit around us in a circle.
He opens up immediately. Khadija holds a hand to her chest as if quailing a fire, then goes on. It's not long before Khadija appears again. I've seen her this way before and I fear for whoever is in her way. She starts to gather a small posse; two men and two women. Khadija climbs out looking like she's carrying a fifty pound weight on her back. Nyla catches Khadija as she heads inside. "Did you find the thieves? she asks. "Yes, we found them. Khadija responds softly with a tone of dejection. She takes off her shoes and heads inside. _____ Around 9pm we finally get the rest of the story. Khadija is sitting on her living room couch. The dim turquoise of the solar lights cast a tiring tone on her and small shadows creep out from corners reminding us that it's night now and Mwambia has long gone home. I watch Khadija adjust her skirt again as she goes on. Her left middle finger can't bend due to the ligaments being severed during an attempt on her life. She'd caught the machete blade in her hand. She doesn't strike me as someone who is easily caught off guard. She goes on, "The man said, 'Why should we leave food when there is food there at the old man's. Khadija silences her phone and looks at her caller ID. It's Esha, the woman managing the health clinic. She was also at the home today. Khadija discards the call. "She's been calling me all night," she says, "asking me what to think. Not a week prior, a police officer was voicing this to Pepo's Director, Khadija O. Rama in front of a 14 year old boy with Aids. "Why do you help them? They have Aids and deserve to be dead already," he criticized, speaking loudly enough for everyone around to hear. Khadija takes a breath and gives us a tired smile. asked Khadija, as if she knew not only the answer to the question, but why that answer would be wrong. "I need to look forward," said Rupert, a little unsure of himself. "Yes," said Khadija. "You must serve all of them," said Khadija, calmly. Rupert returned to the ones who refused to eat. He tried again. One young boy shook his head. Rupert tried again. The boy shot his mouth up in disgust. He tried again. This time the boy got angry and made grunting noises. Rupert tried something new. This time, when he offered the platter, he did so on his knees. On my last day in Isiolo I received a final lesson from Khadija. A few days earlier we had spoken. I was feeling a lot of stress and pressure at the time, striving to fully train and prepare the two community banks before I returned home. Khadija told me not too worry so much, that I can easily "get caught up in the world. I pondered this: "Get caught up in the world"… I wasn't too sure what that meant. Then, on my last day in Isiolo, shortly after I woke up that morning, I was meditating on what she had said, reflecting on the past couple of weeks and how I had been so single-mindedly focused on my work. I realized that I was neglecting the more important duties: Saying my proper goodbyes, laughing and playing with the children, drumming with the men, sitting and chatting with the women. Basically, spending time with the people I was purporting to serve. As soon as I discovered that insight, I said my goodbyes to Khadija. "Thank you for your service," she said. "We appreciate all you have done and hope you will return someday. "But," she continued. If only the staff at one of these giant international development organizations could spend a day in the life of Khadija, or Stella, Mr. Konyango or Nassir, Yussif or anyone here at A Wind of Hope. Khadija and the staff of WOHA recently met with one of their main donors. Khadija, on the other hand, and everyone at WOHA, must face these people on a daily basis. Indeed, they are these people; One with the community. So when a policy is changed, it is Khadija that must share the news. This was the case when a major donor recently decided that they needed more accountability. Now, anyone who eats their nutritional support has to not only sign a form with each meal, but provide passport photos as well. I wonder if this organization has ever visited the people they are supporting, most of who live in mud huts without running water or electricity. How can they sign their names if they are illiterate and can't even afford pens and paper? Khadija brought this up with the elders from Malitano and they replied by saying that they would rather go without the food than deal with all of the hassle.


Kenya « Mama Hope

www.mamahope.org [cached]

Project Coordinator Khadija Rama asked Abdallah Mohamed.
Not a week prior, a police officer was voicing this to Pepo's Director, Khadija O. Rama in front of a 14 year old boy with Aids. "Why do you help them? They have Aids and deserve to be dead already," he criticized, speaking loudly enough for everyone around to hear. Khadija takes a breath and gives us a tired smile.


Isiolo, Kenya « Mama Hope

www.mamahope.org [cached]

Khadija, the Program Director, and a few others come and sit around us in a circle.
He opens up immediately. Khadija holds a hand to her chest as if quailing a fire, then goes on. It's not long before Khadija appears again. I've seen her this way before and I fear for whoever is in her way. She starts to gather a small posse; two men and two women. Khadija climbs out looking like she's carrying a fifty pound weight on her back. Nyla catches Khadija as she heads inside. "Did you find the thieves? she asks. "Yes, we found them. Khadija responds softly with a tone of dejection. She takes off her shoes and heads inside. _____ Around 9pm we finally get the rest of the story. Khadija is sitting on her living room couch. The dim turquoise of the solar lights cast a tiring tone on her and small shadows creep out from corners reminding us that it's night now and Mwambia has long gone home. I watch Khadija adjust her skirt again as she goes on. Her left middle finger can't bend due to the ligaments being severed during an attempt on her life. She'd caught the machete blade in her hand. She doesn't strike me as someone who is easily caught off guard. She goes on, "The man said, 'Why should we leave food when there is food there at the old man's. Khadija silences her phone and looks at her caller ID. It's Esha, the woman managing the health clinic. She was also at the home today. Khadija discards the call. "She's been calling me all night," she says, "asking me what to think. Project Coordinator Khadija Rama asked Abdallah Mohamed. Not a week prior, a police officer was voicing this to Pepo's Director, Khadija O. Rama in front of a 14 year old boy with Aids. "Why do you help them? They have Aids and deserve to be dead already," he criticized, speaking loudly enough for everyone around to hear. Khadija takes a breath and gives us a tired smile. asked Khadija, as if she knew not only the answer to the question, but why that answer would be wrong. "I need to look forward," said Rupert, a little unsure of himself. "Yes," said Khadija. "You must serve all of them," said Khadija, calmly. Rupert returned to the ones who refused to eat. He tried again. One young boy shook his head. Rupert tried again. The boy shot his mouth up in disgust. He tried again. This time the boy got angry and made grunting noises. Rupert tried something new. This time, when he offered the platter, he did so on his knees. On my last day in Isiolo I received a final lesson from Khadija. A few days earlier we had spoken. I was feeling a lot of stress and pressure at the time, striving to fully train and prepare the two community banks before I returned home. Khadija told me not too worry so much, that I can easily "get caught up in the world. I pondered this: "Get caught up in the world"… I wasn't too sure what that meant. Then, on my last day in Isiolo, shortly after I woke up that morning, I was meditating on what she had said, reflecting on the past couple of weeks and how I had been so single-mindedly focused on my work. I realized that I was neglecting the more important duties: Saying my proper goodbyes, laughing and playing with the children, drumming with the men, sitting and chatting with the women. Basically, spending time with the people I was purporting to serve. As soon as I discovered that insight, I said my goodbyes to Khadija. "Thank you for your service," she said. "We appreciate all you have done and hope you will return someday. "But," she continued. If only the staff at one of these giant international development organizations could spend a day in the life of Khadija, or Stella, Mr. Konyango or Nassir, Yussif or anyone here at A Wind of Hope. Khadija and the staff of WOHA recently met with one of their main donors. Khadija, on the other hand, and everyone at WOHA, must face these people on a daily basis. Indeed, they are these people; One with the community. So when a policy is changed, it is Khadija that must share the news. This was the case when a major donor recently decided that they needed more accountability. Now, anyone who eats their nutritional support has to not only sign a form with each meal, but provide passport photos as well. I wonder if this organization has ever visited the people they are supporting, most of who live in mud huts without running water or electricity. How can they sign their names if they are illiterate and can't even afford pens and paper? Khadija brought this up with the elders from Malitano and they replied by saying that they would rather go without the food than deal with all of the hassle. inspiring new friend: Khadija, the founder and director of Pepo la Khadija, propped on top of the truck, in the pouring rain, tossing cold, cement room and found Khadija leading the children in a joyous circle of song and dance.


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