Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 6/15/2017 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Kevin Grove?

Kevin L. Grove

Co-director of the Metabolic Disease Work Group

Oregon National Primate Research Center

HQ Phone:  (503) 690-5300

Email: g***@***.edu

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Oregon National Primate Research Center

505 NW 185th Avenue

Beaverton, Oregon,97006

United States

Company Description

The ONPRC is a registered research institution, inspected regularly by the United States Department of Agriculture. It operates in compliance with the Animal Welfare Act and has an assurance of regulatory compliance on file with the National Institutes of Heal...more

Background Information

Employment History

Co-director of the Metabolic Disease Work Group

Oregon Health & Science University


Senior Scientist

Oregon Health & Science University


Vice President Obesity Research

Novo Nordisk Inc


Researcher

Developmental Obesity Research Consortium


Affiliations

Contact Wellness

Scientific Advisory Board Member


National Institutes of Health

Member of the Study Section for Neuroendocrinology


American Journal of Physiology

Member of the Editorial Board


Neuroendocrinology

Member of the Editorial Board


Oregon Regional Primate Research Center

Position In Meeting Planning Committee


Education

BSc

Department of Animal Science

Washington State University


Ph.D.


PhD

Neuroscience

College of Veterinary Medicine


Web References(64 Total References)


Contact Wellness | Kevin Grove, PhD

contactwellness.org [cached]

Kevin Grove, PhD
Senior Scientist, Division of Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University Kevin Grove is a Senior Scientist in the Division of Neuroscience and the Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences and the Director of the Obese nonhuman primate resource and Co-director of the Metabolic Disease Work Group at the Oregon National Primate Research Center (ONPRC) and Oregon Health & Science University in Beaverton Oregon. Grove received his BSc in the Department of Animal Science at Washington State University in 1990, and his PhD in Neuroscience from the College of Veterinary Medicine at the same university in 1994. He did his postdoctoral work at the Institute of Clinical Research of Montreal. Grove returned to the Northwest to join the ONPRC Division of Neuroscience in 1996. In the last 10 years, Dr. Grove has been invited to speak on more than 80 occasions including at numerous prestigious conferences such as the 43rd Karolinska Institute Nobel Conference on Obesity (2004), the 10th International Congress on Obesity (2006) and the 2010 International Congress of Endocrinology, and received the 2005 Allan Epstein Investigator award from the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB). Grove was also the Community Trust Visiting Professor at Dunedin School of Medicine (University of Otago, New Zealand) in 2005. Dr. Grove has published over 90 peer reviewed manuscripts, has served as a member of the NIH study section for Neuroendocrinology, Neuroimmunology and Behavior (NNB), is a senior editor of the Journal of Neuroendocrinology and member of the Editorial Board for the journals Neuroendocrinology and the American Journal of Physiology.


whitecoatwaste.org

"We are trying to induce the couch-potato style," said Kevin L. Grove, who directs the "obese resource" at the Oregon National Primate Research Center here.
"Nonhuman primates don't lie to you," said Dr. Grove, who is a neuroscientist. "We know exactly how much they are eating." To allow monitoring of their food intake, some of the obese monkeys are kept in individual cages for months or years, which also limits their exercise. That is in contrast to most of the monkeys here who live in group indoor/outdoor cages with swings and things to climb on. While this research is not entirely new and has been the target of some animal rights' group complaints, demand for the overweight primates is growing as part of the battle against the nation's obesity epidemic, according to Dr. Grove and other researchers working with such monkeys in Florida, Texas and North Carolina, and also overseas. The monkey's daily diet consists of dried chow pellets, with about one-third of the caloriescoming from fat, similar to a typical American diet, Dr. Grove said, though the diet also contains adequate protein and nutrients. Dr. Grove and researchers at some other centers say the high- fructose corn syrup appears to accelerate the development of obesity and diabetes. For example, they point to studies in the last two years by Dr. Grove and colleagues showing that when pregnant monkeys ate the high-fat diet, their offspring had metabolic problems. Dr. Grove said he understood the protesters' view: "I applaud them for that pressure because it makes us do our job better." But he said the study found the diet induced chemical changes in the brains of fetuses that might be responsible for the problems in the offspring. But Dr. Grove said he needed the animals separated at all times so they could snack between meals, since that is an important reason people gain weight. And allowing them outside, even one at a time, would mean they would exercise more. "Our research model is a sedentary lifestyle with calorically dense diets," he said. As pharmaceutical companies move some research to less expensive countries, the obese monkeys are following. "This is a booming industry in China," said Dr. Grove.


www.keystonesymposia.org

Kevin L. Grove, Novo Nordisk and Oregon National Primate Research Center, USA
Talk Title to be Announced


www.keystonesymposia.org

Kevin L. Grove, Novo Nordisk and Oregon National Primate Research Center, USA


www.keystonesymposia.org

* Kevin L. Grove, Novo Nordisk and Oregon National Primate Research Center, USA


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory