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Wrong Kelly Siegler?

Kelly R. Siegler

Prosecutor

Harris County

HQ Phone:  (713) 274-1300

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Harris County

1001 Preston Suite 911

Houston, Texas,77002

United States

Company Description

Harris County was founded in 1836. The area was originally named Harrisburg County after John Richardson Harris, an early settler of the region. The county's name was changed to Harris County in 1839. Harris County is the nation's third most populous county ...more

Web References(198 Total References)


District Attorney Archives - Musick & Musick LLPMusick & Musick LLP

www.musicklawoffice.com [cached]

With abusive prosecutors like Ken Anderson, Charles Sebesta, and Kelly Siegler, Texas needs to step up and find accountability in a system of justice that no longer undermines public trust.
In short, David Temple was convicted of killing his wife in a totally circumstantial cold case prosecuted by Kelly Siegler, former Harris County Assistant District Attorney turned semi-celebrity on TNT's Cold Justice. Eventually, Kelly Siegler reviewed the case and obtained an indictment. When a special prosecutor (appointed by then District Attorney Pat Lykos) and District Attorney Investigator Steve Clappart started reviewing the case and the alternate suspects, BOOM, they lawyered up - with lawyers arranged by Kelly Siegler. And, Kelly sought to use influence within friendships at the District Attorney's Office and law enforcement to derail any new investigation. For over 21 years, Kelly Siegler (a Harris County Assistant District Attorney) played fast and loose with the rules. She used the courtroom as her stage for theatrics. Yes, she was aggressive, and that's ok, as long as it is fair. Just as there are bad influences in every profession, Kelly has marred the reputation of prosecutors, even those who do seek justice.


harris county Archives - Musick & Musick LLPMusick & Musick LLP

www.musicklawoffice.com [cached]

In a circumstantial case, Kelly Siegler convicted David Temple of murdering his wife.
Judge Gist concluded that Siegler withheld material Brady evidence that suggested an alternative perpetrator - and not Temple - committed the murder in this case. In short, David Temple was convicted of killing his wife in a totally circumstantial cold case prosecuted by Kelly Siegler, former Harris County Assistant District Attorney turned semi-celebrity on TNT's Cold Justice. Eventually, Kelly Siegler reviewed the case and obtained an indictment. When a special prosecutor (appointed by then District Attorney Pat Lykos) and District Attorney Investigator Steve Clappart started reviewing the case and the alternate suspects, BOOM, they lawyered up - with lawyers arranged by Kelly Siegler. And, Kelly sought to use influence within friendships at the District Attorney's Office and law enforcement to derail any new investigation. For over 21 years, Kelly Siegler (a Harris County Assistant District Attorney) played fast and loose with the rules. She used the courtroom as her stage for theatrics. Yes, she was aggressive, and that's ok, as long as it is fair. Just as there are bad influences in every profession, Kelly has marred the reputation of prosecutors, even those who do seek justice.


honor

www.hccla.org [cached]

If you've been following the David Temple story, you know that Judge Gist found veteran ex-prosecutor Kelly Siegler committed at least 36 instances of misconduct and/or hid evidence.
This is such a blatant attempt to dodge responsibility that it should, along with her statement today regarding the pending decision about prosecutorial misconduct by Ms. Siegler,* result in the consideration of a possible court of inquiry as former prosecutor Ken Anderson faced in the wake of the Michael Morton tragedy. (*Devon Anderson was quoted as saying, "Any actions such as reopening an investigation into this case would be premature.") For over 21 years, Kelly Siegler (a Harris County Assistant District Attorney) played fast and loose with the rules. She used the courtroom as her stage for theatrics. Yes, she was aggressive, and that's ok, as long as it is fair. Just as there are bad influences in every profession, Kelly has marred the reputation of prosecutors, even those who do seek justice. David Temple, the innocent man Kelly Siegler finally convicted, may finally get a new trial. Siegler, he notes, testified she didn't need to turn over the evidence because she didn't believe it was true. HCCLA in the news criticizing ex-prosecutor Kelly Siegler's conduct in the David Temple murder case (excerpts here): "Dick DeGuerin stood on the courthouse steps and told the world Kelly Siegler had finally convicted an innocent man. Prosecutors "intentionally, deliberately, or negligently failed to disclose" investigators' reports and witness statements that pointed to other suspects, but Siegler continued the suppression even following the conviction, according to the findings. Siegler testified in the habeas hearing that potential exculpatory evidence didn't need to be disclosed if prosecutors "did not believe it was true," according to the findings. Gist also wrote that Siegler influenced post-trial maneuvers by telling police and officials within the DA's Office not to disclose public records if they were requested. The findings also state that Siegler continued to pull strings even after leaving the DA's Office in 2008, after 21 years, by getting an alleged witness who approached DeGuerin after the trial to change his story. But Siegler "asked" a Harris County Sheriff's deputy - who was involved with the trial investigation - to contact Glassock and another witness "before they could be contacted by the Special Prosecutor [in the habeas investigation] or current members of the District Attorney's Office. Siegler then asked to take over the Temple case, which had been languishing for years because the original grand jury chose not to indict. "If Kelly Siegler's a lawyer in five years, I'll be shocked," Looney said.


dick deguerin

www.hccla.org [cached]

For over 21 years, Kelly Siegler (a Harris County Assistant District Attorney) played fast and loose with the rules.
She used the courtroom as her stage for theatrics. Yes, she was aggressive, and that's ok, as long as it is fair. Just as there are bad influences in every profession, Kelly has marred the reputation of prosecutors, even those who do seek justice. David Temple, the innocent man Kelly Siegler finally convicted, may finally get a new trial. Siegler, he notes, testified she didn't need to turn over the evidence because she didn't believe it was true. HCCLA in the news criticizing ex-prosecutor Kelly Siegler's conduct in the David Temple murder case (excerpts here): "Dick DeGuerin stood on the courthouse steps and told the world Kelly Siegler had finally convicted an innocent man. Prosecutors "intentionally, deliberately, or negligently failed to disclose" investigators' reports and witness statements that pointed to other suspects, but Siegler continued the suppression even following the conviction, according to the findings. Siegler testified in the habeas hearing that potential exculpatory evidence didn't need to be disclosed if prosecutors "did not believe it was true," according to the findings. Gist also wrote that Siegler influenced post-trial maneuvers by telling police and officials within the DA's Office not to disclose public records if they were requested. The findings also state that Siegler continued to pull strings even after leaving the DA's Office in 2008, after 21 years, by getting an alleged witness who approached DeGuerin after the trial to change his story. But Siegler "asked" a Harris County Sheriff's deputy - who was involved with the trial investigation - to contact Glassock and another witness "before they could be contacted by the Special Prosecutor [in the habeas investigation] or current members of the District Attorney's Office. Siegler then asked to take over the Temple case, which had been languishing for years because the original grand jury chose not to indict. "If Kelly Siegler's a lawyer in five years, I'll be shocked," Looney said.


Legal News 01/2008 (Page 2)

www.attorneyhelp.org [cached]

Kelly Siegler enters district attorney's race (Houston Chronicle)
Harris County prosecutor Kelly Siegler, known for theatrical tactics in court, plans to run for district attorney as a Republican after District Attorney Chuck Rosenthal's withdrawal. (Jan 3, 2008)


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