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This profile was last updated on 11/3/15  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Kathleen A. Deagan

Wrong Dr. Kathleen A. Deagan?

Research Curator of Archaeology

Phone: (352) ***-****  
Email: k***@***.edu
Florida Museum of Natural History
3215 Hull Road
Gainesville , Florida 32607
United States

 
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • Ph.D.
    Flagler College
  • University of Florida
118 Total References
Web References
Dana Ste. Claire, immediate past director ...
www.wuft.org, 3 Nov 2015 [cached]
Dana Ste. Claire, immediate past director of the St. Augustine 450th Commemoration, recently said that the work of preservationists Kathleen Deagan, Herschel Shepard and Susan Parker has helped to enrich the story of the nation's oldest city and first American colony.
...
Deagan, who is research curator of archaeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, recently joined Herschel Shepard, American Institute of Architects Fellow Emeritus and Susan Parker, executive director of the St. Augustine Historical Society, at the Bob Graham Center for Public Service to talk about her work.
...
Deagan said this project seemed to bring the black and white communities in St. Augustine together in a way she had not seen before.
"It actually seemed to make a difference in some real life aspect, this preservation of the past or of an idea, in a way that a lot of archaeology, a lot of strictly historic preservation projects, for me haven't," she said.
...
James Cusick moderates a panel discussion about St. Augustine preservation with (L-R) Kathleen Deagan, Herschel Shepard and Susan Parker in Pugh Hall on Oct. 28. The three spoke about the research and projects they've done regarding the preservation of St. Augustine and shared topics students can work on in the future.
...
Preservationists (L-R) Kathleen Deagan, Herschel Shepard and Susan Parker recently talked about their work in preserving St. Augustine.
...
Deagan, Shepard and Parker work to translate their research into something the public can access.
Deagan said, "In terms of history and historic preservation, I sometimes suspect that people really like their kind of mythological ideas about things or the commonly held information better than they like the results."
...
James Cusick moderates a panel discussion about St. Augustine preservation with (L-R) Kathleen Deagan, Herschel Shepard and Susan Parker in Pugh Hall on Oct. 28. The three spoke about the research and projects they've done regarding the preservation of St. Augustine and shared topics students can work on in the future.
While the leaders wrote the officials ...
staugustine.com, 6 Sept 2015 [cached]
While the leaders wrote the officials records, archaeology tells a more democratic story, said archaeologist Kathy Deagan, distinguished research curator of archaeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History. While only a few in St. Augustine's first settlement knew how to read and write, everyone lived, ate and left things behind.
Some of the earliest items found in the city have come from the Fountain of Youth Archaeological Park off Magnolia Avenue.
Menendez is believed to have landed and made his first settlement in the area, and Deagan has spent many years digging and documenting the site.
Finds from the park that date to the settlement are on display at the First Colony exhibit at Government House Museum on King Street. Deagan walked through the exhibit one recent afternoon, talking about the displays and the stories told by the pottery, buttons and beads that had been buried under St. Augustine's surface.
Some items indicate people "weren't just here to be a military conquest. ... It's really clear there was family life and domestic life," Deagan said.
During a recent interview, she pointed out a display case that holds rosary beads and one of her favorite items from the Fountain of Youth site: an amulet believed to date back to about 1565 or 1566, she said. The tiny fist-shaped "bona figa amulet" has an eye carved in the front. That type of object was used in the Mediterranean from Roman times onward to give protection to the weak against evil, Deagan said.
"It was traditionally used with babies," she said.
Finds at the site also show evidence of Native American influence in the daily lives of the Spanish settlers through pottery and cooking tools. Evidence also indicates people struggled to find enough food to survive. They even resorted to eating a type of vine, Deagan said.
Deagan is planning to uncover more of what the site has to offer. She said she wants to find more information about the native people, the Timucua.
As she went through the museum, she talked about her field and the knowledge that much more could be waiting just beneath the surface.
"There's archaeology for 10, 20 lifetimes here," Deagan said.
CoSA: City of St. Augustine, Florida
www.staugustinegovernment.com, 5 Aug 2008 [cached]
Following the landing there will be remarks by guest speaker Dr. Kathleen A. Deagan, Distinguished Research Curator of Historical Archeology for the Florida Museum of Natural History located in Gainesville, Florida. Dr. Deagan has long been associated with archeological research in St. Augustine including work at the grounds of the Mission Nombre de Dios. At the conclusion of the morning's events, Dr. Deagan will be available to sign copies of her books at the Shrine Gift Shop on the grounds of the Mission.
Following the Dr. Deagan's address, Mass will be cerebrated by a member of the clergy of the Cathedral-Basilica of Saint Augustine, the nation's first parish.
"A Mass and feast of Thanksgiving ...
www.archaeology.org [cached]
"A Mass and feast of Thanksgiving was the first thing Menendez did, and he invited all of the local native people who were so curious about them," Kathleen Deagan, distinguished research curator emerita of historical archaeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, said in a press release.
Since the early 1970s, archaeologist ...
staugustine.com, 11 Jan 2015 [cached]
Since the early 1970s, archaeologist Kathy Deagan has managed to do something that would be intimidating to some.
She entered a field that, at the time, was scarce for jobs, which was especially true for women.
Now Deagan, Ph.D., is a distinguished research curator of archaeology and adjunct professor of anthropology at the University of Florida's Florida Museum of Natural History and on Jan. 21, she'll be giving a talk at Flagler College.
Getting her hands dirty
Deagan said she was a Navy kid who moved a lot.
Deagan attended the University of Florida for her undergraduate and graduate degree. Initially, Deagan said she wasn't enrolled in the program.
"I didn't know that much about it," she said, "but it wasn't until a few classes in college that I got hooked."
The archaeologist said she was interested in the program but being that jobs in the field of archaeology were scarce, especially for women at that time, she had her reservations.
These days, she said, there's almost as many women in the field of archaeology as there are men.
For Deagan, the job offers variety because it allows for hands-on experience at the digging site and lab work experience when it comes time to process artifacts.
"You get the best of both worlds, I think," she said.
Digging in St. Augustine
Deagan's research has primarily focused on the archaeology of the Spanish colonial period in Florida and the Caribbean. She's considered to be one of the world's leading authorities on archaeological explorations of the original campsite established by St. Augustine's founder Don Pedro Menendez.
She's done digs all over the city of St. Augustine, written eight books and more than 65 scientific papers and says she's grateful the city has an archaeological program.
However, Deagan also says when she first started, typical American history was at the forefront until she and other researchers started unearthing some of St. Augustine's real history.
...
Halbirt, who's known Deagan for at least 25 years, said working with her has been a wonderful experience.
...
Although Deagan has been retired from teaching for more than 30 years, she said archaeology and research just isn't something she can give up.
"With the 450th, it's been really hard to just stop working," she said.
That being said, Deagan's keeping up with her work and giving a talk this month about the ups and downs of archaeology in relation to the discoveries at the Menendez Encampment site.
Deagan said she and her crew just kind of found the site by accident in the 1970s and they've been digging ever since.
Because that area, located at the Fountain of Youth Archaeological Park, has been flooded a lot, Deagan said it's taken a while to determine that that was the site.
She's given talks about this topic before but instead of focusing on all of the discoveries themselves, she'll talk some about her experience as an archaeologist.
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