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Wrong Kate Gerson?

Kate Gerson

Teacher of Sociology

NY Regents

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

NY Regents

Background Information

Employment History

Patch Network


Patch Media Corporation


Executive Director

New Leaders for New


Affiliations

Common Core

Senior Fellow


Regents Research Fund

Senior Fellow


New York State Education Department

Senior Fellow


EngageNY

Senior Fellow


Web References(39 Total References)


countryhomerealestate.net

In a good October 10, 2008 Ny Times post, Kathleen Gerson, a teacher of sociology at Ny University explains the feeling of well-being from having the ability to walk close to and identify your neighbors as well as shopkeepers.
Gerson stated this feeling of well-being is actually second and then having the ability to provide meals and shelter for that family.


juliasteiny.com

Speaking at the RIMA's High Expectation's Conference, keynote speaker Kate Gerson says, "The number one way we love our students is by rescuing them from struggle.
We hate and feel so uncomfortable with kids struggling." When you pose a challenge just out of a kid's reach, she's forced to think. She'll have to sort through what she already knows to come up with an educated, if not necessarily correct, answer. The kid blinks at you, deer in the headlights. You assure her she can figure it out, but the wait for her to wrestle through the problem is nerve-wracking. Often we spare her the struggle and give her the answer, which she'll never remember. Had she dug around in her prior knowledge and figured it out - or even come up with a wrong but thoughtful solution - she'd have exercised her mind. Gerson, teacher, principal and now CCSS Fellow with the NY Regents, explains that the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) encourage just this kind of challenge. They cover fewer topics, allowing time for a deeper understanding of each. (CCSS offer clearly-written one-pagers about their philosophies about math and ELA that cut through a lot of the noise generated by the media.) Gerson distinguishes between "productive struggle and toxic struggle." Gerson says, "The CCSS demand that every single student gets smarter. Gerson sees "students who know what you [the teacher] are looking for, so they know what words you want them to use. But do they actually get what's going on?" As a high school English teacher, Gerson all but danced Alice Walker's The Color Purple to convey her own passion for the book to her students. CCSS is a complicated subject; Gerson did a good job. Common Core, Common Core State Standards, Kate Gerson, TEACHING STRATEGIES, Teaching thinking


juliasteiny.com [cached]

Speaking at the RIMA’s High Expectation’s Conference, keynote speaker Kate Gerson says, “The number one way we love our students is by rescuing them from struggle. We hate and feel so uncomfortable with kids struggling.�
When you pose a challenge just out of a kid’s reach, she’s forced to think. She’ll have to sort through what she already knows to come up with an educated, if not necessarily correct, answer. The kid blinks at you, deer in the headlights. You assure her she can figure it out, but the wait for her to wrestle through the problem is nerve-wracking. Often we spare her the struggle and give her the answer, which she’ll never remember. Had she dug around in her prior knowledge and figured it out â€" or even come up with a wrong but thoughtful solution â€" she’d have exercised her mind. Gerson, teacher, principal and now CCSS Fellow with the NY Regents, explains that the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) encourage just this kind of challenge. They cover fewer topics, allowing time for a deeper understanding of each. (CCSS offer clearly-written one-pagers about their philosophies about math and ELA that cut through a lot of the noise generated by the media.) Gerson distinguishes between “productive struggle and toxic struggle.â€� Productive struggle is about thinking. By protecting kids from thinking, we accidently produce toxic struggle. She gives the example that when high schools set low standards in order to improve their graduation rates, they “send more kids to college who aren’t ready, and those kids take more remedial courses, grow debt and don’t finish.â€� The easy standards gave those students a false sense of their own mastery. Then they hit a wall. That’s toxic struggle. If they’d learned to persist at hard tasks early, they’d have a sense of self-mastery and confidence that pushing themselves will pay off. The Standards are big, broad, and now under fierce attack, even though few people know much about them, including most of their attackers. I too have my issues with certain specifics, but on the whole, they challenge American education in a healthy way. Gerson says, “The CCSS demand that every single student gets smarter. This is something they can achieve when you slow down, unpack what you’re doing, and get intentional about how it’s done.â€� Most current curricula are a mile wide and a centimeter thick. CCSS are designed to help students analyze texts so they can understand them, not merely pick out bytes of information. Ten correct facts do not add up to comprehension. Gerson sees “students who know what you [the teacher] are looking for, so they know what words you want them to use. But do they actually get what’s going on?â€� CCSS is a complicated subject; Gerson did a good job.


www.educationnews.org

Speaking at the RIMA's High Expectation's Conference, keynote speaker Kate Gerson says, "The number one way we love our students is by rescuing them from struggle.
We hate and feel so uncomfortable with kids struggling." When you pose a challenge just out of a kid's reach, she's forced to think. She'll have to sort through what she already knows to come up with an educated, if not necessarily correct, answer. The kid blinks at you, deer in the headlights. You assure her she can figure it out, but the wait for her to wrestle through the problem is nerve-wracking. Often we spare her the struggle and give her the answer, which she'll never remember. Had she dug around in her prior knowledge and figured it out - or even come up with a wrong but thoughtful solution - she'd have exercised her mind. Gerson, teacher, principal and now CCSS Fellow with the NY Regents, explains that the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) encourage just this kind of challenge. They cover fewer topics, allowing time for a deeper understanding of each. (CCSS offer clearly-written one-pagers about their philosophies about math and ELA that cut through a lot of the noise generated by the media.) Gerson distinguishes between "productive struggle and toxic struggle." Gerson says, "The CCSS demand that every single student gets smarter. Gerson sees "students who know what you [the teacher] are looking for, so they know what words you want them to use. But do they actually get what's going on?" As a high school English teacher, Gerson all but danced Alice Walker's The Color Purple to convey her own passion for the book to her students. CCSS is a complicated subject; Gerson did a good job.


scrlc.org

Keynote: Kate Gerson, Senior Fellow for Common Core and Educator Engagement for the NY State Department of Education.
This initiative is co-sponsored by Roberson Museum and Science Center, WSKG, BT BOCES, DCMO BOCES, Binghamton University, South Central Regional Library Council, The Teacher Center of Broome County, and supported by the State Education Department.


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