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2013-05-11T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Karen Taminger?

Ms. Karen Taminger M.

Materials Research Engineer At Langley Research Center

NASA

Email: k***@***.gov

NASA

Background Information

Employment History

Session Chairman

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Web References (22 Total References)


NASA 3D-Printing in Space

3dprinterhub.com [cached]

Right now all the research is being done on the ground, says Karen Taminger, materials research engineer at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. First they identify a mechanical component that that needs to be replaced or repaired, then they design the replacement part and manufacture it using a 3D printer.

"We are working towards demonstrating this capability on ISS," Taminger told SPACE.com.
...
"Just as Christopher Columbus brought tools with him to help explore the New World," Taminger explained, "NASA is developing an on-demand additive manufacturing tool that will allow space explorers to build what they want, when and where they need it."


Posts by megan | Pushing Dimensions: - Page 2

3dprinterhub.com [cached]

Right now all the research is being done on the ground, says Karen Taminger, materials research engineer at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. First they identify a mechanical component that that needs to be replaced or repaired, then they design the replacement part and manufacture it using a 3D printer.

"We are working towards demonstrating this capability on ISS," Taminger told SPACE.com.
...
"Just as Christopher Columbus brought tools with him to help explore the New World," Taminger explained, "NASA is developing an on-demand additive manufacturing tool that will allow space explorers to build what they want, when and where they need it."


Right now all the research is ...

3dprinterhub.com [cached]

Right now all the research is being done on the ground, says Karen Taminger, materials research engineer at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. First they identify a mechanical component that that needs to be replaced or repaired, then they design the replacement part and manufacture it using a 3D printer.

"We are working towards demonstrating this capability on ISS," Taminger told SPACE.com.
...
"Just as Christopher Columbus brought tools with him to help explore the New World," Taminger explained, "NASA is developing an on-demand additive manufacturing tool that will allow space explorers to build what they want, when and where they need it."


An additive process developed mainly by ...

machinedesign.com [cached]

An additive process developed mainly by NASA Langley Research Center materials engineer Karen Taminger uses an electron beam and solid wire feedstock to fabricate structures out of aerospace alloys such as aluminum and titanium... More


Karen Taminger of ...

www.airspacemag.com [cached]

Karen Taminger of NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia is working with a metal-printing technique called Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication, which she hopes to test on the International Space Station. The EBF3 method, as it's called, uses a beam of electrons to melt metal wire, like a cross between a laser gun and a soldering iron, and deposits the metal in layers. The technology is ideally suited to space because electron beams require a vacuum, and, as Taminger explains, "in space, you've got vacuum for free."

...
"This system isn't going anywhere," says Taminger. But she and her team have built a smaller version that weighs only a ton, and are working on another that's less than 100 pounds.
...
"One of the alloys we're working with is 2219, which is the aluminum alloy that the entire [station] is built out of," says Taminger. "Our goal is to have a small enough system, almost a hand-held type system, so the astronauts could go out and say 'I need a fix there' and be able to actually do a repair [on a spacewalk]. To see if the technique could help repair damage from a cosmic hailstorm, Taminger's team plans to try using EBF3 in their lab to repair aluminum panels shot through with simulated micro-meteorites.
...
Taminger thinks logistics planners could take advantage of these odds by sending up a 3D printer and enough feedstock (stored, perhaps, in an attached module) for just five percent of the station's total mass of spare parts. The astronauts would be given CAD files for all the parts that might break, and would print out only what they needed.
That strategy could be important, even essential, on a human Mars mission, where no supply ships would be coming, so the astronauts would have to pack everything with them. Taminger has done some calculations based on NASA's current Mars mission architecture.
...
Karen Taminger of NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia is working with a metal-printing technique called Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication, which she hopes to test on the International Space Station. The EBF3 method, as it's called, uses a beam of electrons to melt metal wire, like a cross between a laser gun and a soldering iron, and deposits the metal in layers. The technology is ideally suited to space because electron beams require a vacuum, and, as Taminger explains, "in space, you've got vacuum for free."
...
"This system isn't going anywhere," says Taminger. But she and her team have built a smaller version that weighs only a ton, and are working on another that's less than 100 pounds.
...
"One of the alloys we're working with is 2219, which is the aluminum alloy that the entire [station] is built out of," says Taminger. "Our goal is to have a small enough system, almost a hand-held type system, so the astronauts could go out and say 'I need a fix there' and be able to actually do a repair [on a spacewalk]. To see if the technique could help repair damage from a cosmic hailstorm, Taminger's team plans to try using EBF3 in their lab to repair aluminum panels shot through with simulated micro-meteorites.
...
Taminger thinks logistics planners could take advantage of these odds by sending up a 3D printer and enough feedstock (stored, perhaps, in an attached module) for just five percent of the station's total mass of spare parts. The astronauts would be given CAD files for all the parts that might break, and would print out only what they needed.
That strategy could be important, even essential, on a human Mars mission, where no supply ships would be coming, so the astronauts would have to pack everything with them. Taminger has done some calculations based on NASA's current Mars mission architecture.
...
Taminger says the involvement of companies like Made In Space (which counts software maker Autodesk as one of its sponsors) will bring much-needed user-friendliness to the space-based 3D printing industry. "The advantage that commercial entities have is that they've worked with a lot of external customers," she says. "They've seen a lot of different geometries, different parts being built. She acknowledges that NASA-built printers, which are run by the engineers who designed them, aren't great in the user-friendliness department.
But while Dunn and Made In Space are looking far ahead to space colonies humming with 3D printers, Taminger is busy putting one foot in front of the other.
...
"If this is actually going to be a technology that the astronauts are going to depend on for their lives, you have to have a known quality," says Taminger. Her task now is to convince NASA that such gear will be trustworthy.
Last year she got a break when an ammonia pump in the space station's cooling system failed, and had to be returned on the space shuttle. The pump had to be mounted inside the shuttle's cargo bay, and NASA engineers designed a new tool to help spacewalking astronauts secure it. Taminger used EBF3 to print part of the tool and put it through the same safety and effectiveness tests that all parts have to go through before they're cleared for spaceflight. Her part didn't actually fly on the shuttle (a conventionally produced tool did), but going through the tests showed NASA that 3D-printed parts can be just as good as their traditionally manufactured counterparts.
...
Taminger agrees that NASA has gotten more conservative, and the agency may not be willing to take a risk on a new technology, even one that could potentially transform space exploration.

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