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Wrong Karen Taminger?

Karen M. Taminger

Assistant, Structural Materials

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

HQ Phone:  (281) 483-0000

Direct Phone: (757) ***-****direct phone

Email: k***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

2101 NASA Pkwy

Houston, Texas,77058

United States

Company Description

Established in 1959, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is the US government agency responsible for the civilian space program as well as aeronautics and aerospace research. Since that time, most U.S. space exploration efforts have been l... more

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Web References(17 Total References)


machinedesign.com

An additive process developed mainly by NASA Langley Research Center materials engineer Karen Taminger uses an electron beam and solid wire feedstock to fabricate structures out of aerospace alloys such as aluminum and titanium.


machinedesign.com

An additive process developed mainly by NASA Langley Research Center materials engineer Karen Taminger uses an electron beam and solid wire feedstock to fabricate structures out of aerospace alloys such as aluminum and titanium


www.space.com

NASA has a team of researchers from four different space agency centers working on demonstrating the full concept, said Karen Taminger, materials research engineer at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.
Taminger told SPACE.com that the research is geared toward identifying a mechanical component needing to be repaired or replaced, designing the replacement part, fabricating it - with additive manufacturing - finishing and inspecting it, and working to demonstrate remote control of the additive manufacturing process. Currently, all of this work is being done in labs on the ground, at NASA's Langley, Glenn, Marshall and Johnson space centers, Taminger said, "but we are working towards demonstrating this capability on ISS." Growing support A demonstration of NASA's concept of an additive manufacturing process, Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3), was done in simulated microgravity on parabolic aircraft flights back in 2007. "We're now pursuing hardware and procedural changes to make the system more robust and astronaut-friendly," Taminger said. Similarly, an enterprising team from Singularity University, a non-profit institution in California's Silicon Valley that works on forward-thinking technologies, has formed a "Made in Space" company, carrying out parabolic flights last year to showcase their 3D printing initiative. With the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation, there has been increased national focus on 3D printing and additive manufacturing in the past six months, Taminger said. "In addition to helping create manufacturing jobs in the United States, we are pushing to demonstrate this on the ISS, in preparation for longer duration space exploration." Although these experiments have yet to be funded or scheduled to go to the ISS, "that is certainly where we would like to go," Taminger added. "Just as Christopher Columbus brought tools with him to help explore the New World," Taminger concluded,"NASA is developing an on-demand additive manufacturing tool that will allow space explorers to build what they want, when and where they need it."


www.technovelgy.com [cached]

"They get up there, and all they have is time and imagination," said Karen Taminger, the materials research engineer heading the project at NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia.
(Weightless experiments with EBF3) Early "vomit comet" tests on NASA's C-9 aircraft showed that EBF3 could work well in a zero-g environment. Taminger and her team managed to build a number of parts that looked exactly the same as parts built on Earth, down to the microstructure scale. Some researchers had predicted that the method would fail to produce anything but "ball bearings," or liquid metallic spheres in zero-g. But the wire feeders successfully deposited the metal layers onto the rotating plate as usual, except for the occasional misaligned wire that would create a growing sphere on its end. The big next step for EBF3 involves going to the space station. Taminger has already gotten the device down to a "suitcase style experiment" that fits within a volume of less than eight cubic feet, but still needs funding and a possible slot aboard one of the remaining space shuttle missions.


www.startrekfans.net

"They get up there, and all they have is time and imagination," said Karen Taminger, the materials research engineer heading the project at NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia.
Taminger's project has undergone microgravity tests aboard NASA's "vomit comet" aircraft. Now she hopes to get EBF3 scheduled for launch to the International Space Station, so that space trials can commence. "It'd be nice if we could build something from nothing, but it doesn't work that way," Taminger told SPACE.com. "We can change the composition on the fly," Taminger explained. Taminger and her team managed to build a number of parts that looked exactly the same as parts built on Earth, down to the microstructure scale. Some researchers had predicted that the method would fail to produce anything but "ball bearings," or liquid metallic spheres in zero-g. But the wire feeders successfully deposited the metal layers onto the rotating plate as usual, except for the occasional misaligned wire that would create a growing sphere on its end. "We learned a lot more when things went wrong," Taminger said. Taminger has already gotten the device down to a "suitcase style experiment" that fits within a volume of less than eight cubic feet, but still needs funding and a possible slot aboard one of the remaining space shuttle missions. "If we've got a broken part, we can even repurpose that into feedstock, or can we mine new material," Taminger said. "The short term solution is that you bring along the material you need, but you don't need to bring the parts that you need." The EBF3 device probably won't churn out spare parts immediately, if it reaches the space station. But astronauts who have seen the device in action have expressed excitement over the idea of making their own tools, 21st century pioneer style. "They can build a shovel, or a clamp or a widget, or whatever they might come up with," Taminger said.


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