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This profile was last updated on 10/19/2015 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

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Wrong Karen Dørheim?

Karen Dørheim

Psychiatrist

Stavanger University Hospital

Email: k***@***.no

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Stavanger University Hospital

Background Information

Employment History

Post Doc Researcher

MoodNet, Det regionale Samarbeidsorganet, Helse Vest


Web References(16 Total References)


www.parent24.com

"Postpartum women sleep less during the early weeks following delivery than during pregnancy and other periods of reproductive age," Dr. Signe Karen Dorheim, of Stavanger University Hospital, and colleagues write in their report.
"At the same time, these women have an increased risk of depression." Dr. Dorheim's group studied 2830 women who delivered at Stavanger University Hospital between October 2005 and September 2006. The women reported that they slept an average of 6.5 hours per night. After adjusting the data for other significant depression risk factors - including previous sleep problems, being a first-time mother, not exclusively breast-feeding, having a young infant or having a male infant, and stressful life events - poor sleep was still associated with depression. "Tiredness after delivery may be attributed to lack of sleep, but the reduced daytime energy could also be caused by depression," Dorheim told Reuters Health. "Women with postpartum depression may also benefit from treatment of sleep problems," she added. "Having a newborn baby affects the sleep of the whole family," Dorheim added. "However, when a mother is depressed or complaining of excessive daytime tiredness, it may be important for the partner or other close family to offer support with baby care at night time, to allow the mother a night of recovery sleep," she noted.


battlingforhealth.com [cached]

According to lead researcher of the Norwegian study Dr. Karen Dørheim, psychiatrist at Stavanger University Hospital in Norway,


www.visembryo.com

Dr Signe Dorheim
Division of Psychiatry, Stavanger University Hospital, Norway Signe K. Dorheim, Bjorn Bjorvatn, Malin Eberhard-Gran.


www.yourdays.com [cached]

A recent study authored by Signe Karen Dørheim, MD, PhD, a psychiatrist at Stavanger University Hospital in Stavanger, Norway, concluded that poor sleep is linked to postpartum depression independently of other risk factors including poor partner relationship, history of depression, depression during pregnancy, and stressful life events.


www.canada.com

"Postpartum women sleep less during the early weeks following delivery than during pregnancy and other periods of reproductive age," Dr. Signe Karen Dorheim, of Stavanger University Hospital, and colleagues write in their report.
"At the same time, these women have an increased risk of depression." Dr. Dorheim's group studied 2830 women who delivered at Stavanger University Hospital between October 2005 and September 2006. The women reported that they slept an average of 6.5 hours per night. After adjusting the data for other significant depression risk factors -- including previous sleep problems, being a first-time mother, not exclusively breast-feeding, having a young infant or having a male infant, and stressful life events -- poor sleep was still associated with depression. "Tiredness after delivery may be attributed to lack of sleep, but the reduced daytime energy could also be caused by depression," Dorheim told Reuters Health. "Women with postpartum depression may also benefit from treatment of sleep problems," she added. "Having a newborn baby affects the sleep of the whole family," Dorheim added. "However, when a mother is depressed or complaining of excessive daytime tiredness, it may be important for the partner or other close family to offer support with baby care at night time, to allow the mother a night of recovery sleep," she noted. Signe Karen Dorheim


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