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This profile was last updated on 11/25/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Julie A. Ellner

Wrong Dr. Julie A. Ellner?

Medical Director of the Bariatric...

Phone: (619) ***-****  HQ Phone
Alvarado Hospital Medical Center
6655 Alvarado Road
San Diego , California 92120
United States

Company Description: Alvarado Hospital, located at 6655 Alvarado Road, in San Diego, is a 306-bed acute care hospital that also operates the San Diego Rehabilitation Institute, which...   more
Background

Employment History

Education

  • MD FACS
  • MD
  • Hastings College
  • medical degree
    Tufts University School of Medicine
81 Total References
Web References
Dr. Julie ...
practicemanagementdaily.com, 25 Nov 2014 [cached]
Dr. Julie Ellner Ellner Bariatric
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Julie Ellner MD FACS laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery
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Changemaker: Julie Ellner, MD, FACS
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Changemaker: Julie Ellner, MD, FACS
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Julie Ellner, MD, FACS, is living the dream. Actually, she is living two dreams: helping others through life-saving bariatric surgery, and being "a surfer chick."
Those were dreams that did not come easily for the San Diego bariatric surgeon, and member of the Cooperative of American Physicians, Inc. Achieving them required going against the grain, fending for herself, hard work, skill, determination, and never letting anything stand in her way. And she gives thanks every day that she was able to make those dreams come true.
An unabashed Anglophile, Dr. Ellner has never forgotten from whence she came. Growing up in Funk, Nebraska, a two-street town, she was the only girl in a class of four from kindergarten through eighth grade. "So I learned early to be comfortable being the only female in the room," she says.
Although she loved sports, "from an early age, I wanted to get as far away from small town Nebraska as possible," she notes. She knew she wanted to be a physician, but she faced overwhelming discouragement from family and townspeople, and she had limited funds for school.
Even still, Dr. Ellner attended Hastings College on a volleyball scholarship and discovered a wider world when she participated in the school's London study-abroad program. She quickly fell in love with all things English and decided to stay. But her mother came to London and literally dragged her crying onto the plane to return home.
Because of a knee injury, Dr. Ellner lost her volleyball scholarship and had to find a new school, which turned out to be Immaculata University in Pennsylvania. She sold everything except her car to pay medical school application fees, and earned a medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston in 1993.
Dr. Ellner was not thrilled when her residency match brought her back to the Midwest to the University of Iowa; but once there, Professor Dr. Edward Mason, the first to perform gastric bypass surgery, deeply inspired her.
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Dr. Ellner discovered her second dream in learning to surf during a 30th birthday adventure to Santa Cruz.
"I caught the first wave and by the time I hit the beach, I knew where I would practice medicine."
Dr. Ellner is a solo practice bariatric surgeon at Ellner Bariatric, Inc. in San Diego. She is also medical director of the bariatric surgery program at Alvarado Hospital, and she performs surgery at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla. In 2000, she became the first woman to perform laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery.
In addition to surfing several times a week, Dr. Ellner does medical outreach work in Fiji. Each year, she takes clothing, shoes, and makeup donated by her patients to distribute to women in Fiji. She also volunteers with the Windansea Surf Club for "A Day at the Beach," which introduces surfing to children who are homeless, in foster care, or are mentally challenged.
Dr. Ellner is a frequent guest expert on local news programs and nationwide television shows such as The Doctors and 48 Hours. Media appearances are the way she educates people about obesity, although she says such appearances are still a challenge for her.
Dr. Ellner surrounds herself with all things English: history, antiques, and her Tudor cottage. She loves doing home repairs and plumbing, and she spends a lot of time working in her English garden. When she is in need of "therapy," she sneaks away to a cove with a jar of peanuts and feeds the squirrels out of her hand, like her grandmother taught her when she was a child.
Although her dual roles are the way she stays passionate about working and playing hard, she says her surfer friends are surprised when they find out she is a physician, and her medical associates are surprised when they find out she is "a surfer chick. And she feels lucky every day to be able to do both.
Feature photo: Dr. Ellner can shread. Photo credit: http://adaywithba.com
Dr. Julie ...
www.raquelrobles.com, 14 Nov 2011 [cached]
Dr. Julie Ellner
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Obesity is largely a genetic, metabolic disease, with devastating effects on adults and children, according to Dr. Julie Ellner, one of the country's leading weight loss surgeons who operates at Scripps Memorial and Alvarado Hospitals in San Diego and is the medical director of Alvarado's world-renowned Surgical Weight Loss program. Morbidly obese persons are almost 10 times more likely to die within five years if they don't undergo gastric bypass surgery than if they do, Ellner said. Morbid obesity leads to a 20-year reduction in life span, a 400 percent increase in the risk of diabetes, 75 percent increase in stroke and 70 percent increase in coronary artery disease. Obesity also is linked to many types of cancer, impaired immunity, sexual dysfunction and infertility. Major depression among morbidly obese persons has reached 89 percent.
Ellner said she's not treating a patient's size or their weight - she's treating the person's diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer, infertility, joint and back pain, and most importantly, increasing life expectancy and quality of life for people with a disease that will otherwise kill them. "Gastric bypass and banding surgery aren't about making people thin," said Ellner, an active surfer who has obesity in her family.
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We will soon see the paths cross and obesity will be the leading cause of preventable death," Ellner said. Surgery for obesity is widely popular and has become quite commonplace, with 220,000 weight loss surgeries performed in 2008, Ellner said. She said it is the most effective tool available to treat diabetes in morbidly obese patients and also relieves high blood pressure, sleep apnea, cardiac dysfunction, infertility and sexual dysfunction. It is the only treatment for obesity that has proven effective in the long term, according to the National Consensus Panel. The risk of surgery has dramatically declined over the years and is now about the same risk as having your gallbladder removed, according to Ellner. "However, surgery is only a tool, and patients need to recognize that it doesn't do the work for them. The most important decision that a patient makes is who performs their surgery. They need to do their research and be informed consumers. They need to ensure that they go to a surgeon who is going to personally teach them how to safely and successfully use their surgery. Without close guidance from their surgeon, they are likely to unintentionally misuse and damage their tool and regain weight." What really alarms Ellner is the rise in childhood obesity and the growing need for younger children to have gastric bypass or gastric banding surgery. "The reality is that for children who are 10-to-11 years old who have the obesity gene right now, we don't have a way of preventing them from becoming obese," she said. "Eventually they will likely need surgery, but at least they might not be a as sick with diabetes and hypertension if they start eating the right, healthy foods and exercising now. But what we are facing now is a group of children who are already diabetic and some of them are so obese that they are not going to live to be 22 years-old. So, doctors have to operate on these children earlier and earlier because of medical concerns, but they would make better use of the surgery if we were able to wait until they're 18 or 20 years old." Although obesity is, in many cases, genetic, there are a growing number of people - kids and adults- who are gaining significant weight due to bad habits, Ellner said. She said that about 80 percent of a person's tendency to be obese is genetic and about 20 percent of it is behavioral or environmental. That 20 percent, she said, will continue to swell. "Our diets and lifestyles have significantly changed in the last 20 years," Ellner said.
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"You have double income households working two jobs, and it's not like the '50s or '60s where mom stayed at home and put healthy meals on the table with fresh organic vegetables from the garden," said Ellner, who grew up in tiny town called Funk, Neb. "Today, mom is working just as late as dad is. Kids also have more homework these days and they are more stressed and have less time to sit down and eat a healthy meal. Meanwhile, mom is grabbing 'Pick up Sticks' or other fast or processed food just to get something on the table. People aren't eating as healthy when they're at home." Ellner suggests a high-protein, low-sugar diet for both children and adults. "Lean protein should occupy at least 50 percent of the volume of food you eat," she said.
Dr. Ellner said Melby's ...
www.alvaradohospital.com, 11 Sept 2009 [cached]
Dr. Ellner said Melby's experience underscores the necessity of continual patient education and follow up after weight-loss surgery. However, many patients do not receive this critical support.
"Melby's situation is not unusual," Dr. Ellner said.
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"Typically, gastric bypass patients fly along the first year on the strength of the surgery alone, but do not know how to use this tool," Dr. Ellner said. "They are fooled by the temporary increase in metabolism that occurs as a result of the surgery, and think weight loss will be easy for the rest of their lives. But if they do not use the first year to incorporate exercise into their lives, and learn how to make proper use of the tool to help them change eating habits, the weight will start to come back."
She added weight gain could be triggered by a life event, such as a job change or divorce, which results in less-healthy eating and exercise habits.
"The focus is no longer on taking care of themselves," Dr. Ellner said. "Their own health needs go on the back burner, and before they know it, they're regaining weight."
Dr. Ellner said another one of her gastric bypass patients recently told her how difficult it was to stick to healthy eating and exercise while her home underwent renovation. The patient, who'd had the surgery just a few months earlier, told Dr. Ellner that she had started eating "convenience foods" and stopped exercising.
"She said to me, 'When I'm working on my house all day and night, when am I supposed to exercise?'" Dr. Ellner recalled. "I answered her by saying, 'Whenever you would go to chemotherapy if you had cancer.'
"That's the way people need to prioritize their gastric bypass program," Dr. Ellner said.
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Melby had StomaphyX surgery with Dr. Ellner at Alvarado Hospital in November of 2008, and was home by that evening.
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But this time, Melby continues to follow-up regularly with Dr. Ellner.
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Melby has learned from Dr. Ellner how to use her tool and recognize the difference between 'head hunger' and genuine body hunger.
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StomaphyX may offer gastric bypass patients a second chance, but Dr. Ellner emphasized that behavioral changes are still necessary to receive the full benefit.
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"If you are a genetically obese person, obesity is always looming, ready to reinvade your life if you are not diligent-even if you've had gastric bypass surgery," said Alvarado Hospital bariatric surgeon Julie Ellner, MD.
Dr. Ellner shares the following tips for lasting weight-loss success:
Doctors
www.mipakids.org, 17 July 2014 [cached]
Julie Ellner, MD
By JULIE ELLNER, ...
www.mi-reporter.com, 1 Oct 2012 [cached]
By JULIE ELLNER, M.D. Mercer Island Reporter Contributor
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Dr. Julie Ellner is a pediatrician at Mercer Island Pediatrics.
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