Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 6/13/2017 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Julia Esquivel?

Julia Esquivel

Teacher

Loyola

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Loyola

Background Information

Employment History

Member, Staff

World Council of Churches


Affiliations

Dialogo

Founder


Education

honorary doctorate

theology

University of Berne , Switzerland


Web References(94 Total References)


Nonviolent Cow : BobsPhotosAndEssays/Buried in Guatemala browse

www.nonviolentworm.org [cached]

Julia Esquivel and 5 pilgrims
After breakfast and a few reminders (like never flush any paper, even toilet paper, down the toilet in Guatemala), our journey begins. Our first encounter is with Julia Esquivel, who comes to us at our hotel. At my first sight of her, it is clear to me that I am in the presence of a holy woman. She is elderly, wise, an accomplished poet, a political activist who spent 16 years in exile, and most of all a deeply spiritual person. Through one of our guides she asks us in Spanish to tell her a little about ourselves. We do. She, a storyteller, tells us her story by relating it to our lives. She tells of her, and the people of Guatemala's, suffering and struggles, especially during the 36-year civil war that started in 1954 when the military (with the help of the USA government) overthrew the democratically elected government of Guatemala. Over her long and eventful life she has learned that all life is a gift of God, and that to live life to the fullest we must be all we can be. She told of how she had to struggle with the anger she intensely felt toward the treatment of her people. She has learned through difficult struggles the secret of interior peace - forgiveness of ones enemy. She has learned how to pray for the leaders of her country and the USA, like President Bush, despite the suffering, torture and death they have brought into the world. She spent a lot of time in prayer with the words of Jesus on the cross: "Forgive them, for they know not what they do. (Threatened with Resurrection: Prayers and Poems from an Exiled Guatamalan, Julia Esquivel, 1982.) After another full breakfast at a neighboring restaurant, we left for Guatemala City to meet once more, near the end of the trip, with Julia Esquivel - poet, political exile, wise woman. This time it was at a Mennonite Mission. She asked us what our thoughts were about Guatemala at this point of our pilgrimage. Words we say, according to Julia, must be the words God wants us to say. Words are like seeds that when planted and nourished can grow into mighty forces bringing Gods reign down on earth. Julia Esquivel Again we were blessed with words of wisdom from this elder of society who suffered much, spent 16 years in political exile, yet was full of hope and expressed gratitude. She reminded me of another wise elderly women I had the blessing to have as my teacher at Loyola in Chicago, Sister Irene Dugen, a cenacle religious who was teaching a course on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius for the last time. When she spoke her carefully thought out words, like Julia Esquivel, you felt like they came from deep inside her. Here is a poem by Julia Esquivel that describes many persons who have hope even though they suf


www.nonviolentworm.org

Julia Esquivel and 5 pilgrims
After breakfast and a few reminders (like never flush any paper, even toilet paper, down the toilet in Guatemala), our journey begins. Our first encounter is with Julia Esquivel, who comes to us at our hotel. At my first sight of her, it is clear to me that I am in the presence of a holy woman. She is elderly, wise, an accomplished poet, a political activist who spent 16 years in exile, and most of all a deeply spiritual person. Through one of our guides she asks us in Spanish to tell her a little about ourselves. We do. She, a storyteller, tells us her story by relating it to our lives. She tells of her, and the people of Guatemala's, suffering and struggles, especially during the 36-year civil war that started in 1954 when the military (with the help of the USA government) overthrew the democratically elected government of Guatemala. Over her long and eventful life she has learned that all life is a gift of God, and that to live life to the fullest we must be all we can be. She told of how she had to struggle with the anger she intensely felt toward the treatment of her people. She has learned through difficult struggles the secret of interior peace - forgiveness of one's enemy. She has learned how to pray for the leaders of her country and the USA, like President Bush, despite the suffering, torture and death they have brought into the world. She spent a lot of time in prayer with the words of Jesus on the cross: "Forgive them, for they know not what they do. (Threatened with Resurrection: Prayers and Poems from an Exiled Guatamalan, Julia Esquivel, 1982.) After another full breakfast at a neighboring restaurant, we left for Guatemala City to meet once more, near the end of the trip, with Julia Esquivel - poet, political exile, wise woman. This time it was at a Mennonite Mission. She asked us what our thoughts were about Guatemala at this point of our pilgrimage. Words we say, according to Julia, must be the words God wants us to say. Words are like seeds that when planted and nourished can grow into mighty forces bringing God's reign down on earth. Julia Esquivel Again we were blessed with words of wisdom from this elder of society who suffered much, spent 16 years in political exile, yet was full of hope and expressed gratitude. She reminded me of another wise elderly women I had the blessing to have as my teacher at Loyola in Chicago, Sister Irene Dugen, a cenacle religious who was teaching a course on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius for the last time. When she spoke her carefully thought out words, like Julia Esquivel, you felt like they came from deep inside her. Here is a poem by Julia Esquivel that describes many persons who have hope even though they suffer repression. - Julia Esquivel in "Threatened with Resurrection, Prayers and Poems from an Exiled Guatemalan"


Milwaukee Renaissance : GrafFamily/Buried in Guatemala

milwaukeerenaissance.com [cached]

Julia Esquivel and 5 pilgrimsAfter breakfast and a few reminders (like never flush any paper, even toilet paper, down the toilet in Guatemala), our journey begins.Our first encounter is with Julia Esquivel, who comes to us at our hotel.At my first sight of her, it is clear to me that I am in the presence of a holy woman.She is elderly, wise, an accomplished poet, a political activist who spent 16 years in exile, and most of all a deeply spiritual person.Through one of our guides she asks us in Spanish to tell her a little about ourselves.We do.She, a storyteller, tells us her story by relating it to our lives. title=She tells of her, and the people of Guatemala,s, suffering and struggles, especially during the 36-year civil war that started in 1954 when the military (with the help of the USA government) overthrew the democratically elected government of Guatemala.Over her long and eventful life she has learned that all life is a gift of God, and that to live life to the fullest we must be all we can be.She told of how she had to struggle with the anger she intensely felt toward the treatment of her people.She has learned through difficult struggles the secret of interior peace - forgiveness of one's enemy.She has learned how to pray for the leaders of her country and the USA, like President Bush, despite the suffering, torture and death they have brought into the world.(Threatened with Resurrection: Prayers and Poems from an Exiled Guatamalan, Julia Esquivel, 1982.) After another full breakfast at a neighboring restaurant, we left for Guatemala City to meet once more, near the end of the trip, with Julia Esquivel - poet, political exile, wise woman.This time it was at a Mennonite Mission.She asked us what our thoughts were about Guatemala at this point of our pilgrimage.Words we say, according to Julia, must be the words God wants us to say.Words are like seeds that when planted and nourished can grow into mighty forces bringing God's reign down on earth. title=Julia EsquivelAgain we were blessed with words of wisdom from this elder of society who suffered much, spent 16 years in political exile, yet was full of hope and expressed gratitude.She reminded me of another wise elderly women I had the blessing to have as my teacher at Loyola in Chicago, Sister Irene Dugen, a cenacle religious who was teaching a course on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius for the last time.When she spoke her carefully thought out words, like Julia Esquivel, you felt like they came from deep inside her.Here is a poem by Julia Esquivel that describes many persons who have hope even though they suffer repression. , Julia Esquivel in ,Threatened with Resurrection, Prayers and Poems from an Exiled Guatemalan,


COLOMBIA WEEK: Independent News and Analysis (BIOGRAPHIES page)

www.colombiaweek.org [cached]

Her experience includes copy editing for Redleaf Press, reporting for a daily newspaper in Iowa, working for Witness for Peace in Nicaragua, Chicago and Washington, D.C., and translating two volumes by Nicaraguan poet Julia Esquivel.She has been a Colombia Week editorial consultant since January 2004.


Julia Esquivel :: Veterans of Hope

www.veteransofhope.org [cached]

Born in San Marcos, Guatemala, in 1930, Esquivel went on to study at the University of San Carlos in Guatemala, the Seminario Biblico Latinoamericano in Costa Rica, and the Ecumenical Institute of Bossey in Switzerland.
She has worked as a teacher, principal, and pastoral social worker. She is also a writer and human rights activist. As her native Guatemala endured nearly 30 years of catastrophic political violence under the rule of a series of dictators, Esquivel watched as thousands and thousands of Maya, Quichez and other indigenous groups were savagely murdered. Hundreds of villages were literally wiped off the face of the earth and the entire nation experienced a type of profound communal trauma in the face of massive and often arbitrary brutality. Where others gave up hope, or took up arms in resistance, Esquivel searched for another path toward peace. Against this bloody backdrop, Esquivel played the role of activist, poet, and minister. She stood as a witness to God's justice and compassion, and acted as a healer amidst a land of suffering. As an exile, Esquivel lived in Switzerland among the nuns of the Grand Champs monastic community for eight years. At other times she lived in Mexico and Nicaragua as well. Instead of dwelling on the difficulties of exile, Esquivel used her time as an opportunity for education, as school for her own development and as a time to heal from the pain she experienced watching so many people endure fear, torture, and death. From her base in Switzerland, she traveled throughout Europe and into the United States and Canada, speaking, organizing, and advocating on behalf of the millions suffering in the Guatemalan holocaust. She gathered her strength through time in reflection and prayer, searching for a way toward healing -- healing for her own wounds and rages, and the healing of her wounded and raging nation. She has begun to find and create that healing in her ministry of reconciliation, in her work with global solidarity movements, in her work with churches and rural communities in Guatemala, in prayer and contemplation, and in the spirit of truth and compassion that pervades her poetry. She says that her poetry was literally like oxygen for her, arising as much out of need as out of volition-the need to heal, the need to keep on living. Julia Esquivel. Julia Esquivel. Threatened with Resurrection: Prayers and Poems from an Exiled Guatemalan, Elgin: Brethren Press, 1982 Julia Esquivel. Julia Esquivel. Floreceras Guatemala, Mexico: United House Publications, 1989 Julia Esquivel. The Certainty of Spring: Poems by a Guatamalan Exile, Washington, D.C.: Ecumenical Program on Central America and the Caribbean, 1993. Julia Esquivel. Some Secrets of the Kingdom, Guatamala: SEED, 1997. Julia Esquivel. Julia Esquivel


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory