Share This Profile
Share this profile on Facebook.
Link to this profile on LinkedIn.
Tweet this profile on Twitter.
Email a link to this profile.
See other services through which you can share this profile.
This profile was last updated on 10/6/11  and contains information from public web pages.
 
Background

Employment History

  • Nurse's Aide
    Holmen High School
  • Supervisor of the Disaster Action Team
    Red Cross's Scenic Bluffs Chapter
  • Teacher
    Holmen Recreation Department

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Volunteer
    Red Cross's Scenic Bluffs Chapter
11 Total References
Web References
Like thousands of other Americans, ...
seekerdetails.myftp.org, 6 Oct 2011 [cached]
Like thousands of other Americans, Judy Wolff, a nurse's aide at Holmen High School near La Crosse, dropped everything and rushed to New York City after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks to see how she could help. A volunteer with the American Red Cross, Wolff went to the World Trade Center site to help victims and their families get food vouchers and pay bills as they coped with the ... madison.com As part of the new arrangement, the Federal Reserve is reducing a $85 billion loan it had made available to AIG to $60 billion. The Fed also is replacing a separate $37.8 billion loan to the insurance company with a $52.5 billion aid package. www.katu.com
So, I've been sick, quite a ...
www.tammybaldwin.com [cached]
So, I've been sick, quite a bit,"said Judy Wolff, a Red Cross volunteer and Holmen native, who got ill after spending three weeks at Ground Zero.
...
In 2008 the Wisconsin State Journal reported,"The problem began in June, Wolff and others say, when Logistics Health Inc., of La Crosse, headed by former U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson, won an $11 million federal contract to provide medical care and health monitoring from the agency Thompson once led - a decision that continues to raise eyebrows on Capitol Hill."
...
In 2008 the Wisconsin State Journal reported: "The problem began in June, Wolff and others say, when Logistics Health Inc., of La Crosse, headed by former U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson, won an $11 million federal contract to provide medical care and health monitoring from the agency Thompson once led - a decision that continues to raise eyebrows on Capitol Hill.
...
And while NIOSH officials say all of the patients, such as Wolff, are now getting needed treatment, the claim is difficult to verify.
...
In 2008 the Wisconsin State Journal reported: "Like thousands of other Americans, Judy Wolff, a nurse's aide at Holmen High School near La Crosse, dropped everything and rushed to New York after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks to see how she could help. A volunteer with the American Red Cross, Wolff went to the World Trade Center site to help victims and their families get food vouchers and pay bills as they coped with the stunning loss of life, injuries and joblessness caused by the attacks. After three weeks of breathing in a toxic cloud of crushed concrete, asbestos, lead and fumes from burned jet fuel, Wolff herself now is fully disabled - one of thousands struggling with a constellation of ailments common to those who helped victims and pulled bodies from the wreckage seven years ago. Adding to her troubles: The 51-year-old Wolff has had to fight to get insurance coverage for her prescriptions, medical appointments and upcoming surgeries, even though Congress has set aside money specifically to care for her and the estimated 4,000 other responders living outside of the New York area… After Logistics Health Inc. took over this summer, Wolff said, her claims for reimbursement for expensive cough medicine and an inhaler came back as denied.
...
In 2008 the Wisconsin State Journal reported: "Anne Marie Baumann, senior vice president of the FealGood Foundation, which helps injured and ailing 9/11 responders, said she's heard from about three dozen responders around the country, including Wolff, about problems getting reimbursement for prescriptions and treatment from LHI. 'All of them were receiving services, and then all the services stopped, just like that,' Baumann said. 'I lose enough responders with cancer and leukemia and suicide.
...
In November 2008, the Wisconsin State Journal reported: "Wolff, who lives just 15 minutes' drive from the Logistics Health office in downtown La Crosse, said she doesn't want to single out anyone for blame.
...
In 2008 the Wisconsin State Journal reported: "Towns, the New York City congressman, said the care provided to Wolff and others is 'one of the worst-managed programs I've seen.
Onalaska Community Life - Features
www.onalaskacommunitylife.com, 11 June 2004 [cached]
Over the past two and a half years, the outlook for Judy Wolff has sometimes seemed as dark as the sky above Ground Zero that horrible September morning when a small band of terrorists gave the world a rude awakening.
...
Wolff served as a Red Cross volunteer near Ground Zero for several weeks after the Sept. 11 tragedy.Not long after she returned to Holmen from New York City, she began to have health problems, mainly a chronic cough and breathing problems, along with an immune system that couldn't seem to fight off even the weakest of infections.The inability to repel biological invaders is a big handicap for someone who worked in the medical field, as Wolff did, and she soon found herself unable to work.
She was not alone.Thousands of firefighters, rescue workers, people involved in salvage operations and others who toiled near Ground Zero reported having respiratory problems, not surprising considering the toxic stew they sucked into their lungs.After a while, they gave the syndrome a name - Trade Center Cough - and it has also become known as RADS.
Seven people from this area worked near Ground Zero in the weeks and months after the attacks, but so far Wolff is the only who has had major health problems from it.Symptoms might take years to surface, though, Wolff said.Her prediction for the other six, colored by her own experience and what she has learned about others who served near Ground Zero, is grim: "If you're not ill now, you will be later."
It's hard to blame Wolff for being pessimistic.Her family - husband Dirk and three children, Stephane, Heather and Neal - struggled financially because of the income she could no longer bring in after she got sick.Last fall, two years after she had gone to help in NYC, they had finally gotten some financial help through the Sept. 11 Recovery Program and other sources.With that help, they were only a month behind in their bills, although they still had loans they had to repay that had helped them get through the lean times.Wolff estimates her family has gone $40,000 in the hole because of her disabling health problems.
About the time things were starting to look up, a series of misfortunes began, starting with the her sister's cancer diagnosis and subsequent death in October.Shortly after her sister's passing, Wolff learned her mother had advanced pancreatic cancer.The day her mother died in February, Wolff's husband was rushed to the emergency room with chest pains and two days later had quadruple bypass surgery.
He had no benefits through his employer, Venture Machine and Tool in Onalaska, but BadgerCare took care of the medical bills, and he recently returned to his job there, which Wolff said was generously held open for him during his months of recovery.
Three years ago, Wolff would have been out toiling in the garden, but now gardening work even in the best of conditions causes her respiratory distress.This summer will be worse still because McHugh Road in front of her home is being rebuilt.She expects the dust to be so bad she'll have to put plastic over all the windows to try to keep it out of the house.
Despite all the bleak news, there have been some bright spots.
...
Wolff was referred to Moseng by Carol Franzen, an Onalaska woman who had read about Wolff's problems and wanted to help.
...
Wolff also has gotten financial help recently from the Holmen Lioness Club, and she said Holmen Lutheran Church has been generous, bringing the family gifts at Christmas time even though they are members at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church.
I sometimes wonder why more hasn't been done to help the Wolff family.Not only did Wolff go to help out in NYC after the terrorist attacks, for 10 years she served as a Red Cross volunteer at other disasters closer to home, from floods to fires, including the burning of the home where she grew up.She has exercised her instinct to help in other ways, too.Even with the health problems she struggles with, she has volunteered to be a Citizen Emergency Response Team trainer, helping to get these CERTs started locally so that if major calamities happen here, the community will be better prepared.
Maybe there hasn't been more of an outpouring of help because Wolff's health problems weren't brought on by a major trauma like a car accident and aren't life threatening, although they are expected to be lifelong.Or maybe it's because Wolff still teaches classes for the Holmen Recreation Department related to aviation, a longtime passion for her.
Wolff doesn't spend much time worrying about it."I take one day at a time" she said.
Onalaska Community Life - Features
www.onalaskacommunitylife.com, 19 Sept 2003 [cached]
After the World Trade Center towers collapsed on Sept. 11, 2001, Judy Wolff joined other American Red Cross volunteers in going to New York City to help the city recover.
...
For three weeks in 2001, while working only five blocks from Ground Zero, Wolff breathed dust that once was cement and metal and plastic and, yes, people that dissolved into dust and ash when the twin towers melted.
"We could see it and smell it and feel it, it was everywhere in the air," Wolff said.
A cough settled in her chest three days before she left New York City on Nov. 15, 2001.Two years later, she's still coughing.
Her immune system is so weak that Wolff had to leave her job as a school nurse's aide.She said she was told if she didn't return by the end of last week, the district would look for someone else.
"So now I'm officially unemployed," Wolff said."When and if the doctor says I can go back to work, I have nothing to go back to."
She said it's unlikely she can ever work in health care again."If the kids bring any kind of the sniffle home, I get sick," she said."I'm paranoid now, I'm afraid to be around anyone."
Holmen resident Judy Wolff is one of many who helped near Ground Zero in the aftermath of the 9-11 attacks and came away with lingering health problems.
...
"They call it World Trade Center dust-related illness," Wolff said.She's been warned it could be permanent.
Yet Wolff, who still is supervisor of the disaster action team for the Red Cross's Scenic Bluffs Chapter, said she doesn't regret the decision to go to New York City.
"I'd do it again if I could," she said.
She said she is disappointed, though, she was told while in New York that the dust she could see in the air and on her clothing would cause her no harm.
"They kept reassuring us we were going to be fine," she said, "which we're not."
She does acknowledge that of the seven area Red Cross workers who went to New York City, she is the only one experiencing health problems.Some rescue workers were right on top of the tower rubble, without masks, and had no ill effects.
"They can't say why some became ill and some didn't," Wolff said.
The family - husband Dirk and two teenage daughters and a son - also has gone into debt while she's been unable to work.An appeal to U.S. Rep.Ron Kind brought some assistance, and the Red Cross recently provided $10,000 in aid, which allowed her to catch up to being only a month behind on most bills, she said.
Wolff said she still worries "where am I going to get the money to keep us ahead, keep food on the table?"
She went back to New York City in March and in August, to see physicians at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, which is studying health problems reported by those exposed to World Trade Center smoke and debris.
She's set to return in November, to check on how the medications are doing.Meanwhile, she is hopeful she might be found eligible next month for part of a $2.5 million federal fund set aside for volunteers like her who have experienced health problems in the aftermath of Sept. 11.
Wolff said she saw some of the Sept. 11 anniversary coverage, but mostly tried to avoid the television that day.
"It still makes me cry a lot," she said, "because of the situation that a lot of people are in right now. ...
Like thousands of other Americans, ...
www.onsecuredcreditcards.com, 22 Jan 2010 [cached]
Like thousands of other Americans, Judy Wolff, a nurse's aide at Holmen High School near La Crosse, dropped everything and rushed to New York City after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks to see how she could help. A volunteer with the American Red Cross, Wolff went to the World Trade Center site to help victims and their families get food vouchers and pay bills as they coped with the ...
Other People with the name "Wolff":
Accelerate your business with the industry's most comprehensive profiles on business people and companies.
Find business contacts by city, industry and title. Our B2B directory has just-verified and in-depth profiles, plus the market's top tools for searching, targeting and tracking.
Atlanta | Boston | Chicago | Houston | Los Angeles | New York
Browse ZoomInfo's business people directory. Our professional profiles include verified contact information, biography, work history, affiliations and more.
Browse ZoomInfo's company directory. Our company profiles include corporate background information, detailed descriptions, and links to comprehensive employee profiles with verified contact information.
zirhbt201304