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Wrong Juan Villalba?

Juan Villalba

Section Editor

Utah State University

HQ Phone:  (435) 797-5600

Direct Phone: (435) ***-****direct phone

Email: j***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Utah State University

8200 Old Main Hill

Logan, Utah,84322

United States

Company Description

As Utah's land-grant university and one of only two research universities in the state, Utah State University provides research, public service and education to Utah, the nation and the world. USU is building upon its research capacity with focused areas of ex... more

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Web References(14 Total References)


www.naturalcuresforthrush.com

While the study indicates flies have used a toxin to survive, it's unclear whether that can be replicated among other animals, where fermented fruits or grains may not be as readily available, said Juan Villalba, associate professor of wildland resources at Utah State University.
"In nature, it's difficult to replicate," Villalba said. There's evidence to support that humans have learned from animal behavior which plants to select for medicine, but it's never been shown with alcohol, he adds.


www.4apes.com

Juan Villalba of Utah State University's Department of Wildland Resources, and co-author Serge Landau of Israel's Volcani Center explain how goats sometimes nibble on the anti-parasitic plant Albizia anthelmintica.


www.behave.net [cached]

Juan Villalba
BEHAVE: Behavioral Education for Human, Animal, Vegetation & Ecosystem Management Juan Villalba Juan Villalba Research Assistant Professor Department of Wildland Resources Utah State University Logan, UT 84322-5230 (435) 797-2539 - BNR 213 villalba@cc.usu.edu Dr. Juan J. Villalba is a research assistant professor in the Department of Department of Wildland Resources at Utah State University. Juan received his M.S. in Plant Production from Universidad Nacional del Sur (Argentina) in 1991 and his Ph.D. in Range Science from Utah State University in 1996. His research focuses on understanding the mechanisms that influence food selection and intake in herbivores, with the aim of creating efficient alternatives to manage animals and their environment. To accomplish such goal he is currently using a variety of approaches which include pen and field studies, as well as multi agent based simulation models. His research program has resulted in more than 30 peer-reviewed publications, several in the best journals in the field, including The British Journal of Nutrition , The Journal of Animal Science, Nutrition Research Reviews , Oikos, and The Journal of Chemical Ecology and Animal Behaviour . Juan serves as Research Coordinator on the project. His involvement with BEHAVE also includes conducting and supervising experiments in diet mixing and nutrient-toxin interactions.


hurricaines.rivals.com [cached]

"If 'stupid' means an inability to behave based on past experiences or on consequences, sheep are not stupid at all," says Lounge Scientist #90 Juan Villalba, a researcher at Utah State University, who has not yet tested cows and horses as Bert suggests.


www.behave.net

These results contrasted an earlier study by Villalba and Provenza where lambs readily ate foods that contained toxins (oxalate, tannin or terpenes) even when alternative high-quality, low-toxin foods were available.Juan VillalbaResearch Scientist, Behavior/Nutrition Utah State University


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