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Wrong Joshua Madalena?

Joshua Madalena

Governor

Jemez Natural Resources Department

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Web References(61 Total References)


New Mexico Signs Agreement for Joint Management of Historic Jemez State Monument – Guidebook America Plus

www.guidebookamerica.com [cached]

Negotiations with Governor Madalena have been a distinct pleasure and honor, and we are thrilled by the opportunity for collaboration, joint management, and the engagement of Jemez leadership in such a significant cultural site in New Mexico."
Joshua Madalena, Governor of Jemez, states, "The people of Jemez are committed to the preservation of our cultural identity.


www.abqjournal.com

Joshua Madalena - Former chair of the county commission; president of the Jemez Valley Public Schools Board of Education; governor of Jemez Pueblo.


www.pechanga.net

Former Jemez Pueblo governor Joshua Madalena has recaptured an art form lost for 300 years: the pueblo's original black-on-white pottery.


www.abqjournal.com

Joshua Madalena of Jemez Pueblo is a potter who has lead the people of the Jemez culture to claim ancestry to the Fremont culture through his rediscovery of old pottery techniques. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) | Former Jemez Pueblo governor discovers pueblo’s long-lost original black-on-white pottery
Former Jemez Pueblo governor discovers pueblo's long-lost original black-on-white pottery | Albuquerque Journal News A Jemez black-on-white bowl by Joshua Madalena. The original formula for making the pottery was lost to the pueblo upon the Spanish reconquest. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) From the fiery alchemy of volcanic ash, pumice and basalt come the whispers of the ancestors. Former Jemez Pueblo governor Joshua Madalena has recaptured an art form lost for 300 years: the pueblo's original black-on-white pottery. Joshua Madalena of Jemez Pueblo is a potter who has lead the people of the Jemez culture to claim ancestry to the Fremont culture through his rediscovery of old pottery techniques. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) Joshua Madalena of Jemez Pueblo is a potter who has lead the people of the Jemez culture to claim ancestry to the Fremont culture through his rediscovery of old pottery techniques. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) A vase of black-on-white Jemez pottery by Joshua Madalena, who spent 10 years rediscovering the method of making it. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) A vase of black-on-white Jemez pottery by Joshua Madalena, who spent 10 years rediscovering the method of making it. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) Visitors to the adobe home Madalena built 18 years ago see a mammoth 24- by 22-inch black-on-white corn vase perched on a foyer pedestal. A smaller bowl cradles cornmeal for prayer. Half a dozen jars and bowls, large and small, embellish the dining room table. A self-taught archaeologist who served as pueblo governor in 2010, 2012 and 2014, Madalena was a Sandoval County commissioner from 2004 to 2008. He also worked as a special research assistant to the pueblo archaeologist. The pair traveled the world, while Madalena absorbed information and techniques. The distinctive black-on-white pottery thrived from 1300 to 1700. It vanished with the Spanish reconquest. "We were oppressed," Madalena said. Madalena climbed those mesas as part of his research. "I would ask the ancestors permission to take a pottery shard," he said. Joshua Madalena, former governor of Jemez Pueblo, holds a plate he made using the pueblo's traditional black-on-white method. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) Joshua Madalena, former governor of Jemez Pueblo, holds a plate he made using the pueblo's traditional black-on-white method. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) Then he discovered the original mine on a mesa top near the village. He spiraled the clay into a pot using the traditional coil method, added a white slip, then polished his first piece with a stone. He gleaned paint formulas from his grandmother, known as one of the finest storytellers at Jemez: a combination of roots and bee weed, boiled and extracted to the consistency of molasses. "It's kind of like painting with honey," he said. "It's sticky." The straight lines, triangles and animal motifs reflect pictographs and petroglyphs as well as ancient pottery shards. "They would paint their desires, their hopes, their wants," Madalena explained, "like courage, unity, mountains, the stories of elders. I consider it like an encyclopedia because it gives you information from the past." Traditional pit firing would prove even more difficult. "I probably broke over 200 pieces of pottery," Madalena said. Stones used by Joshua Madalena to smooth out his pottery in the process of making it. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) Stones used by Joshua Madalena to smooth out his pottery in the process of making it. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal) Today he smothers the pottery with dirt. He took his first pieces for a talk at the 2009 Santa Fe Indian Market. In 2012, he won the Lifetime Achievement Allen Houser Legacy Award from the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts, the market's umbrella organization. He also took the First Place Award for pottery. Madalena hopes the findings encourage other pueblo people to rediscover the pottery. His 2-year-old grandson Liam already has his hands in the clay. "No pottery that has been made in the last 100 years has done what we've done," he said.


www.pechanga.net

Former Jemez Pueblo governor Joshua Madalena has recaptured...


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