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Wrong Joseph Judd?

Joseph T. Judd

Chemist

U.S. Department of Agriculture

HQ Phone:  (202) 720-2791

Direct Phone: (301) ***-****direct phone

Email: j***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

1400 Independence Avenue, S.W.

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20250

United States

Company Description

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-...more

Background Information

Employment History

Acting Director

Beltsville Agricultural Research Center


Research Chemist

Human Nutrition Research Center


Contributor

MSNBC


Nutrition Researcher At the Human Nutrition ResearchCenter

U.S. Departmentof Agriculture Agricultural Research Services


Web References(67 Total References)


purepuer.com

Research chemist Joseph T. Judd, article written by Rosali Marion Bliss
United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service, Diet and Human Performance Laboratory Drinking tea lowered low-density lipoprotein, the LDL "bad" cholesterol, in a small group of volunteers in an Agricultural Research Service study reported in the October issue of the Journal of Nutrition. The study was led by research chemist Joseph T. Judd with the agency's Diet and Human Performance Laboratory, one of seven laboratories at ARS' Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center. According to Judd, many of those studies may not have adequately controlled the background diets of the volunteers. "Other foods or nutrients consumed during the studies could have affected the risk factors," he said.


www.lochantea.com [cached]

"These study results indicate that drinking tea regularly has the potential to lower levels of LDL cholesterol, reducing risk factors of cardiovascular disease," said Joseph Judd, PhD, Research Chemist, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, USDA.


www.margarine.org [cached]

Dr. Joseph Judd - USDA
301-504-9014 The research, published in the October issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, was conducted by Dr. Joseph Judd, a prominent nutrition researcher at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Services' Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland. The research compared butter with two types of margarines (margarine with either a moderate amount of trans fat or no trans fat) in diets fed to 46 men and women with normal cholesterol levels. Dr. Judd found that even margarines with a moderate amount of trans fat had a much better effect on blood cholesterol levels than did butter. While the margarine that contains the moderate amount of trans fat lowered levels of "bad" cholesterol compared to butter (which is rich in saturated fat), the trans fat-free margarine fared slightly better. Neither of the margarines lowered the levels of good cholesterol, either. "One reason we saw these results is that, compared to butter, most margarine products contain more poly- and mono-unsaturated fats than trans or saturated fats," states Dr. Judd. "Too many times, consumers get confused by scientific reports on specific fats; then they translate those reports to changes in their eating behavior," he adds. Because this has happened over the past few years, particularly with margarine, Dr. Judd reminds consumers, "We do not eat specific fats. We eat foods such as margarine that contain a wide variety of fats. While he believes that it is wise for consumers to reduce their intake of trans fats where they can, Judd warns, "you should not be overly concerned to the point you substitute saturated fats for trans fats. Saturated fats average about 12 percent of the total calories in the diet and are a major dietary factor in cardiovascular disease risk. Trans fats comprise only 2-3 percent of calories on the other hand." Dr. Judd's research is the latest of several studies done around the world which demonstrate that margarine can be an important part of a heart-healthy diet. Seven other studies published or presented during the past two years, involving nearly 70,000 people, confirm Dr. Judd's results. "We now know that about 60 percent of consumer purchases today are tub and squeeze products -- the type products AHA suggests consumers use (and have proportions of fats similar to the products used in Dr. Judd's research).


www.margerine.org [cached]

Dr. Joseph Judd - USDA
301-504-9014 LATEST USDA RESEARCH CONFIRMS HEALTH PROFESSIONALS' RECOMMENDATIONS TO CHOOSE MARGARINE WASHINGTON -- A new study from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) confirms what leading health groups have been saying for years -- margarine, particularly the softer varieties, is the tablespread of choice in a heart-healthy diet. The research, published in the October issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, was conducted by Dr. Joseph Judd, a prominent nutrition researcher at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Services' Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland. The research compared butter with two types of margarines (margarine with either a moderate amount of trans fat or no trans fat) in diets fed to 46 men and women with normal cholesterol levels. Dr. Judd found that even margarines with a moderate amount of trans fat had a much better effect on blood cholesterol levels than did butter. While the margarine that contains the moderate amount of trans fat lowered levels of "bad" cholesterol compared to butter (which is rich in saturated fat), the trans fat-free margarine fared slightly better. Neither of the margarines lowered the levels of good cholesterol, either. "One reason we saw these results is that, compared to butter, most margarine products contain more poly- and mono-unsaturated fats than trans or saturated fats," states Dr. Judd. "Too many times, consumers get confused by scientific reports on specific fats; then they translate those reports to changes in their eating behavior," he adds. Because this has happened over the past few years, particularly with margarine, Dr. Judd reminds consumers, "We do not eat specific fats. We eat foods such as margarine that contain a wide variety of fats. While he believes that it is wise for consumers to reduce their intake of trans fats where they can, Judd warns, "you should not be overly concerned to the point you substitute saturated fats for trans fats. Saturated fats average about 12 percent of the total calories in the diet and are a major dietary factor in cardiovascular disease risk. Trans fats comprise only 2-3 percent of calories on the other hand." Dr. Judd's research is the latest of several studies done around the world which demonstrate that margarine can be an important part of a heart-healthy diet. Seven other studies published or presented during the past two years, involving nearly 70,000 people, confirm Dr. Judd's results. "We now know that about 60 percent of consumer purchases today are tub and squeeze products -- the type products AHA suggests consumers use (and have proportions of fats similar to the products used in Dr. Judd's research).


store.totaltea.com [cached]

"This may indicate that drinking tea regularly could have a beneficial effect if consumed regularly as part of a mixed diet for most people," said Joseph Judd, a chemist with the USDA, who led the study."We aren't talking about drinking tea over a lifetime, which we really can't study, but we have a short study and indications are very positive," he said.Judd and his colleagues placed 15 participants on a six-week, double-blind study."We had the same background diet for every subject throughout the whole study because these active ingredients (that lower cholesterol) occur in a lot of other foods" such as apples or onions, said Judd.Scientists at the USDA's research division also are studying the bioactivity of tea compounds for use in treating a wide-range of diseases.


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