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2016-11-17T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Joseph Izen?

Dr. Joseph M. Izen

Direct Phone: (972) ***-****       

Email: j***@***.edu

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University of Texas at Dallas

800 W Campbell Road

Richardson, Texas 75080

United States

Company Description

The University of Texas at Dallas, located at the convergence of Richardson, Plano and Dallas in the heart of the complex of major multinational technology corporations known as the Telecom Corridor, enrolls more than 14,000 students. The university offer ... more

Find other employees at this company (10,659)

Background Information

Employment History

Professor

UT Dallas

Affiliations

Chair of the Faculty Advisory Committee
MSET

Web References (20 Total References)


Temperature and Humidity at CERN

www.filesthrutheair.com [cached]

Joseph M. Izen, Professor of Physics at the University of Texas at Dallas and CERN Scientific Associate at the time, contacted the FilesThuTheAirTM team with the task of providing a solution to measure the humidity of the IBL during its transportation.

The WiFi-TH+ sensors coupled with the FilesThruTheAirTM Cloud, were the perfect answer to the challenge Professor Izen and the IBL team were facing. Continually-measured temperature and humidity, readings logged by FilesThruTheAir™ WiFi sensors are universally accessible from any Internet enabled device through the FilesThruTheAir™ cloud-based monitoring platform. Each WiFi-TH+ sensor communicates via an existing WiFi connection, updating the data automatically to the Cloud periodically, providing maximum simplicity to the data gathering process.
A clever twist:
The area between the build zone and the final location in the shaft, or in the shaft itself, did not provide an existing WiFi infrastructure, so the FilesThruTheAirTM sensors were used in conjunction with a small 3G mobile router.  Each WiFi-TH+ unit was modified to have external sensors which were placed inside the IBL, with the main unit mounted on the outside.  Professor Izen's team easily configured the sensors to take readings every minute, to transmit directly to the FilesThruTheAirTM Cloud every five minutes, and to send email alerts to key personnel if any sensor measured over the critical 10% humidity. The large, passive LCD displays were popular with the engineers as they could be easily read at a distance, even in daylight. Once the move had successfully been completed, Professor Izen said
...
Joseph M. Izen, Professor of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas and CERN Scientific Associate at the time.


News About Faculty at UT Dallas

www.universityoftexasatdallascomets.com [cached]

Dr. Joe Izen What began as entertainment at a dinner to celebrate the construction of a Large Hadron Collider experiment at the CERN laboratory in Switzerland culminated in an unusual side project among scientists, including UT Dallas' Dr. Joe Izen. The result is a double album of original material featuring everything from Izen's mountain music to classical harp and, of course, rock. read more


Joe Izen got caught up in ...

www.squirrelheads.org [cached]

Joe Izen got caught up in the old time music scene during the early 80's after moving to Ithaca, New York.

...
By 1980, Joe had switched from guitar to banjo as his main instrument. In 1982, equipped with a Ph.D. and a Mike Allison copy of a Whyte Ladie banjo purchased with graduation present money, Joe headed off for post-doctoral work in Hamburg, Germany. While in Hamburg, Joe worked on techniques such as drop-thumbing, but most if all, he tried to capture the joyful sound of the music from Ithaca dances and jams. In Germany, he mainly played with friends, but made his first public appearance on banjo at the Blockhütte, a country bar in St. Pauli, Hamburg just off the Reeperbahn, about 20 years after the Beatles frequented the place. In 1986, Joe moved to Urbana, Illinois and settled into the old time music and dance scene in the Midwest. Two years later at a Swing into Spring dance weekend in Indiana, Joe plus a bunch Urbana-Champaign dancers took a band workshop together and the Saline Ditch Stringband was born. Within a year, they had a tighter sound, a much better name ("The Cradlerockers" after the tune, "Rock the Cradle Joe" - everyone in the band was a parent except for Joe), and they were playing regularly for the Urbana contra dance. Two midwestern banjo players whose playing influenced Joe were Steve Rosen of the Volo Bogtrotters and Dave Landreth of the Allen Street Stringband.
...
Joe hooked up with Ray Quigley to form the core of Squirrelheads in Gravy shortly after moving to Texas in 1991. (Originally the Raynormalization Stringband, the band was renamed with help from former Squirrelhead, Gary Washmon, a fiddler in Denton, TX).
...
When Joe isn't playing banjo he is a physics professor at UT Dallas doing elementary particle physics with the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and with the BaBar experiment at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.
...
When the number of fiddles in the Squirrelheads grew, Joe thought the banjo section was getting short shrift, and he made a pitch for another banjo. Joe's bandmates had a different kind of banjo pitch in mind. They told Joe he played so well that there was no need for another banjo. Joe is mollified for the moment.
...
Copyright © 2005-2010 Joseph M. Izen


Joe Izen got caught up in ...

www.squirrelheads.org [cached]

Joe Izen got caught up in the old time music scene during the early 80's after moving to Ithaca, New York.

...
By 1980, Joe had switched from guitar to banjo as his main instrument. In 1982, equipped with a Ph.D. and a Mike Allison copy of a Whyte Ladie banjo purchased with graduation present money, Joe headed off for post-doctoral work in Hamburg, Germany. While in Hamburg, Joe worked on techniques such as drop-thumbing, but most if all, he tried to capture the joyful sound of the music from Ithaca dances and jams. In Germany, he mainly played with friends, but made his first public appearance on banjo at the Blockhütte, a country bar in St. Pauli, Hamburg just off the Reeperbahn, about 20 years after the Beatles frequented the place. In 1986, Joe moved to Urbana, Illinois and settled into the old time music and dance scene in the Midwest. Two years later at a Swing into Spring dance weekend in Indiana, Joe plus a bunch Urbana-Champaign dancers took a band workshop together and the Saline Ditch Stringband was born. Within a year, they had a tighter sound, a much better name ("The Cradlerockers" after the tune, "Rock the Cradle Joe" - everyone in the band was a parent except for Joe), and they were playing regularly for the Urbana contra dance. Two midwestern banjo players whose playing influenced Joe were Steve Rosen of the Volo Bogtrotters and Dave Landreth of the Allen Street Stringband.
...
Joe hooked up with Ray Quigley to form the core of Squirrelheads in Gravy shortly after moving to Texas in 1991. (Originally the Raynormalization Stringband, the band was renamed with help from former Squirrelhead, Gary Washmon, a fiddler in Denton, TX).
...
When Joe isn't playing banjo he is a physics professor at UT Dallas doing elementary particle physics with the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and with the BaBar experiment at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.
...
When the number of fiddles in the Squirrelheads grew, Joe thought the banjo section was getting short shrift, and he made a pitch for another banjo. Joe's bandmates had a different kind of banjo pitch in mind. They told Joe he played so well that there was no need for another banjo. Joe is mollified for the moment.
...
Copyright © 2005-2010 Joseph M. Izen


Joe Izen got caught up in ...

d49749.u26.websitesource.net [cached]

Joe Izen got caught up in the old time music scene during the early 80's after moving to Ithaca, New York.

...
By 1980, Joe had switch from guitar to banjo as his main instrument. In 1982, equipped with a Ph.D. and a copy of a Whyte Lady banjo purchased with graduation present money, Joe headed off for post-doctoral work in Hamburg, Germany. During this time, Joe worked on techniques such as drop-thumbing, but most of all on capturing the joyful sound of the music from Ithaca dances and jams. In Germany, he mainly played with friends, but made his first public appearance on banjo at the Blockhütte, a country bar in St. Pauli, Hamburg just off the Reeperbahn. In 1986, Joe moved to Urbana, Illinois and settled into the old time music and dance scene in the Midwest. Two years later at a Swing into Spring dance weekend in Indiana, Joe plus a bunch Urbana-Champaign dancers took a band workshop together and the Saline Ditch Stringband was born. Within a year, they had a tighter sound, a much better name ("The Cradlerockers" after the tune, "Rock the Cradle Joe" - everyone in the band was a parent except for Joe), and were playing regularly for dances. Two midwestern banjo players whose playing influenced Joe were Steve Rosen of the Volo Bogtrotters and Dave Landreth of the Allen Street Stringband.
...
Four years later, after co-hosting a weekly radio show and settling how any children they might someday have would be raised, Neia and Joe decided to date. The rest happened rather quickly.
Neia and Joe hooked up with Ray Quigley to form the core of Squirrelheads in Gravy shortly after moving to Texas in 1991. (Originally the Raynormalization Stringband, the band was renamed with help from former Squirrelhead, Gary Washmon, a fiddler in Denton, TX).
...
Joe and Neia tend to prefer a driving southern-style rather than the more melodic New England style.
...
Joe says that he only sings when the band is amplified so loudly that no one on the dance floor can hear him.
When Joe isn't playing banjo he is a physics professor at UT Dallas doing elementary particle physics with the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and with the BaBar expirement at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. After twenty years in Texas, Neia has taken an academic job in Virginia. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Special Education at George Mason University. When Neia tells Joe he's special, he doesn't know whether to worry.
...
When the number of fiddles in the Squirrelheads grew, Joe thought the banjo section was getting short shrift, and he made a pitch for another banjo. Joe's bandmates had a different kind of banjo pitch in mind. They told Joe he played so well that there was no need for another banjo. Joe is mollified for the moment.
...
Copyright © 2005-2010 Joseph M. Izen

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