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Wrong Jorge Sanchez?

Jorge Mario Sanchez

Economist

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Professor At the Center for the Study of the Cuban Economy

University of Havana


Economist and Researcher At the Center for the Study of the Cuban Economy

University of Havana


Economist

University of Havana


Web References(13 Total References)


www.acjourneys.com

Jorge Mario Sanchez, economist, will dissect the Cuban economy and provide insights into the economic future of Cuba.


www.acjourneys.com [cached]

Jorge Mario Sanchez, economist, will dissect the Cuban economy and provide insights
into the economic future of Cuba.


www.yakima-herald.com

"There's an agenda for change," says economist Jorge Mario Sánchez, a professor at the University of Havana's Center for the Study of the Cuban Economy.
The mother-daughter duo (Lourdes I and Lourdes II), who asked that their last names not be used because they still fear the power of the Communist government, exemplify the changes that are transforming economic and social life in Cuba. They have been preparing to rent their room since last fall, about a year after the tightly-controlled central government declared intentions to relax restrictions and open a wider portion of the economy to low-level capitalism. Sanchez said the changes are deliberately slow. "We have to build a new Cuban economy step-by-step, correcting what we are doing every day," Sánchez says. But, says Sánchez, "The value of the peso is going down and down."


www.TheHavanaNote.com [cached]

Jorge Mario Sanchez, an economist and prolific researcher at the University of Havana's Center for the Study of the Cuban Economy, addressed why these changes are needed now - I loved his Pac-Man metaphor, a Cuba fat from consumption but not producing enough to sustain itself - and reminded us why they have been so slow.
These changes, unlike those emergency measures taken in the 1990's, are here to stay, so there's an abundance of caution. This of course means revising new rules quite a lot and essentially "learning by doing. But, Sanchez notes, the goal is 35% of the labor force shifted to the non-state sector in the next few years - not an insignificant shift.


www.worldpress.org [cached]

"The new food purchases have been both a psychological and political stimulus," explained Jorge Mario Sánchez, an economist with the University of Havana."Psychologically, the food purchases have given U.S. companies the green light and maintained their commercial interest, and politically, they have helped to offset the Bush administration's hard-line stance on its Cuba policy." Though food and medicine are exempt from the trade embargo the United States has maintained against Cuba since the early 1960s, Washington still forbids U.S. banks from financing sales to Cuba, and demands that all transactions with the island's communist government be cash-only.Other U.S. laws, such as the 1992 Cuba Democracy Act, or the "Torricelli Law" as it's known in Cuba, seek to discourage other countries from trading with the island at all, by preventing, for example, any cargo ships from docking in the United States that have called at Cuban ports within the previous six months.The Cuban government claims the U.S. embargo has resulted in billions of dollars in damages to the island's economy over the course of the last four decades. top of page


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